AbeBooks' Reading Copy

AbeBooks book blog

Advanced Search Browse Books Rare Books Textbooks
Advanced Search

10 books about riots


This week I was following as closely as possible the riots and unrest in the UK. I read and watched with a mixture of shame (being English) and fascination (like seeing a car crash).

Watching Twitter (#londonriots) was particularly interesting – a mixture of deeply personal opinions and experiences, lots of rumors and untruths, traditional media updates, Youtube links and pictures from mobile phones. Riots of this nature are always shocking. Look at the riots in Vancouver in June after the Vancouver Canucks lost a hockey game. Rioting over a hockey match – that’s madness.

I’m now a long way from Tottenham, Hackney and Toxteth, but this week’s events reminded me of the 1981 riots in Brixton and Handsworth. I vividly recall the TV pictures showing the police being so unprepared and so poorly trained that they had to use dustbin lids as shields during their epic fail at mob control.

Riots have been commonplace for centuries – race riots, tax riots, draft riots, prison riots, political injustice riots, lack of food riots etc. It’s a long list, and authors and academics have produced many books analyzing the causes and effects of these disturbances. Below is a selection of 10 particularly interesting looking books about riots.

Ten books about riots

Riot, Rebellion, and Revolution: Rural Social Conflict in Mexico edited by Friedrich Katz

Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906 by Mark Bauerlein

Riots Past and Present by Philip Steele

Burn, Baby, Burn! The Los Angeles Race Riot, August, 1965 by Jerry Cohen and William S. Murphy

Boston and the Tea Riots by Norma R Fryatt

King Mob: The Story of Lord George Gordon and the Riots of 1780 by Christopher Hibbert

Violent London: 200 Years of Riots, Rebels and Revolts by Clive Bloom

The Great Riots of New York: 1712-1873 by Joel Tyler Headley

The Clerkenwell Riot by Gavin Thurston

The Rebecca Riots by Vera Eirwen Davies

The excellent Prospero blog at the Economist also has an interesting posting on books, bookshops and the riots.

Twitter Digg Delicious Stumbleupon Technorati Facebook Email
Richard Davies

No comments yet... Be the first to leave a reply!