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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) GARDNER, ALEXANDER

Published by Washington: Alexander Gardner, August 9, 1863 (1863)

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Item Description: Washington: Alexander Gardner, August 9, 1863, 1863. No Binding. Book Condition: Near Fine. "A previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality"-Ostendorf. Albumen print, retouched in the print, trimmed to oval, 15 x 12 in. Original mahogany frame. This is the only known example of this highly important large-format photograph of Lincoln, once owned by the President’s private secretary John Hay, taken one month after the Battle of Gettysburg. Lincoln sat for six photographs on August 9, 1863 to inaugurate Alexander Gardner’s new gallery in Washington. “Lincoln had promised to be Gardner’s first sitter and chose Sunday for his visit to avoid ‘curiosity-seekers and other seekers” while on the way to the gallery” (Ostendorf). Lincoln’s secretary John Hay wrote in his diary: “I went down with the President to have his picture taken at Gardner’s. He was in very good spirits.” Six portrait were made at the session, but this example, kept by John Hay for himself, is the only known example. “From the Gardner Gallery sitting of August 9, 1863 emerges this previously unknown portrait of exceptional quality. It had remained lost, its existence unsuspected by historians until 1969. John Hay, the grandson of Lincoln’s secretary, John Hay, sought identification of the photograph and sent a copy to Lloyd Ostendorf for evaluation. It was clear that somehow this view from the sitting was not distributed commercially by the gallery, but had been retained only by the Hay family” (Ostendorf, Lincoln’s Photographs: A Complete Album, p. 360). Provenance: John Hay, Lincoln’s secretary and later secretary of state under McKinley. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-12944409439

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Item Description: Washington, DC, 1864. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Endorsement Signed as President, to John D. Defrees, Washington, D.C., February 8, 1864. On verso of an excellent content Autograph Letter Signed by Defrees, February 7, 1864. Complete Transcript [Defrees to Lincoln] Washington Feby 7, 1864Mr. President: The last session of the 36th Congress proposed to so amend the Constitution of the U.S. as to prohibit any interference with slavery, (by the General Government) where it then existed. It was disregarded, and the slave states resorted to war to separate from the free states. Now, why not send a message to Congress recommending the passage of a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution forever prohibiting slavery in the States and territories? It would be your measure and would be passed by a two thirds vote, and, eventually, three fourths of the States, through their Legislatures, would consent to it. If not done very soon the proposition will be presented by the Democracy and claimed by them as their proposition. This may look strange to those who do not remember with what facility that party can change front. Is it not right in itself and the best way to end slavery! It would have a beneficial influence on our elections in the fall. Those who deny the justice of a second term to you are attempting to weaken the faith of the people in your plan of reorganizing the state Governments of the rebel states. They say, suppose a state does so change its constitution as to prohibit slavery, why may it not, in a few years, hereafter, change back again? The proposed amendment would answer that cavil [objection]. A single amendment, thus submitted to the Legislature of the several states, would not open the whole constitution to amendment-and no harm can come of it, even should it fail to receive the sanction of the constitutional number of states. If done, it would be in accordance with the mode provided by the constitution itself-to which no one could reasonably object. Many reasons could be given in its favor-but I only desire to call our attention to the subject, and not to trouble you with an argument. Should you submit such a proposition I think it would be heartily endorsed by our State Convention on the 22d. inst. I think it a great move on the political chess board. Very Respectfully Your friend Jno D. Defrees[Lincoln's response to Defrees:]"Our own friends have this under consideration now, and will do as much without a Message or with it. AL. February 8, 1864"Historical BackgroundJohn D. Defrees (1810-1882) bought the Indianapolis Journal in 1846 and founded a pro-Republican newspaper, the Atlas, in 1858. He was elected to the Indiana state Senate and tried (unsuccessfully) to gain the nomination for Indiana representative in Congress in 1858. By 1860, he was a major force in Indiana Republican politics. Lincoln named Defrees "Public Printer," the head of the Government Printing Office, where he remained a powerful supporter of Lincoln and the Republican agenda.Ending slavery became a war aim after Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. However, the proclamation was issued as a military order, and offered no permanent protection to the freedmen and women. Abolitionists had long advocated a constitutional amendment ending slavery. Defrees's concerns regarding the Democratic Party co-opting the issue of ending slavery is somewhat mystifying. Nearly a month earlier, on January 11, 1864, former Democratic Senator John B. Henderson of slave state Missouri submitted a resolution for an anti-slavery amendment. Despite having been reared in Virginia, Henderson was against slavery, and upon the outbreak of the war, he even changed party affiliations to Republican, and chose to serve the Union. He was elected to the Missouri State Convention where he opposed secession. He was also named brigadier general of the Missouri militia before being appointed to the Senate. Considering Defrees's placemen. (See website for full description). Autograph Endorsement Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 23199

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LINCOLN, Abraham; EVERETT, Edward

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Item Description: 1863. First Edition. (LINCOLN, Abraham) EVERETT, Edward. An Oration Delivered on the Battlefield of Gettysburg, (November 19, 1863) at the Consecration of the Cemetery Prepared for the Interment of the Remains of Those Who Fell in the Battles of July 1st, 2d, and 3d, 1863.New York: Baker & Godwin, 1863. Rare first edition of Lincoln’s magnificent Gettysburg Address, scrawled, according to legend, on scratch-paper and envelopes, corresponding almost exactly to the spoken version transcribed by Associated Press reporter Joseph L. Gilbert. The Gettysburg Address, a few short lines scrawled, according to legend, on scratch-paper and the backs of envelopes, is one of America's most cherished documents. As noted by David Mearns of the Library of Congress, "Touch any aspect of the Address and you touch a mystery"—one immersed in history. Before a large crowd assembled at Gettysburg, orator Edward Everett delivered his address as President Lincoln waited on the platform, occasionally "removing his speech and glancing over it before returning it to his pocket As Everett started back to his seat, Lincoln stood to clasp his hand and warmly congratulate him the 'flutter and motion of the crowd ceased the moment the President was on his feet Lincoln put on his steel-rimmed spectacles and glanced down at his pages. Though he had had but a brief time to prepare the address, he had devoted intense thought to his chosen theme for nearly a decade giving truth to the phrase 'all men are created equal 'Four score and seven years ago,' Lincoln began" (Goodwin, Team of Rivals , 585-6). This work paid "unforgettable justice to the thousands of young Americans who had struggled with incredible bravery" (Bruce Catton). "The Washington Chronicle of 18-21 November reported extensively on this ceremony and included a verbatim text of 'Edward Everett's Great Oration.' On the fourth day it noted in passing that the President had also made a speech, but gave no details. When it came to the separate publication on 22 November, Everett's 'Oration' was reprinted from the standing type, but Lincoln's speech had to be set up. It was tucked away as a final paragraph on page 16 of the pamphlet. It was similarly treated when the meanly produced leaflet was replaced by a 48-page booklet published by Baker and Godwin of New York in the same year" (PMM 351).Wills, 191-204; 261-263. Howes E233. Sabin 23263. Streeter 1747. Monaghan 193.Text very fresh with expert archival repair to title page not affecting text, expert restoration to spine and reinforcement to wrappers. An extremely good copy of this important Lincoln rarity. Bookseller Inventory # 101511

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Item Description: Autograph letter signed, 2 pages 8 x 5 inches, on Executive Mansion letterhead, with file dockets on verso of second leaf; lightly soiled at vertical crease. "Hon. Mr. Tracy, of Pennsylvania, is here saying that a Col. Allen McKean has been nominated, and confirmed by the Senate, and that his commission is withheld, upon a charge presented and pressed by Judge Wilmot, which charge is rather old, and was well known to Judge Wilmot when, two years ago, he wrote a letter, urging McKean to be a candidate for Congress. I believe this Senate also had knowledge of this charge. My estimate of Judge Wilmot was shown by my appointment of him to the Claims Court; and yet I do think his irritability, proceeding from bad health, is leading him to give us a good deal of unnecessary trouble. I think in this case, Mr. Tracy's wishes better be followed, unless there be something more serious than I have heard of." Allen McKean had joined the Republican party and been a candidate in several elections, both as a Republican and in 1862 as a member of the People's party. A popular politician and public servant, like both David Wilmot, and Representative Henry W. Tracy, he lived in Towanda. It seems that Wilmot, whom Lincoln appointed judge on the Court of Claims at the conclusion of his Senate term in 1863, had some grudge against McKean rooted in Pennsylvania politics. McKean's appointment as army paymaster was nevertheless approved, effective from 23 February 1864. Provenance: Elsie O. and Philip D. Sang collection. Ref. The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, ed. Basler, Supp.: 250. Bookseller Inventory # 23628

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Item Description: In January 1861, he acknowledges a private communication, originally sent by code, from his strongest supporter on-site, Abner Doubleday In 1858, Abner Doubleday was assigned to Fort Moultrie in Charleston harbor, a desirable posting because of its proximity to the city and its elegant society. By the summer of 1860, he was a captain and second in command of the fort, serving under Lt. Col. John Gardner, a Massachusetts man. Mary Doubleday, AbnerÕs wife, was with him and the only woman in the fort. At that time, history came right to their doorstep. The Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln as their presidential candidate in 1860, and because of their opponentsÕ split, were widely thought to have a good chance to win their first national election. Southerners were having no part of a potential Lincoln presidency. South Carolina went so far as to warn that if the Republicans won, it would withdraw from the Union. Doubleday warned of the Southern discontent and added that he was the only officer at Moultrie who favored Lincoln's election, but ÒAs regards my companions, however, there was no difference of opinion in regard to sustaining the new President should he be legally elected, and they were all both willing and anxious to defend the fort confided to their honor.Ó In the general election on November 8, the Republicans received a minority of the total popular vote, but the vote was distributed to give Lincoln all the electoral votes he needed to assume the office of president on March 4, 1861. The South Carolina General Assembly wasted no time and on November 10, 1860, called for a ÒConvention of the People of South CarolinaÓ to draw up an Ordinance of Secession. It also elected Francis Pickens as Governor. With South CarolinaÕs secession a foregone conclusion, people everywhere began to prepare for a widespread crisis. Lt. Col. Gardner in Fort Moultrie announced his intention to defend the fort to the last extremity against the secessionists. President BuchananÕs Secretary of War, John B. Floyd, a Southerner who would shortly serve as a Confederate general, was displeased with this position and relieved him of command. Just days after LincolnÕs election, Floyd replaced Gardner with Maj. Robert Anderson, a Southern sympathizing Kentuckian descended from one of the first families of Virginia (he was a cousin of Chief Justice John Marshall), and whose wife was a Georgian. Anderson believed that military action would never prevent secession, so many Northerners worried that putting him in charge of Charleston harbor at that moment was tantimount to treason. Of course, events would ultimately prove that both sideÕs advocates had misassessed AndersonÕs conduct when push came to shove. On December 18, 1860, the South Carolina Convention convened in Charleston's Institute Hall and a spirit of southern nationalism and secession filled the air. Two days later, the Ordinance of Secession was adopted on a roll call vote of 169-0. The cry at once went forth, "The Union is dissolved!" The momentous news was flashed by telegraph around the country and it caused a sensation everywhere. On December 25, the Convention issued a call to the other slaveholding states to secede also and join South Carolina in a Southern Confederacy. By then, the Charleston newspapers were filled with military recruiting ads and notices, all designed to augment and train the stateÕs armed forces in preparation for war. As Doubleday later wrote in his book ÒReminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-'61Ó, starting about a week before the Convention convened, Fort Moultrie was in the thick of the rush to war, as South Carolinians were calling for it to be turned over from Federal to state authorities. This infuriated Northern patriots on the scene, like DoubledayÕs wife Mary. ÒOn the 11th of December we had the good fortune to get our provisions from town without exciting observation.It was afterward stated in the papers that the captain of the schooner was. Bookseller Inventory # 9050

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Washington, D.C. (1862)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1862. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Letter Signed as President, to Edwin Stanton. Washington, D.C., May 15, 1862. With Lincoln Autographed Endorsement Signed, December 15 1862, 4 p., with internal blank leaves, 5 x 8 in. On verso: Autograph Endorsement Signed by Lorenzo Thomas, May 15, 1862, and a second Lincoln Autograph Endorsement Signed, December 11, 1862. Lincoln runs into red tape as he advocates for Captain Symmes Gardner's renomination as assistant quartermaster. Lincoln adds two endorsements seven months after his initial letter to the Secretary of War, making this an exceedingly rare, triple-signed Lincoln letter. Complete Transcript Executive Mansion May 15, 1862Hon. Sec. of WarMy Dear SirCapt. Symmes Gardner, was nominated to the Senate as Assistant Quarter-Master, and rejected. My impression is that I directed his renomination, on information from Senators, that the rejection probably resulted from mistake. If there be such direction of mine on file, please send me the re-nomination at once. Yours truly A. LincolnIf there is a vacancy of Asst. Q. M. not already promised-let Capt. Gardner have it. Dec. 15, 1862 A. Lincoln[on verso]:If Gen. Meigs will say in writing that this re-nomination may properly be made, I will do it. A. Lincoln December 11, 1862[In Lorenzo Thomas's hand]This officer is a 1st Lieut 18 Infantry. He was nominated as Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain to fill an original Vacancy. He was rejected by the senate, and the vacancy filled by another officer. There is now no vacancy in the Quartermasters Department, to which he could be re-nominated. L Thomas/Adjt Gen/May 15, 1862Historical BackgroundLincoln expends a great deal of effort to secure Captain Symmes Gardner's reappointment as Assistant Quartermaster. Gardner, a Vermont native, joined the Army in New York on May 14, 1861 as a 1st lieutenant in the 18th Infantry. He was promoted to captain and assistant quartermaster on August 12, 1861, but his renomination was rejected by the Senate on February 2, 1862. This May letter of support directly from the president to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton failed to have the desired result. Stanton passed the letter on to Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas, who responded in an endorsement which was sent back to Lincoln: "This officer is a 1st Lieut 18 Infantry. He was nominated as Assistant Quartermaster with the rank of Captain to fill an original Vacancy. He was rejected by the senate, and the vacancy filled by another officer. There is now no vacancy in the Quartermasters Department, to which he could be re-nominated. /L Thomas/Adjt Gen/May 15, 1862." Lincoln's request that Stanton help renominate Gardner was deferred immediately by Thomas (both on May 15, 1862), and seven months later, Lincoln's endorsement (directed back to Thomas) on December 11, as well as a second request directed to Stanton (December 15) were unsuccessful.We haven't been able to find the reason Gardner's initial rejection, nor his subsequent rejection after Lincoln's follow up notes. Gardner might have been stuck in a web of War Department or general Washington politicking. He did attain his former rank of captain again on June 30, 1863, but not adjutant general, before being "Dropped" from the Army on November 13, 1863.Lorenzo Thomas (1804 - 1875) was the adjutant general of the Union army. He attended West Point and fought in the second Seminole War. During the Civil War, he helped recruit African American soldiers. Thomas and Secretary of War Edwin Stanton disliked each other, and after the war, President Andrew Johnson tried to replace Stanton with Thomas. Stanton refused to vacate his office and had Thomas arrested, but dropped the charges once he realized that arresting Thomas would allow a court to review the Tenure of Office Act and play directly into Johnson's hands.Montgomery Meigs (1816 - 1892) Although born in Georgia, Meigs remained loyal to the United States and was the Quartermaster General d. (See website for full description). Autograph Letter Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22828

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

Published by Tandy-Thomas, New York (1905)

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Item Description: Tandy-Thomas, New York, 1905. hardcover. Book Condition: fine. Limited. Extremely rare and beautiful set of the Presidential Edition, limited to only 50 copies. Lacking the 24th volume containing original documents. Edited by Nicolay & Hay. 12 volumes, bound in 23. Presidential Edition. 1 of only 50 copies printed. Extra illustrated edition with a profusion of fine engraved portraits, views and maps, photogravures, and facsimile letters. The frontispiece in each volume is an original color watercolor depicting a log cabin. Tall 8vo, superbly bound in full crimson morocco with lovely gilt floral devices on all boards and spines; ornate inner dentelles and green morocco doublures; green silk moire endpapers; uncut edges, t.e.g. New York: Tandy-Thomas Company, (1905). Fine. Bookseller Inventory # 151807

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Item Description: Days after signing the first Conscription Act,Ê he writes, "The nomination fell, with many others, because the number nominated exceeded the law" On March 3, 1863, because of the great recruiting difficulties caused by the long duration and heavy toll of the war, the government passed the First Conscription Act, making all men between the ages of 20 to 45 liable to be called into service.Ê Service could, however, be avoided by paying $300 or hiring a substitute, a practice criticized as unfair to the poor.Ê It led to riots in New York City, when the working class subject to the draft caused mayhem, and Union Army troops fresh from Gettysburg had to he called to restore order in the city.At the same time as soldiers were in need, officers exceeded the number of places available by law.Ê At the start of the war, the creation of ad hoc units was not uncommon, at the head of which would sit an officer. As the war continued and a quick victory did not materialize, officers and their civil leadership gained more experience in the proper organization and maintenance of a military apparatus. This meant matching the number of recruits to the appropriate number of officers, and that appointments be made consistently and through proper channels. Ward Burnett was a New Yorker who had served with distinction in the military for years, most recently in the Mexican War.Ê However, he had not remained with the military after that, so there was a gap in his service of almost a decade.Ê In 1862, he was nominated for a position as Brigadier General, but the appointment did not materialize, the Union not having enough enlistees to sufficiently expand the officer corp. Following that, Burnett began a behind the scenes campaign to gain his appointment, evidently sending a Col. Diven to speak directly to President Lincoln on his behalf.Ê Lincoln held office hours from 1 until 3 PM at the White House on March 7, 1863.Ê During this time he saw Col. Diven.Ê When Diven left, he sat down and wrote directly to Burnett.Autograph Letter Signed, on Executive Mansion letterhead, Washington, March 7, 1863, to Burnett. "Col. Diven has just been with me seeking to remove a wrong impression which he supposes I might have of you, springing from a report he had once made in the New York Senate, as I understood him. I told him, as I now tell you, that I did not remember to have ever heard of the report, or any thing against you. As I remember, you were nominated last year, and the nomination fell, with many others, because the number nominated exceeded, the law. I call to mind no reason why you have not been re-nominated, except that you have not been in active service, while others more than sufficient to take all the places, have been. Yours truly A. Lincoln."Not content with this refusal, Burnett enlisted the support of New York Mayor George Opdyke, who wrote to Secretary of War Stanton in June requesting that Burnett be placed in command of a regiment. Stanton replied in this Letter Signed (included), Washington, June 20, 1863 to Mayor Opdyke, sayingÊthat if "such power be given to General Ward B. Burnett, to muster men into the United States service, as was given to the late Colonel Baker and others, I have to state, that the request having been considered by the Department, it is not deemed expedient to grant it, great inconvenience and prejudice to the service, having been experienced from irregular authority to muster in recruits. The Department is informed that the force of recruiting officers is amply sufficient to muster in the recruits as fast as is consistent with due examination and proper regard to the interests of the United States." In May 1861, Edward Baker, referenced in Stanton's letter, was authorized to organize a regiment.Ê Baker was a friend of Lincoln and fellow attorney in Illinois.Ê In October of that year, he was killed at the Battle of Ball's Bluff.ÊInterestingly, although Burnett was never given his commission, he served among the troops. Bookseller Inventory # 9743

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

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Item Description: 1864. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, co-signed by Secretary of State William H.Seward, August 8, 1864. A Lincoln-signed whaling ship sea letter - as much as 100 times scarcer than a Civil War military commission. President Lincoln gives permission for the whaler Almira to sail to the North Pacific. Partial Transcript"TO ALL WHO SHALL SEE THESE PRESENTS, GREETING: BE IT KNOWN, That leave and permission is hereby given to Abraham Osborn Jr master or commander of the Ship called Almira . lying at present in the port of Edgartown bound for Pacific Ocean laden and outfitted with Casks, Provisions, Ship's Stores, and Whaling Utensils for a Whaling voyage. to depart and proceed with the said Ship on his said voyage".Historical BackgroundThe whaling business, hazardous in the best of times, was beset by the threat of Confederate attacks during the Civil War. As a result, the whale-rich waters of the Bering Sea between Siberia and Alaska became a haven for whalers avoiding American waters. Sea letters such as this offered proof of nationality and some protection to a vessel in foreign waters, though they were of no help against Confederate raiders. The owners of the Almira had already lost one vessel to the feared Confederate raider Alabama. In 1865 the CSS Shenandoah destroyed 20 of the 58 Yankee whalers in the Bering Sea, most after Lee's surrender. The 362-ton Almira, commanded by a member of the Osborn shipping family of Martha's Vineyard, did return from her four-year voyage to the North Pacific, in October 1868. She brought back 1,310 barrels of whale oil, having already sent home 1,845 barrels of sperm oil and 70,000 pounds of whale bone. In 1871, after 49 years of plying the world's oceans, the Almira was stove by ice and lost in the Arctic.Additional Historical BackgroundAlmira of Edgartown 1822-1871 The whaling vessel Almira was a 362 ton ship built in 1822 near Edgartown, Massachusetts. She set sail on her first voyage to the Pacific Ocean on February 2, 1822. She worked the whaling grounds for two years under the command of a Captain Daggett, returning on May 8, 1824 with 2300 barrels of sperm oil. Almira was in her home port just four months before returning to the Pacific Ocean whaling grounds on September 9, 1824, under a new Captain, Abraham Osborn, who bought her not long after the trip. She again worked for two years, returning December 14, 1826 with another 2300 barrels of sperm oil. She laid over in port for two years before returning to the whaling grounds in the Pacific for three more trips, each with a different captain. Each trip lasted two-three years and netted about 2000 barrels of oil. In 1837 Almira set sail for New Zealand, returning in 1839 with 1200 barrels of whale oil, having sold 1100 in Bahia. She made five more trips to the Pacific Ocean whaling grounds between 1839 and 1858, under five different Captains, some trips lasting four years. She added whale bone to her bounty in 1847, carrying as much as 30,000 pounds on some voyages. On August 23, 1858 she sailed to the Indian Ocean. In three years she netted just 1500 barrels of sperm oil. Upon her return in May, 1861 the paper trail detailing her activities ends. She was still owned by Abraham Osborn, but nothing is written about her until August 8 1864. The whaling business in the best of times was hazardous, but during the Civil War whalers faced the additional danger of Confederate attacks. From June 22 to June 28, 1865, the Confederate Raider Shenandoah almost completely destroyed the American whaling fleet in the Arctic, burning 20 ships and capturing 4 more. During the war, many privately owned whaling vessels avoided American waters for fear of being confiscated. Many went to a foreign port, or stayed in an isolated location, only to resume their business after the war. In August, 1864 the Almira traveled to the North Pacific Ocean under Captain Osborn. She returned in October,1868 with 1310 . (See website for full description). Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 4325

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Washington, D.C. (1863)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1863. No binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Partially Printed Document Signed as President. Washington, D.C., June 30, 1863. 1p., 7 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. Lincoln signed this draft call establishing quotas for the State of Connecticut only two days before the massive bloodletting at the Battle of Gettysburg. Two weeks later in New York, a similar call led to four-day rioting, with widespread looting, arson, and murder. Complete TranscriptExecutive Mansion,Washington, D.C., June 30, 1863 I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy thereof, having taken into consideration the number of volunteers and militia furnished by and from the several States, including the State of Connecticut, and the period of service of said volunteers and militia since the commencements of the present rebellion, in order to equalize the numbers among the Districts of the said States, and having considered and allowed for the number already furnished as aforesaid, and the time of their service aforesaid, do hereby assign Two Thousand One Hundred and Sixty Two (2,162) as the first proportional part of the quota of troops to be furnished by the First District of the Connecticut under this, the first call made by me on the State of Connecticut, under the act approved March 3, 1863, entitled 'An Act for Enrolling and Calling out the National Forces, and for other purposes,' and, in pursuance of the act aforesaid, I order that a draft be made in the said First District of the State of Connecticut for the number of men herein assigned to said District, and Fifty Percent in addition. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this Thirtieth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States, the eighty-seventh. Abraham LincolnHistorical BackgroundThe first effective draft by the federal government, signed into law by President Lincoln on March 3, 1863, called for all men between the ages of 18 and 45 to be enrolled into local militia units and be available to be called into national service. The actual draft was managed by the states, which most often used a lottery system. The number of draftees required by Lincoln's order varied, and was difference between a district's quota and its number of volunteers. However, the system was ripe for abuse, and controversial, because it allowed a draftee to hire a substitute for $300. The inequities of the system resulted in four days of draft riots in New York City just two weeks after this order from Connecticut. Federal troops were called in and eventually restored order on July 16.ConditionVery good. Minor toning, folds and a few light wrinkles. Partly Printed Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22642

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM] .

Published by n.p. [Boston]: [John Murray Forbes], [1862] (1862)

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Item Description: n.p. [Boston]: [John Murray Forbes], [1862], 1862. First edition in book or pamphlet form; 32mo.; 7 pages; wrappers; Monaghan 147; Eberstadt 7: "The only edition of the preliminary proclamation issued in pamphlet form." Slight creasing; a fine copy of a rare book. Issued by Boston industrialist John Murray Forbes, said to be one of a million copies printed for distribution to blacks by Union troops (see Letters and Recollections of John Murray Forbes. Boston, 1899). That number seems highly unlikely given the booklet's rarity; Eberstadt located six copies, including his own; six copies are located by OCLC; only two have appeared at auction in the last 25 years, and we have seen fewer than a handful elsewhere in the market. The Proclamation freed slaves only in those states, or parts of those states, which were in rebellion to the Union; a controversial half-measure: half too much for conservatives; half too little for abolitionists. While of doubtful constitutionality (a defect cured by eventual amendment), it was an important strategic, political and moral decision by Lincoln in secret from his divided cabinet. It did have the effect of undercutting foreign support for the Confederacy, particularly by the cotton-hungry British, and it eventually led to the recruitment of black Union regiments. Forbes was an abolitionist who contributed to raising those troops, including the famous 54th Massachusetts Volunteers. Bookseller Inventory # 21531

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LINCOLN, Abraham

Published by [n.p.],, Massachusetts: (1863)

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Item Description: [n.p.],, Massachusetts:, 1863. FIRST EDITION. Broadside. 28 x 20 inches. Mounted on cloth, folded in quarters, minor splitting a center fold; light soiling and edgewear with minor chips (without loss of text), very light annotations in ink on verso (visible to recto right margin). Overall an excellent example of this rare and important broadside. First printing of the first proclamation of Thanksgiving as a national holiday. This original broadside produced in Massachusetts is formatted in two halves, the top being Governor John A. Andrew's announcement of Lincoln's Proclamation dated July 27, 1863, and the bottom being Lincoln's actual proclamation dated July 15, 1863, announcing that August 6 shall be set aside as a National Day of Thanksgiving. Though the exact printing date is unknown, it can be assumed that it was printed within the week following July 27.Thanksgiving was observed as a holiday since colonial times and each state would set aside its own day for celebration. This proclamation was the first time that the holiday would be celebrated on a set day nationwide, making it the first observed Thanksgiving as a national holiday.Later the same year, on October 3, 1863, Lincoln made a second proclamation again announcing Thanksgiving as a holiday, but this time in November, a date closer to the time most states had been celebrating it in the past. This earlier proclamation is actually the first time Thanksgiving was given national status, but because the second proclamation was widely accepted, the knowledge of this earlier one has been somewhat forgotten, making this piece a rare and important document in the annals of American history.Though this broadside is for the State of Massachusetts, no other broadsides from any other states announcing this date are known to exist, and only three other copies of this rare document are located through OCLC. Bookseller Inventory # 11224

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Item Description: He became one of ShermanÕs corps commanders on the March to the Sea By 1860, Lincoln had become part of the national political scene due to his debates with Stephen A. Douglas and Cooper Union speech in New York. As the 1860 campaign got underway, he was mentioned for the presidency but was hardly considered a con- tender. However, many felt that he was a viable candidate for Vice-President on a ticket with William A. Seward running for the presidency. It was almost universally believed that the State Republican Convention of Illinois, meeting in Decatur, would present his name for that office to the National Convention in Chicago. On May 6, 1860 the largest step in LincolnÕs political career occurred as the Decatur convention convened at a hastily constructed wood and tent structure called ÔThe Wigwam.Õ The roof was so low that the heads of men as tall as Lincoln, when on the platform, almost touched the canvass roof. The seats were constructed of plank, staked on edge with boards laid over them. But despite the rough-hewn quality of the building, this was to be a momentous convention. John M. Palmer had always been a Democrat, but his anti-slavery position led him to help or- ganize the Illinois Republican Party. In 1856, he was president of the first Illinois Republican Convention, and was a delegate to the national convention in Philadelphia that nominated John C. Fremont. In 1860, he was a strong supporter of Abraham Lincoln and in Decatur for the con- vention. Also very much a presence was Richard Oglesby, a friend of LincolnÕs who was prepar- ing a surprise for the convention. Though the delegates thought the principal business was to nominate a candidate for governor, Oglesby decided to advance LincolnÕs presidential prospects by presenting him as a representative of free labor to show the possibilities that existed for poor men in a free State. So Oglesby and LincolnÕs cousin, John Hanks, went to a clearing John had made with Lincoln when they were splitting rails many years before. They took two of the rails from the area, took them to town, and hid the rails in OglesbyÕs barn until the day of the conven- tion. He talked with Palmer and a few other Republicans about the plan and decided that Hanks would take the rails into the convention. They made a banner and attached it to a board fastened across the top of the rails: ÒAbraham Lincoln, The Railsplitter Candidate, for President in 1860. Two rails from a lot of 3,000 made in 1830 by John Hanks and Abe Lincoln.Ó Things really started to get rolling at the convention. At a prearranged moment, Hanks carried the banner in. Palmer jumped to his feet with a resolution declaring that ÒAbraham Lincoln is the first choice of the Republican Party of Illinois for the presidency,Ó and instructing Òthe delegates to the Chicago convention to use all honorable means to secure the nomination and to cast the vote of the state as a unit for him.Ó Thomas Turner, a champion for Seward, bitterly attacked the resolution. Palmer followed with an impassioned speech for Lincoln, his resolu- tion was adopted, and such was the pro-Lincoln enthusiasm that ensued that the Wigwam was almost wrecked. The roof was cheered off the building as hats, canes, papers, etc. were thrown in the air. At the peak of this excitement, Lincoln could not be found. He was hunted for and discovered in the back room of a jewelry store, where he had wandered in and taken a nap on the couch. He was taken into the convention through a rear entrance, not fully realizing what was happening. He stood dazed for a few moments, but when asked if he had split those rails said, ÒGentlemen, John and I did split some rails down there, and if these are not the identical rails, we certainly made some quite as good.Ó At the national convention a few weeks later, as SewardÕs men were promoting the idea of having LincolnÕs name brought forward as a candi- date for vice president, they were confronted personally by Palmer who followe. Bookseller Inventory # 9161

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Lincoln, Abraham]:

Published by [Springfield, Il. June 26, 1857]. (1857)

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Item Description: [Springfield, Il. June 26, 1857]., 1857. 7pp. printed in double-column format. Quarto. Single sheet folded twice, uncut. A fine copy, with the bookplate of James Copley on the blank p.8. In a blue half morocco and cloth case. This speech, delivered on June 26, 1857 in Springfield, Illinois, was a defining moment in Lincoln's political career, propelling him toward his famous run for the Senate against Stephen A. Douglas the following year. It came in direct response to a speech Douglas gave two weeks earlier on Kansas and slavery, the Dred Scott decision, and Utah. In it Lincoln replies to the same burning issues. A sympathetic journalist who was present wrote: "There was no rant - no fustian - no bombast, but there was something in it of more force and power than these; the heart-felt.clothed in the eternal maxims of the purest reasons." Historians since have seen the speech as the real beginning of the Lincoln-Douglas debates during the campaign of 1858. Gerald M. Capers observed that those speeches were ".but forensic repetitions of the points they had already made." David Herbert Donald calls Lincoln's address "powerful," and says that his reaction to the Dred Scott decision marked a significant turning point in his views on constitutional issues: "never again did he give deference to the ruling of the Supreme Court." Lincoln attacked the Dred Scott decision on two bases. First, he claimed it was based on a misunderstanding of historical principles and the intentions of the Founders, asserting that the heavily Southern Supreme Court had bent the meaning of the Constitution to suit their prejudices. He noted that the Court had reversed itself on previous decisions and suggested so ill-founded an argument could not stand. Second, he argued that a decision that went so manifestly against the will of the people could not stand. Taking the opportunity to clarify his position on slavery, Lincoln rails against Douglas' claim that those who argue blacks are covered by the Constitution "do so only because they want to vote, eat, and sleep, and marry with negroes!" Chief Justice Taney had argued in Dred Scott that those imported to be slaves, whether free or not, were not among those envisioned as "equal" in the Declaration of Independence. Lincoln refuted this, but in a qualified form which well demonstrates the evolution of his thought to this point: "I protest against the counterfeit logic which concludes that, because I do not want a black woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. I need not have her for either. In some respects, she certainly is not my equal; but in her natural right to eat the bread she earns with her own hands, she is my equal, and the equal of all others." Lincoln also discusses Douglas' opinions on the Kansas question and the "Mormon War" in Utah. On the matter of Utah, he exposes Douglas' favored revocation of territorial status as a ruse to attach the region to a territory where the slavery question is settled by its inhabitants. On Kansas, he continues to attack Douglas' popular sovereignty principle, arguing that the spread of slavery westward would undermine all of the previous compromises which had held the Union together. Given almost a year before his famous "A House Divided" speech, this marked a dramatic step forward in Lincoln's quest for the Republican Senate nomination. His considerable stage presence and coruscating oratory helped make the speech a tremendous success. The ILLINOIS STATE JOURNAL advertised copies of the speech for sale, while at least two papers (the ILLINOIS STATE CHRONICLE and the CLINTON CENTRAL TRANSCRIPT) printed the text in full. This is the first issue of this separate printing, with Lincoln's first name misspelled; Monaghan records a similar later printing, with Lincoln's name spelled correctly in the title. This pamphlet is extremely rare in the market. The only one we know of to sell in the last twenty years is the copy the Eberstadts offered in 1964, which we later sold to a private collecto. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 42130

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM

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Item Description: Book Condition: Very Good. As President during the Civil War, Lincoln answers a letter addressed to him by Judge James Hughes (1823 -1873) regarding Major Casper Crowninshield (1837-97) who commanded the 2d Regiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Cavalry. In full: "Major Crowninshield is directed as above, unless it will interfere with the military orders, under which he is acting, or in his judgment, is dangerous, or improper." The President signs, " A. Lincoln - March 2. 1864." Judge James Hughes was appointed to the U. S. Court of Claims in January 1860, served to December 1864, then became a member of the Indiana House of Representatives until 1866. He asked Lincoln to provide armed escorts to recover a dead soldier from the battlefield. In full. "Mr. President, Will you be pleased to write on the margin of the letter herewith sent or write below this, a note of request, or an order to major Crowninshield, commanding the 2nd Mass. Cavalry, to furnish the bearer, the necessary guides and escort to recover the body and oblige." Signed, "James Hughes.". Bookseller Inventory # 2402

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Washington, D.C. (1864)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1864. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Document Signed, as President, countersigned by Secretary of State William H. Seward, Washington, D.C., May 10, 1864. 2 pp. 10 3/4 x 16 3/4". Lincoln pardons Alfred Ryder, a prisoner in New York's Sing Sing prison. Ryder promptly enlisted in the Union navy, only to desert a year after the war ended. Partial Transcript"Whereas . one Alfred Ryder was convicted of Mutiny and sentenced to imprisonment for seven years; And whereas, the said Ryder has now suffered nearly four years of his sentence, and his conduct in confinement has been uniformly exemplary.Now, therefore, be it known, that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, in consideration of the premises, divers other good and sufficient reasons . have granted and do hereby grant unto him . a full and unconditional pardon ." Historical BackgroundOn May 23, 1860 a revolt broke out on board the ship Wm. F. Storer off Governors Island, New York. Several men demanded that the captain open the forecastle, where they likely stashed liquor. "I'll see you d-d arse, you old gray-headed son of a b-h," Ryder cursed the captain. A melee ensued with Ryder and others shooting at the officers. The ship's steward was killed. The ringleaders, including Ryder, were given seven-year prison terms. On sentencing, the judge called the incident "one of the most disgraceful and outrageous [affrays] that has happened in the harbor of New-York." Ryder served less than four years of his sentence before being pardoned. Lincoln's generosity with pardons was well known. He denied every application to execute sentries for sleeping at their posts. In one 1864 order alone, he revoked 60 death sentences. Attorney General Bates lamented that "in nine cases out of ten," a woman's tears were "sure to prevail in winning clemency." History has tended to sympathize with Lincoln's compassion, but his generals complained that it undermined discipline and encouraged desertion. Additional Historical BackgroundThe Wm. F. Storer, was a packet-ship built in Waldoboro, Maine in 1856 by Storer and Comery. Between 1859 and 1863 she brought over a thousand immigrants to the U.S. The ship was owned in New York by Trask and Dearborn and had just embarked for Liverpool, England when the confrontation occurred. In his deposition Captain Benjamin J. H. Trask, said, "it is customary to lock the forecastle when leaving port when it is suspected that the crew have liquor concealed there." After quarreling began, Capt. Trask appeared on the deck and stated that the men "did not want it open while weighing anchor." Prominent (even foremost) among these, was Alfred Ryder, who said: "we do want it open; will you open it?" but was ordered by the Captain: "No; go to your work." After threatening and cursing the captain, Ryder was ordered put in chains. The fighting continued with Capt. Trask narrowly escaping the pistol fire of Ryder, James Dillon, and Robert Craig, and the carpenter's edge tools and rigging spikes in the hands of George Beecher, James Brown, George Cross, Joseph McDonald, and William Smith. The captain remained besieged in his cabin until the Harbor Police arrived. In the melee, the Steward, Andrew H. Mitchell, 47, was killed, leaving a wife and family. It is not clear which man or men caused the fatal blow(s) to Mitchell - "a fractured skull.a considerable portion.having been crushed in" - but the ringleaders, Ryder, Dillon, and Craig or Smith, were given seven year sentences by Judge Smalley whose outrage at the "affray" was proclaimed at the sentencing of Dillon.Ryder appears in the 1860 census at Sing Sing (Ossining, NY), from which we learn that he was born ca. 1837 in Scotland. He is likely the "Alfred Rider" who enlisted May 21, 1864 (eleven days after this pardon) as a seaman in the Union Navy. He deserted May 21, 1866. Lincoln issued twice as many pardons as his predecessor, James Buchanan, granting clemency to some 331 prisoners convict. (See website for full description). Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 13446

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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.) BRADY, MATHEW

Published by Washington: Mathew Brady (1864)

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Item Description: Washington: Mathew Brady, 1864. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Photographed by Anthony Berger at Brady's Gallery, Washington, February 9, 1864. Oval albumen print, 8 1/8 x 6 1/8 in. Original printed mount captioned "PRESIDENT LINCOLN" with Brady & Co. imprint. Some soiling and offsetting to mount, some fading and marks to photograph. A handsome large-format photograph. THE CLASSIC BRADY FIVE DOLLAR BILL PHOTOGRAPH. This celebrated portrait, the basis for the five dollar bill engraving, is one of seven poses taken by Anthony Berger at Mathew Brady's Washington, D. C. studio on February 9, 1864. The most prolific photographer of Lincoln, Brady himself did not actually operate his cameras during the war years, instead training and employing men like Alexander Gardner and his successor Anthony Berger, who took this picture, to operate the camera. Lincoln's son Robert Todd Lincoln declared this famous portrait to be "the most satisfactory likeness" of Abraham Lincoln. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-13216697086

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Lincoln, Abraham, Edwin Stanton and Lyman Bridges

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Item Description: [Civil War Commission Document] Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) U.S President (1861-1865) Official Civil War commission document pictorially engraved on vellum with blue seal present. Presidential appointment of Lyman Bridges who had enlisted in June of 1861. This appointment, to rank of Major, was signed by the President Abraham Lincoln and counter-signed by Secretary of the War Edwin Stanton (1814-1869), dated March 22, 1865, just 25 days before Lincoln was assassinated and six days after Lee surrendered to Grant. Framed under glass (not examined out of frame). Document measures approx. 18 ½ " x 15". Frame measures 26" x 22". Upper left hand corner is recorder’s name and date in red ink. Signatures are fading, fold lines, Bookseller Inventory # 019261

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by Springfield, IL (1839)

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Item Description: Springfield, IL, 1839. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. Autograph Document Signed. Legal Brief. [Springfield, Ill., April 16, 1839]. 1 p., 7 5/8 x 12 5/8 in. Complete TranscriptState of IllinoisSangamon County }sb2nd CircuitOf the July term of the Sangamon Circuit Court in the year of ourLord one thousand eight hundredand thirtynine-Moses Hoffman, plaintiff, complains of William H. Wernwag, defendant, being in custody &c of a plea in assumpsit: For that whereas heretofore, towit, on the [blank] day of [blank] in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirtynine at the county and circuit aforesaid, the said defendant was indebted to the said plaintiff in the sum of one hundred an[d] twentyeight dollars and sixtyfive cents lawful money of the United States, for the work and labour care and diligence of the said plaintiff, but him the said plaintiff before that time done performed and bestowed in and about the business of the said defendant, and for the said defendant, and at his special instance and request-And also for divers goods, wares and merchandize by the said plaintiff before that time sold and delivered to the said defendant, and at his like special instance and request; and being so indebted, he the said defendant, in consideration thereof, afterwards, towit, on the day and year aforesaid, at the county and circuit aforesaid undertook, and then and there faithfully promised, the said plaintiff to pay him the said sum of money when he the said defendant when he the said defendant should be there unto afterwards requested-Yet the said defendant (Although often requested so to do) hath not as yet paid to the said plaintiff the said sum of money or any part thereof, but so to do, hath hitherto wholly neglected and refused, and still doth neglect and refuse. To the damage of the said plaintiff of the sum of two hundred dollars, and there he sues &c. Stuart & Lincoln p .g.Docketing on verso:Moses Huffman vs} DeclnWilliam H. Wemway Filed June 28 1839Wm Butler clerkHistorical BackgroundWilliam H. Wernwag, nephew of the more famous bridge builder Louis Wernwag, was contracted to build a bridge over the Sangamon River at Carpenter's Ferry, a site north of Springfield, Illinois. After contracting with suppliers and laborers, he died, leaving many creditors in the lurch. Lincoln filed suit on behalf of at least three of the nine creditors who sued Wernwag's estate. Here, Lincoln files a plea in assumpsit, (taking on a promise, in this case, to pay) on behalf of Moses Hoffman, who claimed that Wernwag owed him $128.65 for goods and services.It is unknown whether or not Lincoln won this case, but he was forced to dismiss another of his cases against Wernwag's estate because Wernwag died deeply in debt. Considering that he introduced an "Act for the Relief of the Creditors of the late William Wernwag" in the Illinois Legislature on December 29, 1840, it is likely that even if he won on behalf of Hoffman, the estate had few assets from which Hoffman could recover damages. The relief bill relied on creditors petitioning the county commissioners for payment, and took effect February 27, 1841.Sources"Biog. of the Wernwag Family, Bridge Builders."http://genealogytrails.com/penn/philadelphia/phlbioswernwag.htmlWilliam E. Baringer, Lincoln Day by Day, A Chronology 1809-1865, Volume I (Dayton, Ohio: Morningside, 1991) pp. 108-110; 150.Laws of the State of Illinois Passed by the Twelfth General Assembly. (Springfield: Willia, Walters, 1841) pp. 212-213.http://books.google.com/books?id=CAs4AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA212&lpg=PA212&dq=William+Wernwa g&source=bl&ots=74HVjW6RrX&sig=E2LSbX1_tN5tzogLxrJOydsscTk&h l=en&sa=X&ei=4hj3UIiXGY_h0wHYzYH4BQ&ved=0CEoQ6AEwBjgK#v=onep age&q=William%20Wernwag&f=falseKay MacLean, The Broadwells of Clayville and Their Roots, Part II: Family Land Dealings in Illinois (Clayville Rural Life Center and Museum, Sangamon State University, Springfield, Illinois) pp. 24-25.https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/15358/Research . (See website for full description). Autograph Document Signed. Bookseller Inventory # 22878

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LINCOLN, Abraham.

Published by Washington, DC: 1863 (1863)

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Item Description: Washington, DC: 1863, 1863. Partly engraved military appointment on vellum with the sections accomplished in manuscript (445 × 330 mm). Mounted, framed and glazed with UV conservation glass in dark wood frame with gilt slip. Originally folded into sixths leaving light creases as usual - it was common to carry such documents as instruments of authority, or means of identification - with two very small losses at the confluence of the upper centre folds, some light soiling verso, Stanton's signature is faded to brown, Lincoln's still quite strong. Blue wafer seal at left, with one small chip, and War Department docketing notations at upper left. Attractive cartouche of the American eagle at the head, and large trophy of arms at the foot, engraved by by J. V. N. and O. H. Throop. The document appoints Carl Proegler as an Assistant Surgeon of Volunteers, effective from October 4, 1862, signed in full Lincoln and Stanton. This appointment was made four months before the Battle of Gettysburg. Dr. Proegler (1837-1907), was born in Cologne and educated Erlangen, Würzburg, and Berlin, graduating from the last in 1859, and studying in Paris and London the following year, before emigrating to the United States. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he broke off from the practice that he had established in New York and "offered his services to the Government and was appointed Junior Surgeon of a hospital in Washington, where he remained for a few months. He afterward served as surgeon of various regiments, including the Twenty-fifth New York Infantry, of which he had charge in his professional capacity for about ten months. At the close of the war Dr. Proegler entered the navy and was made Fleet Surgeon under General Farragut — a position which he filled until 1868" (Memorial Record of Northeastern Indian, p.225). Proegler returned to Germany during the Franco-Prussian War, but in 1872 came back to America and settled in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where "from the beginning he maintained a place among the most able practitioners of this section of the State", a member of the Allen County Medical Society, he was twice Secretary to the State Board of Health. Highly appealing military-medical Lincoln document from the Civil War. Bookseller Inventory # 90344

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN. GETTYSBURG ADDRESS

Published by New York (1863)

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Item Description: New York, 1863. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. The World (illustrator). Newspaper, The World, New York, November 20, 1863. 8 pp., 15 3/8 x 23 in. ".It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on.A rare first day of publication newspaper, with Lincoln's timeless embodiment of American ideals prominently placed.This printing from November 20, the day after the Address, contains Lincoln's speech on the front page. This original issue also includes Edward Everett's speech, a report on the ceremonies, and a map of the "Great National Soldiers' Cemetery at Gettysburg." Partial Transcript"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth upon this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. (Applause.) Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But in a larger sense we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our power to add or detract. (Applause.) The world will little note nor long remember, what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. (Applause.) It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the refinished work that they have thus so far nobly carried on. (Applause.) It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion: that we here highly resolve that the dead shall not have died in vain (applause): that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom, and that governments of the people, by the people, and for the people, shall not perish from the earth. (Long continuous applause.)"The text is the Associated Press version, delivered by telegraph from the battlefield ceremonies. There are some slight variations between different newspapers and typesetters in terms of punctuation and capitalization, but the original AP version is easily identifiable by the use of the phrase "to the refinished work ." instead of the more appropriate "to the unfinished work."Additional differences between this and other versions of the text include:"We are met to dedicate" is "We have come to dedicate" in Lincoln's written copies.the word "poor," heard by some reporters and present in both of Lincoln's drafts, is excluded here: " far above our [poor] power to add or detract" "carried on" is found here and in Lincoln's second draft, but he replaced it with "advanced" in subsequent drafts: "have thus so far [so] nobly [carried on advanced]" For Full Historical Background of the Gettysburg Address click here. Newspaper. Bookseller Inventory # 22381

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Lincoln, Abraham

Published by Washington, D.C., (1864)

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Item Description: Washington, D.C., 1864. 30 January 1864, seven lines plus signature and date on verso of a manuscript petition from James S. Henderson and 13 others, to His Excellency A. Lincoln, Calloway County, Missouri, 18 January 1864. 2 pages, 4to. The letter respectfully petitions President Lincoln on behalf of three young Confederates " now prisoners of war at Point Lookout." They were captured at the Battle of Black Water (near Vicksburg) after entering "the Rebel Army.in the fall of 1861." Now, they are "desirous to return to their homes.and comply with the Laws." They are "willing to take the necessary Oath." Lincoln as was so often his wont, is happy to comply, and writes: "Let these three young men take the oarth of Dec. * and be discharged. Also let J.J. Neal go to Point Lookout & return with these young men. A. Lincoln." The three here pardoned were among the 1700 Confederate prisoners taken in the Battle of Big Black River, 17 May 1863, in the late phases of General Grant;s Vicksburg campaign. Bookseller Inventory # 884614

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LINCOLN, Abraham (1809 - 1965)

Published by Sangamon County, Illinois (1842)

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Item Description: Sangamon County, Illinois, 1842. unbound. 2 pages (front and back), 12.25 x 7.25 inches, Sangamon County, Illinois, March 1, 1842. Signed "Logan & Lincoln PQ," the name of Lincoln's law firm -- a writ on behalf of Illinois lumber merchants William Porter, James Donnell, and Joseph P. Eagen, who were seeking restitution and damages from a debtor, Frederick A. Patterson, in part: ".For that whereas the said defendant.was indebted to the said plaintiffs in the sum of one hundred and twenty three dollars, and eighty five, for scanting, joists, sheeting, rafters, weatherboarding, flooring and other lumber.yet the said defendant although often requested to do so has not as yet paid the said sum of money." Tears along the folds, silked on the back, slight staining, signature slightly smudged. Very good(-) condition. Bookseller Inventory # 234068

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LINCOLN, Abraham, JOHNSON, Andrew, BOLTON, Capt. John T, OLDROYD, Osborn H.]

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Item Description: Six related items, all finely mounted, comprising; 1.Regimental Document, 1pp., 15 x 10 inches printed on heavy paper, handwritten in spaces, concerning the appointment of John T. Bolton to First Sargeant in the New Jersey Volunteers, 15th September 1862. Some creasing and folds, light soiling, very good. 2. [LINCOLN, Abraham] Document, 1pp., approx 19 x 16 printed on vellum, Presidential title, elaborately engraved with eagle above text and military apparatus below. Concerns the appointment of Bolton to Second Lieutenant in the Veteran Reserve Corps. Dated 1st August, 1864. Signed by President Lincoln and the Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton. Printed text, handwritten name and date. With blue wax seal, and marginal notes in red ink from Adjutant General's office, some light soiling, folding, creases, very good. 3. [JOHNSON, Andrew] Document, 1pp., approx 19 x 16 inches printed on vellum, Presidential title as above. Concerns the appointment of John T Bolton to First Lieutenant for gallant and meritous services during the war. Dated 10th May 1866. Signed by President Johnson (a stamped signature, as was his method due to a weakened hand) and Stanton as Secretary of War. Printed text, handwritten name and date. With blue wax seal, and marginal notes in red ink, some light soiling, area of browning to top left, folding creases with one small hole, very good. 4. [JOHNSON, Andrew] Document 1pp., as above in format, for the appointment of Bolton to Captain. Dated 11th July 1866. Stamped signature of President Johnson and Stanton as Secretary of War. 5. OLDROYD, Osborn H. Assassination of Abraham Lincoln. 1901. 8vo. pp. 305, with advert and folding map. Some creasing to first few leaves else very good in brown cloth, titled in gilt. First Edition. 6. OLDROYD, Osborn H. Typed letter. 1pp., dated 1914, addressed to Bolton, requesting first hand accounts of the assassination (Bolton was on duty at Ford's Theatre that evening). Signed by the author. The material is archivally mounted and collected in an elegant half-leather clamshell box in elephant folio size. A striking presentation. John T. Bolton was a respected soldier and this is a good documentation of his progression through the ranks. Bolton was present when Abraham Lincoln was assassinated and it is understood from the family that he had applied for a position in the president's personal security team and that this was being considered at the time of the assassination. Bookseller Inventory # 36857

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Abraham Lincoln

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From: Virginia Book Shop, Inc., FABA (Ft. Lauderdale, FL, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: 1863. Book Condition: Very Good. Signed vellum field promotion of Joseph A. Slipper to to Assistant Adjutant General with the rank of Captain. (Slipper survived the war and was a journalist and bookprinter in New York City.) Framed and matted with plaque and 19th century portrait of Lincoln; also signed by by Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War ; Autograph; 36.5 in x 30 in; Signed by Author. Bookseller Inventory # 985

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Published by New York, NY (1860)

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Item Description: New York, NY, 1860. No binding. Book Condition: Fine. New York Semi-Weekly Tribune (illustrator). Newspaper. New York Semi-Weekly Tribune, New York, N.Y., February 28, 1860, 8 pp., disbound. The complete text of Lincoln's speech is printed under the headline: "NATIONAL POLITICS, A Speech, Delivered at the Cooper Institute Last Evening, by, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, of Illinois." "Let us have faith that right makes might." Brief Excerpt"Let all who believe that 'our fathers, who framed the Government under which we live, understood this question just as well, and even better, than we do now,' speak as they spoke, and act as they acted upon it. This is all Republicans ask -- all Republicans desire -- in relation to slavery. As those fathers marked it, so let it be again marked, as an evil not to be extended, but to be tolerated and protected only because of and so far as is actual presence among us makes that toleration and protection a necessity. Let all the guaranties those fathers gave it, be, not grudgingly, but fully and fairly maintained.Neither let us be slandered from our duty by false accusations against us, nor frightened from it by menaces of destruction to the Government nor of dungeons to ourselves. Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it." Historical BackgroundLincoln gave his speech at the Cooper Institute in New York City before he captured the Republican presidential nomination, and its success catapulted him to national attention as a viable presidential candidate. Using James Elliot's The Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution, he delivered a speech that concentrated on the Founders' original intent about the contentious issue of slavery. As in his "House Divided Speech" two years earlier, Lincoln used the occasion to differentiate his positions from those of the Democrats, who accused Republicans of being a sectional party, or of helping John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, or threatened secession if Lincoln was elected. Lincoln begins by arguing that twenty-one of the thirty-nine Constitution signers believed that the federal government could ban slavery in the territories. He then explained the Republican position did not threaten slavery where it already existed, though he did insist on limiting slavery's expansion into the territories.Unlike most of Lincoln's important speeches, the Cooper Union address is neither short nor particularly quotable. Nevertheless, Lincoln the lawyer lays out his arguments, building to the unassailable conclusion that the Founding Fathers saw slavery as an institution that would wither and die with time and isolation.On the afternoon of the speech, Lincoln sat for a photographic portrait in Matthew Brady's New York studio. He later reputedly said, "Brady and the Cooper Institute made me President." Lincoln dined with supporters, and the then went to the New York Tribune offices to read and correct the typeset text of his speech. According to the young typesetter who worked with Lincoln that night, the manuscript was left on a table and then discarded.Later, on page 4, Tribune editor Horace Greeley comments in an editorial, "The Speech of Abraham Lincoln at the Cooper Institute last evening was one of the happiest and most convincing political arguments ever made in this City." Greeley was so pleased that he rushed this edition into print, but also commented that "We shall print an extra edition of the Semi Weekly Tribune containing the speech . We shall soon issue his speech of last night in pamphlet form." The extra was printed later in the day on February 28; the pamphlet was printed March 6. As a result this is the first printing of Lincoln's Cooper Institute Speech.ConditionTreated by a professional paper conservator. Newspaper. Bookseller Inventory # 22847

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Item Description: 2 1/2 pages (8 x 5 in). Six lines in Lincoln's hand, on the last page of a petition submitted to and signed by sixteen members of Maryland's House of Delegates, Annapolis, 10 December 1861; written on Legislature of Maryland House of Delegates letterhead with a few fold separations, light tape stain. Led by the Speaker of the state House, John Summerfield Berry, Maryland legislators urge President Lincoln to grant a military commission: "The undersigned members of the House of Delegates of Maryland respectfully recommend to you, the appointment of Robert H. Thompson Esqr of this state as a Lieut of Marines. Mr. Thompson is a loyal man of a loyal family, and we are sure that he has all the personal characteristics necessary in an efficient military or naval officer." The petition is also endorsed by the state's governor, Thomas Holliday Hicks, who writes in a marginal note: "I concur fully in all said by the Gentlemen whose are hereto subscribed." Lincoln added his own endorsement and sent the petition on to Gideon Welles in the Department of the Navy, writing: "If there is a vacancy not already committed to any other, let the gentleman within recommended be approved.". Bookseller Inventory # 23625

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Lincoln, Abraham:

Published by Washington. July 1, 1864. (1864)

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Item Description: Washington. July 1, 1864., 1864. Broadside, measuring 19 1/2 x 16 inches; mounted and framed to 24 3/4 x 20 3/4 inches. Old fold lines. Minor soiling and wear. Very good. Attractive engraved broadside, completed in manuscript and signed by President Abraham Lincoln and Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, appointing Arthur B. Carpenter to the rank of First Lieutenant in the Nineteenth Regiment of Infantry in the Union Army. Carpenter survived the Civil War and was promoted to Captain, serving with Philip Sheridan in the Indian wars on the Western frontier. With the embossed seal of the War Department and contemporary docketing near the top. Very nice and framed for display. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 43457

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Item Description: Washington, 1863. Autograph. Book Condition: Very Good. A small laid paper scrap to an unnamed recipient inclining to support Illinois Senator Lyman Trumbull's recommendation that Nathan M. Knapp be appointed [as Paymaster in the United States Army]. Certainly the same N.M Knapp from the Springfield/Winchester delegation to the 1860 Republican convention who had written to Lincoln during the 1860 convention: "Things are working: keep a good nerve - be not surprised at any result - but I tell you your chances are not the worst. We have got Seward in the attitude of the representative Republican of the East - you at West. We are laboring to make you the second choice of all the delegations we can, where we can't make you first choice. We are dealing tenderly with the delegates taking them in detail and making no fuss. Be not too expectant, but rely upon our discretion. Again I say brace your nerves for any result."(James A. Hamilton, Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton; or Men and Events at Home and Abroad, during Three Quarters of a Century (Letter to James A. Hamilton). , May 31, 1860, pp. 453-454, footnote 19). Even earlier, in March, Knapp wrote: "I want Abe to run; then I want a picture of him splitting rails on the Sangamon Bottom, with 50 cts per hundred marked on a chip placed in the fork of a tree nearby. I think it will win." (N. M. Knapp to Ozias M. Hatch, Winchester, Illinois, 12 March 1860, Hatch Papers, Lincoln Presidential Library, Springfield.); 32mo; Signed by Author. Bookseller Inventory # 1432

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN. THANKSGIVING

Published by Massachusetts (1862)

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Item Description: Massachusetts, 1862. No binding. Book Condition: Very Good. Broadside. Proclamation of Thanksgiving. Massachusetts, [probably Boston], ca. July 27-August 6, 1862. 1 p., 20 x 28 in. Lincoln's first call for a national day of Thanksgiving. This broadside is split into two parts: The upper portion prints Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew's announcement of Lincoln's Proclamation dated July 27, 1863, while the lower portion prints Lincoln's actual proclamation, dated July 15, 1863, designating August 6 as a "day for National Thanksgiving, Praise, and Prayer."This proclamation was issued after the great Union victory at Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863. On July 15, 1863, Lincoln proclaimed "a day for National Thanksgiving, Praise, and Prayer" set for Thursday, August 6, 1863. This was the first time he ordered a day of thanksgiving at the national level. Three months later, on October 3, 1863, Lincoln issued the proclamation that made Thanksgiving a national holiday. Overall, he issued nine proclamations calling for days of prayer, fasting, or thanksgiving during his presidency.Complete TextProclamation of ThanksgivingJuly 15, 1863By the President of the United States of America.A Proclamation.It has pleased Almighty God to hearken to the supplications and prayers of an afflicted people, and to vouchsafe to the army and the navy of the United States victories on land and on the sea so signal and so effective as to furnish reasonable grounds for augmented confidence that the Union of these States will be maintained, their constitution preserved, and their peace and prosperity permanently restored. But these victories have been accorded not without sacrifices of life, limb, health and liberty incurred by brave, loyal and patriotic citizens. Domestic affliction in every part of the country follows in the train of these fearful bereavements. It is meet and right to recognize and confess the presence of the Almighty Father and the power of His Hand equally in these triumphs and in these sorrows:Now, therefore, be it known that I do set apart Thursday the 6th. day of August next, to be observed as a day for National Thanksgiving, Praise and Prayer, and I invite the People of the United States to assemble on that occasion in their customary places of worship, and in the forms approved by their own consciences, render the homage due to the Divine Majesty, for the wonderful things he has done in the Nation's behalf, and invoke the influence of His Holy Spirit to subdue the anger, which has produced, and so long sustained a needless and cruel rebellion, to change the hearts of the insurgents, to guide the counsels of the Government with wisdom adequate to so great a national emergency, and to visit with tender care and consolation throughout the length and breadth of our land all those who, through the vicissitudes of marches, voyages, battles and sieges, have been brought to suffer in mind, body or estate, and finally to lead the whole nation, through the paths of repentance and submission to the Divine Will, back to the perfect enjoyment of Union and fraternal peace.In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.Done at the city of Washington, this fifteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-eighth.By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLNWILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.ConditionProfessionally mended along several folds and flattened; minor toning and offsetting. Broadside. Bookseller Inventory # 23584

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