City and County Consolidation for Los Angeles

Clark, Herbert W. (director)

Published by Tax Payers' Association of California (1917), 1917
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Description:

194 pages plus two large folding maps and many folding charts and tables. An argument for consolidation of the LA basin's many small cities. In the 1920s, seven smaller municipalities, including Watts and Venice, were incorporated into the City of Los Angeles. First edition (first printing). Very good in wrappers (paperback). Ownership stamp on front cover; rear cover and endpaper chipped. Bookseller Inventory #

Bibliographic Details

Title: City and County Consolidation for Los ...
Publisher: Tax Payers' Association of California (1917)
Publication Date: 1917
Binding: Trade Paperback
Book Condition: Very Good
Edition: First Edition.

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1.

Tax Payers California
Published by Rarebooksclub.com, United States (2012)
ISBN 10: 123656572X ISBN 13: 9781236565723
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
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Book Description Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: .returns would apply to a situation of this kind and that it is seriously questionable whether the addition of two judges to eighteen, or five judges to fifteen, really enables a court to transact more business. Is there not more room for a tendency toward confusion to become more pronounced? Below the superior courts there are numerous justice, police and recorders courts, the judges of which are practically all elected. Much has been said and written in recent years about the law s delays and the disrepute into which the courts have fallen in some quarters. That the administration of justice is expensive is a fact which no one will dispute, and that no real steps have been taken to lessen the cost of administering justice is equally true. The American Bar Association and various state bar associations have discussed these matters and have published large volumes on the subject. Briefly, the trend of these discussions favors an appointive judiciary, simplification of court organization, simplification of legal machinery and procedure, and the unification of courts. The American Judicature Society, of comparatively recent origin, is devoting itself seriously to the problem of court unification. Its secretary, Mr. Herbert Harley, has come to the conclusion that the lack of ordinary business organization is common in the courts of all large American cities. It is a relic of pioneer conditions. It is the most conspicuous defect from which the public and the judges alike now most suffer, but fortunately, it is the defect most readily cured. Generally speaking, this society recommends what is in essence the manager plan for the courts: one judge who acts as an executive, with power to appoint other judges and to perform executive duties in. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781236565723

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2.

Tax Payers' California
Published by RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 123656572X ISBN 13: 9781236565723
New Paperback Quantity Available: 20
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Book Description RareBooksClub. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 50 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.1in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: . . . returns would apply to a situation of this kind and that it is seriously questionable whether the addition of two judges to eighteen, or five judges to fifteen, really enables a court to transact more business. Is there not more room for a tendency toward confusion to become more pronounced Below the superior courts there are numerous justice, police and recorders courts, the judges of which are practically all elected. Much has been said and written in recent years about the laws delays and the disrepute into which the courts have fallen in some quarters. That the administration of justice is expensive is a fact which no one will dispute, and that no real steps have been taken to lessen the cost of administering justice is equally true. The American Bar Association and various state bar associations have discussed these matters and have published large volumes on the subject. Briefly, the trend of these discussions favors an appointive judiciary, simplification of court organization, simplification of legal machinery and procedure, and the unification of courts. The American Judicature Society, of comparatively recent origin, is devoting itself seriously to the problem of court unification. Its secretary, Mr. Herbert Harley, has come to the conclusion that the lack of ordinary business organization is common in the courts of all large American cities. It is a relic of pioneer conditions. It is the most conspicuous defect from which the public and the judges alike now most suffer, but fortunately, it is the defect most readily cured. Generally speaking, this society recommends what is in essence the manager plan for the courts: one judge who acts as an executive, with power to appoint other judges and to perform executive duties in. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781236565723

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3.

Tax Payers California
Published by Rarebooksclub.com, United States (2012)
ISBN 10: 123656572X ISBN 13: 9781236565723
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: .returns would apply to a situation of this kind and that it is seriously questionable whether the addition of two judges to eighteen, or five judges to fifteen, really enables a court to transact more business. Is there not more room for a tendency toward confusion to become more pronounced? Below the superior courts there are numerous justice, police and recorders courts, the judges of which are practically all elected. Much has been said and written in recent years about the law s delays and the disrepute into which the courts have fallen in some quarters. That the administration of justice is expensive is a fact which no one will dispute, and that no real steps have been taken to lessen the cost of administering justice is equally true. The American Bar Association and various state bar associations have discussed these matters and have published large volumes on the subject. Briefly, the trend of these discussions favors an appointive judiciary, simplification of court organization, simplification of legal machinery and procedure, and the unification of courts. The American Judicature Society, of comparatively recent origin, is devoting itself seriously to the problem of court unification. Its secretary, Mr. Herbert Harley, has come to the conclusion that the lack of ordinary business organization is common in the courts of all large American cities. It is a relic of pioneer conditions. It is the most conspicuous defect from which the public and the judges alike now most suffer, but fortunately, it is the defect most readily cured. Generally speaking, this society recommends what is in essence the manager plan for the courts: one judge who acts as an executive, with power to appoint other judges and to perform executive duties in. Bookseller Inventory # APC9781236565723

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