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Item Description: Washington, DC, 1864. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Endorsement Signed as President, to John D. Defrees, Washington, D.C., February 8, 1864. On verso of an excellent content Autograph Letter Signed by Defrees, February 7, 1864. Complete Transcript [Defrees to Lincoln] Washington Feby 7, 1864Mr. President: The last session of the 36th Congress proposed to so amend the Constitution of the U.S. as to prohibit any interference with slavery, (by the General Government) where it then existed. It was disregarded, and the slave states resorted to war to separate from the free states. Now, why not send a message to Congress recommending the passage of a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution forever prohibiting slavery in the States and territories? It would be your measure and would be passed by a two thirds vote, and, eventually, three fourths of the States, through their Legislatures, would consent to it. If not done very soon the proposition will be presented by the Democracy and claimed by them as their proposition. This may look strange to those who do not remember with what facility that party can change front. Is it not right in itself and the best way to end slavery! It would have a beneficial influence on our elections in the fall. Those who deny the justice of a second term to you are attempting to weaken the faith of the people in your plan of reorganizing the state Governments of the rebel states. They say, suppose a state does so change its constitution as to prohibit slavery, why may it not, in a few years, hereafter, change back again? The proposed amendment would answer that cavil [objection]. A single amendment, thus submitted to the Legislature of the several states, would not open the whole constitution to amendment-and no harm can come of it, even should it fail to receive the sanction of the constitutional number of states. If done, it would be in accordance with the mode provided by the constitution itself-to which no one could reasonably object. Many reasons could be given in its favor-but I only desire to call our attention to the subject, and not to trouble you with an argument. Should you submit such a proposition I think it would be heartily endorsed by our State Convention on the 22d. inst. I think it a great move on the political chess board. Very Respectfully Your friend Jno D. Defrees[Lincoln's response to Defrees:]"Our own friends have this under consideration now, and will do as much without a Message or with it. AL. February 8, 1864"Historical BackgroundJohn D. Defrees (1810-1882) bought the Indianapolis Journal in 1846 and founded a pro-Republican newspaper, the Atlas, in 1858. He was elected to the Indiana state Senate and tried (unsuccessfully) to gain the nomination for Indiana representative in Congress in 1858. By 1860, he was a major force in Indiana Republican politics. Lincoln named Defrees "Public Printer," the head of the Government Printing Office, where he remained a powerful supporter of Lincoln and the Republican agenda.Ending slavery became a war aim after Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. However, the proclamation was issued as a military order, and offered no permanent protection to the freedmen and women. Abolitionists had long advocated a constitutional amendment ending slavery. Defrees's concerns regarding the Democratic Party co-opting the issue of ending slavery is somewhat mystifying. Nearly a month earlier, on January 11, 1864, former Democratic Senator John B. Henderson of slave state Missouri submitted a resolution for an anti-slavery amendment. Despite having been reared in Virginia, Henderson was against slavery, and upon the outbreak of the war, he even changed party affiliations to Republican, and chose to serve the Union. He was elected to the Missouri State Convention where he opposed secession. He was also named brigadier general of the Missouri militia before being appointed to the Senate. Considering Defrees's placemen. (See website for full description). Autograph Endorsement Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 23199

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) GARDNER, ALEXANDER

Published by Washington: Alexander Gardner, August 9, 1863 (1863)

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Item Description: Washington: Alexander Gardner, August 9, 1863, 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Near Fine. "A previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality"-Ostendorf. Albumen print, retouched in the print, trimmed to oval, 15 x 12 in. Original mahogany frame. This is the only known example of this highly important large-format photograph of Lincoln, once owned by the President’s private secretary John Hay, taken one month after the Battle of Gettysburg. Lincoln sat for six photographs on August 9, 1863 to inaugurate Alexander Gardner’s new gallery in Washington. “Lincoln had promised to be Gardner’s first sitter and chose Sunday for his visit to avoid ‘curiosity-seekers and other seekers” while on the way to the gallery” (Ostendorf). Lincoln’s secretary John Hay wrote in his diary: “I went down with the President to have his picture taken at Gardner’s. He was in very good spirits.” Six portrait were made at the session, but this example, kept by John Hay for himself, is the only known example. “From the Gardner Gallery sitting of August 9, 1863 emerges this previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality. It had remained lost, its existence unsuspected by historians until 1969. John Hay, the grandson of Lincoln’s secretary, John Hay, sought identification of the photograph and sent a copy to Lloyd Ostendorf for evaluation. It was clear that somehow this view from the sitting was not distributed commercially by the gallery, but had been retained only by the Hay family” (Ostendorf, Lincoln’s Photographs: A Complete Album, p. 360). Provenance: John Hay, Lincoln’s secretary and later secretary of state under McKinley. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-12944409439

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LINCOLN, Abraham

Published by Tandy-Thomas, New York (1905)

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Item Description: Tandy-Thomas, New York, 1905. hardcover. Extremely rare and beautiful set of the Presidential Edition, limited to only 50 copies. Lacking the 24th volume containing original documents. Edited by Nicolay & Hay. 12 volumes, bound in 23. Presidential Edition. 1 of only 50 copies printed. Extra illustrated edition with a profusion of fine engraved portraits, views and maps, photogravures, and facsimile letters. The frontispiece in each volume is an original color watercolor depicting a log cabin. Tall 8vo, superbly bound in full crimson morocco with lovely gilt floral devices on all boards and spines; ornate inner dentelles and green morocco doublures; green silk moire endpapers; uncut edges, top edge gilt. New York: Tandy-Thomas Company, (1905). Fine. Bookseller Inventory # 256401

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. ("A. Lincoln") in black ink on Executive Mansion, Washington, letterhead, March 18, 1863. 5" x 8", 1 page with integral leaf. Very good. Integral blank with an autograph endorsement signed by Holt and clerical endorsement from the Adjutant General's office. To Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt: Lincoln requests his Judge Advocate General to investigate the "Strong Mitigating Circumstances" surrounding the court-martial of a member of the West Point Class of 1861. "It is said Lieut. John Benson [Williams], of the 3rd regular infantry, as been sentenced by a Military Commission, to be dismissed the service. I have some reason to believe there are strong mitigating circumstances in his case, which the Commission perhaps, did not deem competent for them to consider, I will thank you to procure the record, examine it and report it to me. . ." Holt forwarded Lincoln's letter to the Adjutant General, noting that "No record or report in regard to [the Williams case] has been received at this office." The letter was returned to Holt, accompanied by the record of William's court-martial and docketed "Please see papers within." After studying the record, Holt made a lengthy report to Secretary of War Stanton, March 30, 1863, which survives in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library. Holt dismissed the "mitigating circumstances" referenced by Lincoln - Williams's supposedly "severe sickness" - and concluded that "It is evident that Lieut. Williams left his command on the battlefield and returned to Washington, without leave and in known violation of orders and of his duty. . . .[He] has shown himself disqualified for the profession of arms." On April 8th, Stanton, in turn forwarded Holt's deposition to the President, "as requested by his note on the 18th Ulto" (that is, the present letter). Lincoln ended the matter with his own terse endorsement on April 11th: "I decline to interfere in Behalf of Lieut. Williams" (Basler 4:169). Although referred to in Basler's note regarding Lincoln's endorsement, the present letter does not appear in "The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln". Inscribed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 604602

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Item Description: In January 1861, he acknowledges a private communication, originally sent by code, from his strongest supporter on-site, Abner Doubleday In 1858, Abner Doubleday was assigned to Fort Moultrie in Charleston harbor, a desirable posting because of its proximity to the city and its elegant society. By the summer of 1860, he was a captain and second in command of the fort, serving under Lt. Col. John Gardner, a Massachusetts man. Mary Doubleday, AbnerÕs wife, was with him and the only woman in the fort. At that time, history came right to their doorstep. The Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln as their presidential candidate in 1860, and because of their opponentsÕ split, were widely thought to have a good chance to win their first national election. Southerners were having no part of a potential Lincoln presidency. South Carolina went so far as to warn that if the Republicans won, it would withdraw from the Union. Doubleday warned of the Southern discontent and added that he was the only officer at Moultrie who favored Lincoln's election, but ÒAs regards my companions, however, there was no difference of opinion in regard to sustaining the new President should he be legally elected, and they were all both willing and anxious to defend the fort confided to their honor.Ó In the general election on November 8, the Republicans received a minority of the total popular vote, but the vote was distributed to give Lincoln all the electoral votes he needed to assume the office of president on March 4, 1861. The South Carolina General Assembly wasted no time and on November 10, 1860, called for a ÒConvention of the People of South CarolinaÓ to draw up an Ordinance of Secession. It also elected Francis Pickens as Governor. With South CarolinaÕs secession a foregone conclusion, people everywhere began to prepare for a widespread crisis. Lt. Col. Gardner in Fort Moultrie announced his intention to defend the fort to the last extremity against the secessionists. President BuchananÕs Secretary of War, John B. Floyd, a Southerner who would shortly serve as a Confederate general, was displeased with this position and relieved him of command. Just days after LincolnÕs election, Floyd replaced Gardner with Maj. Robert Anderson, a Southern sympathizing Kentuckian descended from one of the first families of Virginia (he was a cousin of Chief Justice John Marshall), and whose wife was a Georgian. Anderson believed that military action would never prevent secession, so many Northerners worried that putting him in charge of Charleston harbor at that moment was tantimount to treason. Of course, events would ultimately prove that both sideÕs advocates had misassessed AndersonÕs conduct when push came to shove. On December 18, 1860, the South Carolina Convention convened in Charleston's Institute Hall and a spirit of southern nationalism and secession filled the air. Two days later, the Ordinance of Secession was adopted on a roll call vote of 169-0. The cry at once went forth, "The Union is dissolved!" The momentous news was flashed by telegraph around the country and it caused a sensation everywhere. On December 25, the Convention issued a call to the other slaveholding states to secede also and join South Carolina in a Southern Confederacy. By then, the Charleston newspapers were filled with military recruiting ads and notices, all designed to augment and train the stateÕs armed forces in preparation for war. As Doubleday later wrote in his book ÒReminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-'61Ó, starting about a week before the Convention convened, Fort Moultrie was in the thick of the rush to war, as South Carolinians were calling for it to be turned over from Federal to state authorities. This infuriated Northern patriots on the scene, like DoubledayÕs wife Mary. ÒOn the 11th of December we had the good fortune to get our provisions from town without exciting observation.It was afterward stated in the papers that the captain of the schooner was. Bookseller Inventory # 9050

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Item Description: Baker & Godwin, New York, 1863. 8vo. (9 x 5 5/8 inches). 48pp. Publisher's lettered wrappers, publisher's ad on rear wrapper. (Minor wear to wrappers). Housed in a blue chemise and cloth slipcase. "Four score and seven years ago.": the earliest publication of the Gettysburg Address in book form, preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen-page pamphlet, The Gettysburg Solemnities, known in only three copies. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the bloody and pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [The Gettysburg Solemnities]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" (PMM). Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Howes E232, "b"; Monaghan 193; Grolier, American 100, 72 (note); Streeter Sale 1747; Sabin 23263; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 351; Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg, pp.191-204. Bookseller Inventory # 29034

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Washington, D.C. (1862)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1862. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Letter Signed as President, to Edwin Stanton. Washington, D.C., May 15, 1862. With Lincoln Autographed Endorsement Signed, December 15 1862, 4 p., with internal blank leaves, 5 x 8 in. On verso: Autograph Endorsement Signed by Lorenzo Thomas, May 15, 1862, and a second Lincoln Autograph Endorsement Signed, December 11, 1862. Lincoln runs into red tape as he advocates for Captain Symmes Gardner's renomination as assistant quartermaster. Lincoln adds two endorsements seven months after his initial letter to the Secretary of War, making this an exceedingly rare, triple-signed Lincoln letter. Complete Transcript Executive Mansion May 15, 1862Hon. Sec. of WarMy Dear SirCapt. Symmes Gardner, was nominated to the Senate as Assistant Quarter-Master, and rejected. My impression is that I directed his renomination, on information from Senators, that the rejection probably resulted from mistake. If there be such direction of mine on file, please send me the re-nomination at once. Yours truly A. LincolnIf there is a vacancy of Asst. Q. M. not already promised-let Capt. Gardner have it. Dec. 15, 1862 A. Lincoln[on verso]:If Gen. Meigs will say in writing that this re-nomination may properly be made, I will do it. A. Lincoln December 11, 1862[In Lorenzo Thomas's hand]This officer is a 1st Lieut 18 Infantry. He was nominated as Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain to fill an original Vacancy. He was rejected by the senate, and the vacancy filled by another officer. There is now no vacancy in the Quartermasters Department, to which he could be re-nominated. L Thomas/Adjt Gen/May 15, 1862Historical BackgroundLincoln expends a great deal of effort to secure Captain Symmes Gardner's reappointment as Assistant Quartermaster. Gardner, a Vermont native, joined the Army in New York on May 14, 1861 as a 1st lieutenant in the 18th Infantry. He was promoted to captain and assistant quartermaster on August 12, 1861, but his renomination was rejected by the Senate on February 2, 1862. This May letter of support directly from the president to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton failed to have the desired result. Stanton passed the letter on to Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas, who responded in an endorsement which was sent back to Lincoln: "This officer is a 1st Lieut 18 Infantry. He was nominated as Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain to fill an original Vacancy. He was rejected by the senate, and the vacancy filled by another officer. There is now no vacancy in the Quartermasters Department, to which he could be re-nominated. /L Thomas/Adjt Gen/May 15, 1862." Lincoln's request that Stanton help renominate Gardner was deferred immediately by Thomas (both on May 15, 1862), and seven months later, Lincoln's endorsement (directed back to Thomas) on December 11, as well as a second request directed to Stanton (December 15) were unsuccessful.We haven't been able to find the reason Gardner's initial rejection, nor his subsequent rejection after Lincoln's follow up notes. Gardner might have been stuck in a web of War Department or general Washington politicking. He did attain his former rank of captain again on June 30, 1863, but not adjutant general, before being "Dropped" from the Army on November 13, 1863.Lorenzo Thomas (1804 - 1875) was the adjutant general of the Union army. He attended West Point and fought in the second Seminole War. During the Civil War, he helped recruit African American soldiers. Thomas and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton disliked each other, and after the war, President Andrew Johnson tried to replace Stanton with Thomas. Stanton refused to vacate his office and had Thomas arrested, but dropped the charges once he realized that arresting Thomas would allow a court to review the Tenure of Office Act and play directly into Johnson's hands.Montgomery Meigs (1816 - 1892) Although born in Georgia, Meigs remained loyal to the United States and was the Quartermaster General d. (See website for full description). Autograph Letter Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22828

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Item Description: New York: Baker & Godwin, 1863., 1863. 48pp. Original printed wrappers. Wrappers lightly soiled. Text lightly dampstained. About very good. In a cloth clamshell case, gilt leather label. Rare first book-form appearance of Lincoln's magnificent Gettysburg Address. This edition was preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen- page pamphlet, THE GETTYSBURG SOLEMNITIES, known in only three copies. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the bloody and pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The WASHINGTON CHRONICLE of 18- 21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [THE GETTYSBURG SOLEMNITIES]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" - PMM. Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. HOWES E232, "b." MONAGHAN 193. GROLIER AMERICAN 100, 72 (note). STREETER SALE 1747. SABIN 23263. PRINTING AND THE MIND OF MAN 351 (ref). Garry Wills, LINCOLN AT GETTYSBURG, pp.191-204. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 49250A

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. ("Abraham Lincoln") in black ink on partially printed and accomplished in manuscript. Washington, DC, September 14, 1863. 7 1/2" x 9". Framed in a wooden frame, linen mat with fillets, halftone photograph of Lincoln, map of New York, and metal name plate. Framed size: 19 3/8" x 24 1/4". Document calling for a draft quota for the 11th District of New York. Lincoln's draft call of 1,945 troops for the 11th District, which includes Orange and Sullivan counties, issued not long after the July 1863 draft lottery sparked 5 days of rioting amongst New York City's German and Irish immigrants. Not located in Basler. Lincoln called a special cabinet meeting at 11 a.m. on September 14 to discuss decisions of certain judges releasing drafted men by writ of habeas corpus. (see Miers p. 207 "Lincoln Day by Day"). Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 604915

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1864. No Binding. Book Condition: Fine. ("A. Lincoln") in black ink and accomplished in Lincoln's hand. Washington, D.C., November 18, 1864. 7 9/16" x 2 3/4". Being check No. 14, payable to "Self" in the amount of $50.00, drawn on Riggs & Co. with lithographed vignette of the bank by Hatch & Co., 29 William St., New York. Discreet closed cancel puncture to center, else fine. Lincoln here withdraws fifty dollars, only ten days after he won his second United States Presidential election, defeating his former top general, Democratic candidate George B. McClellan, by a landslide. Five months later his would be assassinated. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 605152

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Item Description: Days after signing the first Conscription Act,Ê he writes, "The nomination fell, with many others, because the number nominated exceeded the law" On March 3, 1863, because of the great recruiting difficulties caused by the long duration and heavy toll of the war, the government passed the First Conscription Act, making all men between the ages of 20 to 45 liable to be called into service.Ê Service could, however, be avoided by paying $300 or hiring a substitute, a practice criticized as unfair to the poor.Ê It led to riots in New York City, when the working class subject to the draft caused mayhem, and Union Army troops fresh from Gettysburg had to he called to restore order in the city.At the same time as soldiers were in need, officers exceeded the number of places available by law.Ê At the start of the war, the creation of ad hoc units was not uncommon, at the head of which would sit an officer. As the war continued and a quick victory did not materialize, officers and their civil leadership gained more experience in the proper organization and maintenance of a military apparatus. This meant matching the number of recruits to the appropriate number of officers, and that appointments be made consistently and through proper channels. Ward Burnett was a New Yorker who had served with distinction in the military for years, most recently in the Mexican War.Ê However, he had not remained with the military after that, so there was a gap in his service of almost a decade.Ê In 1862, he was nominated for a position as Brigadier General, but the appointment did not materialize, the Union not having enough enlistees to sufficiently expand the officer corp. Following that, Burnett began a behind the scenes campaign to gain his appointment, evidently sending a Col. Diven to speak directly to President Lincoln on his behalf.Ê Lincoln held office hours from 1 until 3 PM at the White House on March 7, 1863.Ê During this time he saw Col. Diven.Ê When Diven left, he sat down and wrote directly to Burnett.Autograph Letter Signed, on Executive Mansion letterhead, Washington, March 7, 1863, to Burnett. "Col. Diven has just been with me seeking to remove a wrong impression which he supposes I might have of you, springing from a report he had once made in the New York Senate, as I understood him. I told him, as I now tell you, that I did not remember to have ever heard of the report, or any thing against you. As I remember, you were nominated last year, and the nomination fell, with many others, because the number nominated exceeded, the law. I call to mind no reason why you have not been re-nominated, except that you have not been in active service, while others more than sufficient to take all the places, have been. Yours truly A. Lincoln."Not content with this refusal, Burnett enlisted the support of New York Mayor George Opdyke, who wrote to Secretary of War Stanton in June requesting that Burnett be placed in command of a regiment. Stanton replied in this Letter Signed (included), Washington, June 20, 1863 to Mayor Opdyke, sayingÊthat if "such power be given to General Ward B. Burnett, to muster men into the United States service, as was given to the late Colonel Baker and others, I have to state, that the request having been considered by the Department, it is not deemed expedient to grant it, great inconvenience and prejudice to the service, having been experienced from irregular authority to muster in recruits. The Department is informed that the force of recruiting officers is amply sufficient to muster in the recruits as fast as is consistent with due examination and proper regard to the interests of the United States." In May 1861, Edward Baker, referenced in Stanton's letter, was authorized to organize a regiment.Ê Baker was a friend of Lincoln and fellow attorney in Illinois.Ê In October of that year, he was killed at the Battle of Ball's Bluff.ÊInterestingly, although Burnett was never given his commission, he served among the troops. Bookseller Inventory # 9743

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Washington, D.C. (1863)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1863. No binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Partially Printed Document Signed as President. Washington, D.C., June 30, 1863. 1p., 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. Lincoln signed this draft call establishing quotas for the State of Connecticut only two days before the massive bloodletting at the Battle of Gettysburg. Two weeks later in New York, a similar call led to four-day rioting, with widespread looting, arson, and murder. Complete TranscriptExecutive Mansion,Washington, D.C., June 30, 1863 I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy thereof, having taken into consideration the number of volunteers and militia furnished by and from the several States, including the State of Connecticut, and the period of service of said volunteers and militia since the commencements of the present rebellion, in order to equalize the numbers among the Districts of the said States, and having considered and allowed for the number already furnished as aforesaid, and the time of their service aforesaid, do hereby assign Two Thousand One Hundred and Sixty Two (2,162) as the first proportional part of the quota of troops to be furnished by the First District of the Connecticut under this, the first call made by me on the State of Connecticut, under the act approved March 3, 1863, entitled 'An Act for Enrolling and Calling out the National Forces, and for other purposes,' and, in pursuance of the act aforesaid, I order that a draft be made in the said First District of the State of Connecticut for the number of men herein assigned to said District, and Fifty Percent in addition. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this Thirtieth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States, the eighty-seventh. Abraham LincolnHistorical BackgroundThe first effective draft by the federal government, signed into law by President Lincoln on March 3, 1863, called for all men between the ages of 18 and 45 to be enrolled into local militia units and be available to be called into national service. The actual draft was managed by the states, which most often used a lottery system. The number of draftees required by Lincoln's order varied, and was difference between a district's quota and its number of volunteers. However, the system was ripe for abuse, and controversial, because it allowed a draftee to hire a substitute for $300. The inequities of the system resulted in four days of draft riots in New York City just two weeks after this order from Connecticut. Federal troops were called in and eventually restored order on July 16.ConditionVery good. Minor toning, folds and a few light wrinkles. Partly Printed Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22642

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LINCOLN, Abraham

Published by [n.p.],, Massachusetts: (1863)

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From: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books, ABAA (Sherman Oaks, CA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: [n.p.],, Massachusetts:, 1863. FIRST EDITION. Broadside. 28 x 20 inches. Mounted on cloth, folded in quarters, minor splitting a center fold; light soiling and edgewear with minor chips (without loss of text), very light annotations in ink on verso (visible to recto right margin). Overall an excellent example of this rare and important broadside. First printing of the first proclamation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday. This original broadside produced in Massachusetts is formatted in two halves, the top being Governor John A. Andrew's announcement of Lincoln's Proclamation dated July 27, 1863, and the bottom being Lincoln's actual proclamation dated July 15, 1863, announcing that August 6 shall be set aside as a National Day of Thanksgiving. Though the exact printing date is unknown, it can be assumed that it was printed within the week following July 27.Thanksgiving was observed as a holiday since colonial times and each state would set aside its own day for celebration. This proclamation was the first time that the holiday would be celebrated on a set day nationwide, making it the first observed Thanksgiving as a national holiday.Later the same year, on October 3, 1863, Lincoln made a second proclamation again announcing Thanksgiving as a holiday, but this time in November, a date closer to the time most states had been celebrating it in the past. This earlier proclamation is actually the first time Thanksgiving was given national status, but because the second proclamation was widely accepted, the knowledge of this earlier one has been somewhat forgotten, making this piece a rare and important document in the annals of American history.Though this broadside is for the State of Massachusetts, no other broadsides from any other states announcing this date are known to exist, and only three other copies of this rare document are located through OCLC. Bookseller Inventory # 11224

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Item Description: He became one of ShermanÕs corps commanders on the March to the Sea By 1860, Lincoln had become part of the national political scene due to his debates with Stephen A. Douglas and Cooper Union speech in New York. As the 1860 campaign got underway, he was mentioned for the presidency but was hardly considered a con- tender. However, many felt that he was a viable candidate for Vice-President on a ticket with William A. Seward running for the presidency. It was almost universally believed that the State Republican Convention of Illinois, meeting in Decatur, would present his name for that office to the National Convention in Chicago. On May 6, 1860 the largest step in LincolnÕs political career occurred as the Decatur convention convened at a hastily constructed wood and tent structure called ÔThe Wigwam.Õ The roof was so low that the heads of men as tall as Lincoln, when on the platform, almost touched the canvass roof. The seats were constructed of plank, staked on edge with boards laid over them. But despite the rough-hewn quality of the building, this was to be a momentous convention. John M. Palmer had always been a Democrat, but his anti-slavery position led him to help or- ganize the Illinois Republican Party. In 1856, he was president of the first Illinois Republican Convention, and was a delegate to the national convention in Philadelphia that nominated John C. Fremont. In 1860, he was a strong supporter of Abraham Lincoln and in Decatur for the con- vention. Also very much a presence was Richard Oglesby, a friend of LincolnÕs who was prepar- ing a surprise for the convention. Though the delegates thought the principal business was to nominate a candidate for governor, Oglesby decided to advance LincolnÕs presidential prospects by presenting him as a representative of free labor to show the possibilities that existed for poor men in a free State. So Oglesby and LincolnÕs cousin, John Hanks, went to a clearing John had made with Lincoln when they were splitting rails many years before. They took two of the rails from the area, took them to town, and hid the rails in OglesbyÕs barn until the day of the conven- tion. He talked with Palmer and a few other Republicans about the plan and decided that Hanks would take the rails into the convention. They made a banner and attached it to a board fastened across the top of the rails: ÒAbraham Lincoln, The Railsplitter Candidate, for President in 1860. Two rails from a lot of 3,000 made in 1830 by John Hanks and Abe Lincoln.Ó Things really started to get rolling at the convention. At a prearranged moment, Hanks carried the banner in. Palmer jumped to his feet with a resolution declaring that ÒAbraham Lincoln is the first choice of the Republican Party of Illinois for the presidency,Ó and instructing Òthe delegates to the Chicago convention to use all honorable means to secure the nomination and to cast the vote of the state as a unit for him.Ó Thomas Turner, a champion for Seward, bitterly attacked the resolution. Palmer followed with an impassioned speech for Lincoln, his resolu- tion was adopted, and such was the pro-Lincoln enthusiasm that ensued that the Wigwam was almost wrecked. The roof was cheered off the building as hats, canes, papers, etc. were thrown in the air. At the peak of this excitement, Lincoln could not be found. He was hunted for and discovered in the back room of a jewelry store, where he had wandered in and taken a nap on the couch. He was taken into the convention through a rear entrance, not fully realizing what was happening. He stood dazed for a few moments, but when asked if he had split those rails said, ÒGentlemen, John and I did split some rails down there, and if these are not the identical rails, we certainly made some quite as good.Ó At the national convention a few weeks later, as SewardÕs men were promoting the idea of having LincolnÕs name brought forward as a candi- date for vice president, they were confronted personally by Palmer who followe. Bookseller Inventory # 9161

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LINCOLN, Abraham

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Item Description: 1864. Signed Trade. LINCOLN, Abraham.Engraved document signed.Washington, DC: March 19, 1862.Fine Lincoln document signed as President, appointing Alexander M.C. Bishop as Assistant Paymaster to the Navy during the Civil War, countersigned by Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, with fragile embossed paper seal present.When Gideon Welles became Secretary of the Navy he was immediately faced with the loss of more than half of the officer corps—over 300 of whom either resigned or were dismissed as disloyal. Welles moved quickly to expand the navy, first by initiating a river fleet that would assist in the internal blockade of the Confederacy, and then by purchasing merchant vessels that could be converted rapidly into fighting ships.Document with a bit of spotting and toning. Lincoln's signature bold and fine. An excellent framed piece. Bookseller Inventory # 86854

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Item Description: Columbus: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860, 1860. Octavo. Publisher's brown blind-stamped cloth,gilt lettered spine. Blue cloth chemise and slipcase. A few spots of foxing to title page. Copies in the original cloth are commonly found in shabby condition, this one is remarkably fresh and unsullied. A fine copy. First edition of the text of the debates that were Lincoln's springboard to fame. The Lincoln–Douglas debates are unquestionably the most famous, and most important, of such confrontations to have been staged in the history of American politics. The candidates' sharp exchanges helped to polarise sectional attitudes towards slavery, and - although Lincoln lost the 1858 Illinois Senate race of which they were a part - the debates catapulted Lincoln towards the 1860 presidential nomination, and into the White House. The text of the Lincoln–Douglas Debates was set from Lincoln's own scrapbook - now in the Library of Congress - of clippings of the candidates' remarks as reported by the Chicago Press & Tribune (for the Republican Lincoln), and by the Chicago Times (for the Democrat Douglas). When published as a presidential campaign tool in April 1860, the collected speeches became a best-seller, and by the time of Lincoln's official nomination, some 30,000 copies were in circulation. Our copy is inscribed discreetly in pencil on one of the blank leaves at the end: "George Wolford/ May - 1860"; this is almost certainly the New York Republican Assemblyman of the same name who stood in the 81st New York State Legislature in 1858, giving this copy a marvellous contemporary resonance. A stunning copy of one of the most celebrated publications in American political history. Howes L388; Leroy, Mr. Lincoln's Book 15; Monaghan, Lincoln Bibliography 69; Monaghan, "The Lincoln–Douglas Debates," in Lincoln Herald 45:2–11; Pratt, "Lincoln Autographed Debates," in Manuscripts 6:194–201; Sabin 41156. Bookseller Inventory # 97989

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Item Description: Baker and Godwin, 1863. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. No Jacket. 1st Edition. Baker & Godwin, New York, 1863. 8vo. 48pp. "Four score and seven years ago.": the earliest publication of the Gettysburg Address in book form, preceded only by the exceptionally rare sixteen-page pamphlet, The Gettysburg Solemnities, known in only three copies. Bound in recent hardcover. Several pages attached with recent restoration paper stubs. Lincoln made his speech at the dedication of a cemetery on the Gettysburg battlefield some four months after the pivotal battle that turned the tide of the Civil War in favor of the Union. Lincoln's speech was preceded by an address from Edward Everett, the most famous orator of his day. Everett's speech took some ninety minutes to deliver, and is largely forgotten. Lincoln's speech, delivered in only a few minutes, is immortal. It is a supreme distillation of American values, and of the sacrifices necessary for the survival of liberty and freedom. "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet [The Gettysburg Solemnities]. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" (PMM). Lincoln's address appears on page 40, and parenthetical notes are added indicating "applause" and "long-continued applause." A diagram on page 32 gives the details of the Soldiers' National Cemetery at Gettysburg. Howes E232, "b"; Monaghan 193; Grolier, American 100, 72 (note); Streeter Sale 1747; Sabin 23263; cf. Printing and the Mind of Man 351; Garry Wills, Lincoln at Gettysburg, pp.191-204. Housed in a custom-made collector's slipcase. Bookseller Inventory # 1503132

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Lincoln, Abraham.

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Item Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. ("Abraham Lincoln"), in black ink, Washington, February 10, 1862. Folio. Partially printed document on vellum accomplished in a secretarial hand. Blue wafer seal intact. Lincoln's signature is dark. Appointment of Ethan A[llen] Hitchcock to the rank of Major General of Volunteers. Boldly co-signed by Edwin Stanton, Secretary of War, and Adjutant General L. Thomas (a few small holes at the folds, else fine, fresh and dark). Lincoln (1809-65), 16th President of the United States (1861-65) and one of the most important figures in American history. Hitchcock (1798-1870), Graduated West Point in 1817; served in Florida war; later with Winfield Scott in Mexico. He was commissioned Major-General of Volunteers (as per this document) in 1862 and rendered many valuable services to Lincoln's administration and the Union Army (see Basler's Lincoln for numerous references to him). Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 600008

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) BRADY, MATHEW

Published by Washington: Mathew Brady (1864)

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Item Description: Washington: Mathew Brady, 1864. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Photographed by Anthony Berger at Brady's Gallery, Washington, February 9, 1864. Oval albumen print, 8 1/8 x 6 1/8 in. Original printed mount captioned "PRESIDENT LINCOLN" with Brady & Co. imprint. Some soiling and offsetting to mount, some fading and marks to photograph. A handsome large-format photograph. THE CLASSIC BRADY FIVE DOLLAR BILL PHOTOGRAPH. This celebrated portrait, the basis for the five dollar bill engraving, is one of seven poses taken by Anthony Berger at Mathew Brady's Washington, D. C. studio on February 9, 1864. The most prolific photographer of Lincoln, Brady himself did not actually operate his cameras during the war years, instead training and employing men like Alexander Gardner and his successor Anthony Berger, who took this picture, to operate the camera. Lincoln's son Robert Todd Lincoln declared this famous portrait to be "the most satisfactory likeness" of Abraham Lincoln. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-13216697086

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Lincoln, Abraham, Edwin Stanton and Lyman Bridges

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Item Description: [Civil War Commission Document] Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) U.S President (1861-1865) Official Civil War commission document pictorially engraved on vellum with blue seal present. Presidential appointment of Lyman Bridges who had enlisted in June of 1861. This appointment, to rank of Major, was signed by the President Abraham Lincoln and counter-signed by Secretary of the War Edwin Stanton (1814-1869), dated March 22, 1865, just 25 days before Lincoln was assassinated and six days after Lee surrendered to Grant. Framed under glass (not examined out of frame). Document measures approx. 18 ½ " x 15". Frame measures 26" x 22". Upper left hand corner is recorder’s name and date in red ink. Signatures are fading, fold lines, Bookseller Inventory # 019261

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

Published by Washington, DC: 1863 (1863)

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Item Description: Washington, DC: 1863, 1863. Partly engraved military appointment on vellum with the sections accomplished in manuscript (445 × 330 mm). Mounted, framed and glazed with UV conservation glass in dark wood frame with gilt slip. Originally folded into sixths leaving light creases as usual - it was common to carry such documents as instruments of authority, or means of identification - with two very small losses at the confluence of the upper centre folds, some light soiling verso, Stanton's signature is faded to brown, Lincoln's still quite strong. Blue wafer seal at left, with one small chip, and War Department docketing notations at upper left. Attractive cartouche of the American eagle at the head, and large trophy of arms at the foot, engraved by by J. V. N. and O. H. Throop. The document appoints Carl Proegler as an Assistant Surgeon of Volunteers, effective from October 4, 1862, signed in full Lincoln and Stanton. This appointment was made four months before the Battle of Gettysburg. Dr. Proegler (1837-1907), was born in Cologne and educated Erlangen, Würzburg, and Berlin, graduating from the last in 1859, and studying in Paris and London the following year, before emigrating to the United States. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he broke off from the practice that he had established in New York and "offered his services to the Government and was appointed Junior Surgeon of a hospital in Washington, where he remained for a few months. He afterward served as surgeon of various regiments, including the Twenty-fifth New York Infantry, of which he had charge in his professional capacity for about ten months. At the close of the war Dr. Proegler entered the navy and was made Fleet Surgeon under General Farragut — a position which he filled until 1868" (Memorial Record of Northeastern Indian, p.225). Proegler returned to Germany during the Franco-Prussian War, but in 1872 came back to America and settled in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where "from the beginning he maintained a place among the most able practitioners of this section of the State", a member of the Allen County Medical Society, he was twice Secretary to the State Board of Health. Highly appealing military-medical Lincoln document from the Civil War. Bookseller Inventory # 90344

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS

Published by New York (1863)

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Item Description: New York, 1863. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. The World (illustrator). Newspaper, The World, New York, November 20, 1863. 8 pp., 15 3/8 x 23 in. ".It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln's timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed.This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln's speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett's speech, a report on the ceremonies, and a map of the "Great National Soldiers' Cemetery at Gettysburg." Partial Transcript"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. (Applause.) Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our power to add or detract. (Applause.) The world will little note nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. (Applause.) It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on. (Applause.) It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion: that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain (applause): that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that governments of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth. (Long continuous applause.)"The text is the Associated Press version, delivered by telegraph from the battlefield ceremonies. There are some slight variations between different newspapers and typesetters in terms of punctuation and capitalization, but the original AP version is easily identifiable by the use of the phrase "to the refinished work ." instead of the more appropriate "to the unfinished work."Additional differences between this and other versions of the text include:"We are met to dedicate" is "We have come to dedicate" in Lincoln's written copies.the word "poor," heard by some reporters and present in both of Lincoln's drafts, is excluded here: " far above our [poor] power to add or detract" "carried on" is found here and in Lincoln's second draft, but he replaced it with "advanced" in subsequent drafts: "have thus so far [so] nobly [carried on advanced]" For the full historical background of the Gettysburg Address click here. Newspaper. Bookseller Inventory # 22381

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Springfield, IL (1839)

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Item Description: Springfield, IL, 1839. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Document Signed. Legal Brief. [Springfield, Ill., April 16, 1839]. 1 p., 7 5/8 x 12 5/8 in. Complete TranscriptState of IllinoisSangamon County }sb2nd CircuitOf the July term of the Sangamon Circuit Court in the year of ourLord one thousand eight hundredand thirtynine-Moses Hoffman, plaintiff, complains of William H. Wernwag, defendant, being in custody &c of a plea in assumpsit: For that whereas heretofore, towit, on the [blank] day of [blank] in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirtynine at the county and circuit aforesaid, the said defendant was indebted to the said plaintiff in the sum of one hundred an[d] twentyeight dollars and sixtyfive cents lawful money of the United States, for the work and labour care and diligence of the said plaintiff, but him the said plaintiff before that time done performed and bestowed in and about the business of the said defendant, and for the said defendant, and at his special instance and request-And also for divers goods, wares and merchandize by the said plaintiff before that time sold and delivered to the said defendant, and at his like special instance and request; and being so indebted, he the said defendant, in consideration thereof, afterwards, towit, on the day and year aforesaid, at the county and circuit aforesaid undertook, and then and there faithfully promised, the said plaintiff to pay him the said sum of money when he the said defendant when he the said defendant should be there unto afterwards requested-Yet the said defendant (Although often requested so to do) hath not as yet paid to the said plaintiff the said sum of money or any part thereof, but so to do, hath hitherto wholly neglected and refused, and still doth neglect and refuse. To the damage of the said plaintiff of the sum of two hundred dollars, and there he sues &c. Stuart & Lincoln p .g.Docketing on verso:Moses Huffman vs} DeclnWilliam H. Wemway Filed June 28 1839Wm Butler clerkHistorical BackgroundWilliam H. Wernwag, nephew of the more famous bridge builder Louis Wernwag, was contracted to build a bridge over the Sangamon River at Carpenter's Ferry, a site north of Springfield, Illinois. After contracting with suppliers and laborers, he died, leaving many creditors in the lurch. Lincoln filed suit on behalf of at least three of the nine creditors who sued Wernwag's estate. Here, Lincoln files a plea in assumpsit, (taking on a promise, in this case, to pay) on behalf of Moses Hoffman, who claimed that Wernwag owed him $128.65 for goods and services.It is unknown whether or not Lincoln won this case, but he was forced to dismiss another of his cases against Wernwag's estate because Wernwag died deeply in debt. Considering that he introduced an "Act for the Relief of the Creditors of the late William Wernwag" in the Illinois Legislature on December 29, 1840, it is likely that even if he won on behalf of Hoffman, the estate had few assets from which Hoffman could recover damages. The relief bill relied on creditors petitioning the county commissioners for payment, and took effect February 27, 1841.Sources"Biog. of the Wernwag Family, Bridge Builders."http://genealogytrails.com/penn/philadelphia/phlbioswernwag.htmlWilliam E. Baringer, Lincoln Day by Day, A Chronology 1809-1865, Volume I (Dayton, Ohio: Morningside, 1991) pp. 108-110; 150.Laws of the State of Illinois Passed by the Twelfth General Assembly. (Springfield: Willia, Walters, 1841) pp. 212-213.http://books.google.com/books?id=CAs4AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA212&lpg=PA212&dq=William+Wernwa g&source=bl&ots=74HVjW6RrX&sig=E2LSbX1_tN5tzogLxrJOydsscTk&h l=en&sa=X&ei=4hj3UIiXGY_h0wHYzYH4BQ&ved=0CEoQ6AEwBjgK#v=onep age&q=William%20Wernwag&f=falseKay MacLean, The Broadwells of Clayville and Their Roots, Part II: Family Land Dealings in Illinois (Clayville Rural Life Center and Museum, Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois) pp. 24-25.https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/15358/Research . (See website for full description). Autograph Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22878

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Lincoln, Abraham; Douglas, Stephen A.

Published by Columbus, OH: Follett, Foster and Company (1860)

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Item Description: Columbus, OH: Follett, Foster and Company, 1860. Hard Cover. Book Condition: Near Fine. 1st Edition. First edition, first printing, first issue, without a line over the publisher's imprint on the verso of the title page, and "2" to the foot of page 17. Publisher's brown cloth, boards decoratively stamped in blind, spine lettered in gilt. Near fine, with the lightest touch of wear to extremities, fresh and unfaded cloth, spine gilt bright, contemporary former owner's inscriptions to the front endpapers and title page, bookplate to front pastedown, bright and clean interior. Overall, about fine and completely unsophisticated, the nicest we've seen. Howes L338. Monaghan 69. HBS 65543. Political Debates between Hon. Abraham Lincoln and Hon. Stephen Douglas collects the transcripts of the seven debates between Lincoln and Douglas held in Illinois from August 21 - October 15, 1858. When both men were running for Senate in Illinois, Lincoln challenged his Democratic opponent to a series of formal debates, which took place at Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton. In each city, one candidate would open with an hour speech, the other would respond with an hour and half response, and the first would conclude the debate with a thirty minute rebuttal. The main topic of the debates was slavery, particularly in regards to its legality in the American territories. Notably, in the second debate, which was held in Freeport, Douglas articulated his "Freeport Doctrine," which argued for using popular sovereignty as a means to determine whether or not a territory would allow slavery. Although Lincoln would lose the senatorial race, Douglas' support of the Kansas-Nebraska Act vis-à-vis the Freeport Doctrine directly contradicted the Dred Scott decision and caused a regional divide in the Democratic Party, thereby paving the way for Lincoln to win the 1860 presidential election. In addition to the "Great Debates," this volume includes Lincoln and Douglas speeches given earlier in the same year at Springfield and Chicago, which include Lincoln's memorable "The House Divided" speech, as well as the two men's correspondence prior to the debates. Notably, Political Debates was printed in 1860 to garner support for Lincoln in the presidential race. Bookseller Inventory # AHSD002

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: Soft cover. Book Condition: Very Good. in black ink as President, Washington, D.C., December 23, 1863. Six lines plus signature and date, on verso of the integral blank of an Autograph Letter Signed from General John M. Schofield, Washington, D.C., December 23, 1863. 8vo. 2 pages. Fine, fresh example, dark and clean. In his letter, Schofield addresses his commander in chief deferentially: "Mr. President, I desire simply to ask you if I may be absent from Washington a few days pending the settlement of my affairs, I wish to spend Christmas day with my relatives at West Point. If there is any reason for my remaining here of course I do not wish to go." On verso, Lincoln writes: "Not the slightest objection to Gen. Schofield's visiting West Point, so that he be in call by Telegraph." This letter serves as an interesting footnote to the long-simmering problem in Missouri, where Schofield had been in command. A slave state, Missouri had seethed with pro and anti-slavery conflicts, and was terrorized by armed bands of southern sympathizers. Schofield and the provisional governor had engaged in bitter jurisdictional quarrels until all factions finally united to criticize Schofield for his "high-handed" administration and demand his removal. In early December 1863, a congressman who had visited Missouri told Lincoln first hand of Schofield's increasing difficulties, prompting the President on December 11 to telegraph a simple order to Schofield: "Please come see me at once." After his White House interview, Lincoln recommended that Schofield be promoted to major general, transferred, and Rosecrans appointed to take his place. Lincoln's recommendation was quickly approved by the Senate. Schofield (1831-1906), Graduated West Point, 1853. In Missouri at the outbreak of the Civil War, he became chief of staff to Gen. Nathaniel Lyon and served until Lyon¿s death at the battle of Wilson's Creek, August 1861. Promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in November, he was engaged in field operations in Missouri and later commanded the Department of the Missouri as major-general. Assuming command of XXIII Corps in February 1864, he took part in Sherman's Atlanta campaign as one of the three army commanders and badly shattered Hool's confederate force at the fierce battle of Franlklin, Tenn. Moving the XXIII Corps to the mouth of the Cape Fear river, He occupied Wilmington, N.C., and effected a junction with Sherman at Goldsboro, March 23, 1865, for the final moves against Gen. J.E. Johnston. In the spring of 1868 served briefly as U.S. secretary of war. Promoted major-general, regular army, 1869, he commanded several departments successively and made the recommendations that led to the acquisition of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, as a naval base. Superintendent at West Point, 1876-81. Lincoln (1809-65), 16th President of the United States (1861-65) and one of the most important figures in American history. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 601017

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Lincoln, Abraham:

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Item Description: Elephant folio, @16" x 21". 8pp in two sheets. Unbound, printed in six columns per page, minor wear, small printer's flaw [not affecting Lincoln's Address, but a few letters of Everett's speech]. Very Good. "Immortal, one of the Supreme Utterances of the Principles of Democratic Freedom" [Printing and the Mind of Man 351]. The first appearances of the Gettysburg Address in print occurred in the Tribune and several other morning newspapers on November 20, 1863, the day after the ceremony at which Lincoln spoke. Priority is impossible to determine. The Tribune reports the entire proceedings, beginning at the top of column five, including the procession and invocation. Lincoln's Address appears at the bottom of column five and the top of page six. Everett's windy speech follows. Garry Wills's study of the Gettysburg Address discusses its textual variations (pp. 191-204, 261-263) and the surprising difficulty in determining exactly what Lincoln said. As printed here, it differs only slightly from the spoken version delineated by Wills. First, this printing refers to "that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion; the Wills version prints "the cause." Second, the last clause of the last sentence of our printing is: "and that governments of the people, by the people and for the people."; the Wills version prints "and that the government of the people." The Tribune text also differs from Wills's "final text" in a few ways. Though these differences are not major, they nevertheless illuminate Lincoln's uncanny ability to dramatize the power and immediacy of the experience: The Tribune's first sentence prints "upon this continent" rather than "on this continent"; The Tribune prints, "We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting-place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live" The Wills "final text" prints, "We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those. " The Tribune prints, "our power to add or detract" rather than "our poor power to add or detract." The Tribune prints "refinished work which they have thus far so nobly carried on," rather than "unfinished work which they have thus far so nobly advanced." The Tribune's last sentence prints "the dead," rather than "these dead"; "the nation," rather than "this nation"; and "government of the people, by the people, and for the people," rather than "government of the people, by the people, for the people.". Bookseller Inventory # 31608

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

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Item Description: 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. ("A. Lincoln") in black ink [Washington, DC], May 12, 1863, being 7 lines on the verso of the second leaf of an autograph letter to Lincoln from Robert Chester, Buffalo, May 9, 1863, 2 pages; 7 7/8" x 12 3/4", on a bifolium of blue-ruled paper, neatly reinforced at folds. Lincoln deals with an officer seeking "An Honorable Discharge & to Avoid a Dishonorable One." Robert Chester, who identifies himself as "late Capt. 17th Infantry, US Army," petitions the President: "I would most respectfully request a suspension of Special Orders No. 201, (Extract 4) by which I am dismissed the service of the United States. The reasons for such request are that my case has not been properly submitted to Your Excellency. I would respectfully ask that the order my be suspended until a Court of Inquiry, or Court Martial; can be convened, when I may have the opportunity to defend myself." Chester's appeal is joined by ten other prominent citizens of Buffalo, including her postmaster, one the justices of the city's Superior Court, and three Union officers hailing from the Bison City. Lincoln forwarded Chester's petition to Judge Advocate General Joseph Holt, directing him to "please examine & report on this case. The officer only seeks an honorable discharge, & to avoid a dishonorable one." Nothing further on the case is recorded, and Holt - influenced, perhaps, by the President's none-too-subtle insinuation - evidently found no merit to Chester's claim. See "The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln", ed. Basler, Supplement: 187. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 604601

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Lincoln, Abraham

Published by Washington, D.C., (1864)

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From: Quaker Hill Books (Redding, CT, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1864. 30 January 1864, seven lines plus signature and date on verso of a manuscript petition from James S. Henderson and 13 others, to His Excellency A. Lincoln, Calloway County, Missouri, 18 January 1864. 2 pages, 4to. The letter respectfully petitions President Lincoln on behalf of three young Confederates " now prisoners of war at Point Lookout." They were captured at the Battle of Black Water (near Vicksburg) after entering "the Rebel Army.in the fall of 1861." Now, they are "desirous to return to their homes.and comply with the Laws." They are "willing to take the necessary Oath." Lincoln as was so often his wont, is happy to comply, and writes: "Let these three young men take the oarth of Dec. * and be discharged. Also let J.J. Neal go to Point Lookout & return with these young men. A. Lincoln." The three here pardoned were among the 1700 Confederate prisoners taken in the Battle of Big Black River, 17 May 1863, in the late phases of General Grant;s Vicksburg campaign. Bookseller Inventory # 884614

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LINCOLN, Abraham (1809 - 1965)

Published by Sangamon County, Illinois (1842)

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From: Argosy Book Store, ABAA, ILAB (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: Sangamon County, Illinois, 1842. unbound. 2 pages (front and back), 12.25 x 7.25 inches, Sangamon County, Illinois, March 1, 1842. Signed "Logan & Lincoln PQ," the name of Lincoln's law firm -- a writ on behalf of Illinois lumber merchants William Porter, James Donnell, and Joseph P. Eagen, who were seeking restitution and damages from a debtor, Frederick A. Patterson, in part: ".For that whereas the said defendant.was indebted to the said plaintiffs in the sum of one hundred and twenty three dollars, and eighty five, for scanting, joists, sheeting, rafters, weatherboarding, flooring and other lumber.yet the said defendant although often requested to do so has not as yet paid the said sum of money." Tears along the folds, silked on the back, slight staining, signature slightly smudged. Very good(-) condition. Bookseller Inventory # 234068

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LINCOLN, Abraham, JOHNSON, Andrew, BOLTON, Capt. John T, OLDROYD, Osborn H.]

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From: Adrian Harrington Ltd, ABA, ILAB (Royal Tunbridge Wells, KENT, United Kingdom)

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Item Description: Six related items, all finely mounted, comprising; 1.Regimental Document, 1pp., 15 x 10 inches printed on heavy paper, handwritten in spaces, concerning the appointment of John T. Bolton to First Sargeant in the New Jersey Volunteers, 15th September 1862. Some creasing and folds, light soiling, very good. 2. [LINCOLN, Abraham] Document, 1pp., approx 19 x 16 printed on vellum, Presidential title, elaborately engraved with eagle above text and military apparatus below. Concerns the appointment of Bolton to Second Lieutenant in the Veteran Reserve Corps. Dated 1st August, 1864. Signed by President Lincoln and the Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton. Printed text, handwritten name and date. With blue wax seal, and marginal notes in red ink from Adjutant General's office, some light soiling, folding, creases, very good. 3. [JOHNSON, Andrew] Document, 1pp., approx 19 x 16 inches printed on vellum, Presidential title as above. Concerns the appointment of John T Bolton to First Lieutenant for gallant and meritous services during the war. Dated 10th May 1866. Signed by President Johnson (a stamped signature, as was his method due to a weakened hand) and Stanton as Secretary of War. Printed text, handwritten name and date. With blue wax seal, and marginal notes in red ink, some light soiling, area of browning to top left, folding creases with one small hole, very good. 4. [JOHNSON, Andrew] Document 1pp., as above in format, for the appointment of Bolton to Captain. Dated 11th July 1866. Stamped signature of President Johnson and Stanton as Secretary of War. 5. OLDROYD, Osborn H. Assassination of Abraham Lincoln. 1901. 8vo. pp. 305, with advert and folding map. Some creasing to first few leaves else very good in brown cloth, titled in gilt. First Edition. 6. OLDROYD, Osborn H. Typed letter. 1pp., dated 1914, addressed to Bolton, requesting first hand accounts of the assassination (Bolton was on duty at Ford's Theatre that evening). Signed by the author. The material is archivally mounted and collected in an elegant half-leather clamshell box in elephant folio size. A striking presentation. John T. Bolton was a respected soldier and this is a good documentation of his progression through the ranks. Bolton was present when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated and it is understood from the family that he had applied for a position in the president's personal security team and that this was being considered at the time of the assassination. Bookseller Inventory # 36857

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