AbeBooks' Reading Copy

AbeBooks book blog

Advanced Search Browse Books Rare Books Textbooks
Advanced Search

The Daphne Shortlist Revives the Best Books of 1963


Old books are what we do best, so when we heard about the creation of the Daphne Award we were on board. Created by Bookslut editor Jessa Crispin, the Daphne Award will recognize the then-unacknowledged books of years past, beginning with 1963. The first-ever Daphne Award shortlist was announced just last week and includes classic titles that have stood the test of time, like Where the Wild Things Are and The Bell Jar.  See the fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and children’s books that made the cut – 50 years later.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, 1963Fiction

Hopscotch by Julio Cortazar
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Grifters by Jim Thompson
The Clown by Heinrich Boll
Ice Palace by Tarjei Vesaas
Dreambook for Our Time by Tadeusz Konwicki
The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima

Non-Fiction

The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
Anti-Intellectualism in American Life by Richard Hofstadter
Destruction of Dresden by David Irving
Poems by Gwen Harwood, 1963Eichmann in Jerusalem by Hannah Arendt
The Reawakening by Primo Levi
The Making of the English Working Class by E.P. Thompson

Poetry

Burning Perch by Louis MacNeice
Snapshots of a Daughter-in-Law by Adrienne Rich
Requiem by Anna Akhmatova
Selected Poems by Gwendolyn Brooks
Five Senses by Judith Wright
Poems by Gwen Harwood
At the End of the Open Road by Louis Simpson

Children’s Books

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak, 1963The Dot and the Line by Norton Juster
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
Mr. Rabbit by Charlotte Zolotow
Harold’s ABC by Crockett Johnson
Lafcadio, The Lion Who Shot Back by Shel Silverstein
The Moon by Night by Madeline L’Engle
Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective by Donald J. Sobol
Gashlycrumb Tinies by Edward Gorey

Twitter Digg Delicious Stumbleupon Technorati Facebook Email
Jessica Doyle

One Response to “The Daphne Shortlist Revives the Best Books of 1963”

  1. Anyone else feel uncomfortable seeing David Irving’s name next to Arendt and Levi’s???