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DARWIN, Charles Robert.

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Item Description: Hard cover. [Drop-title]: For Private Distribution Extracts from Letters addressed to Professor Henslow by C. Darwin. 31 pp. 8vo, bound in attractive green morocco-backed cloth over boards. [Cambridge: "Printed for Distribution among the Members of the Cambridge Philosophical Society," 1 December 1835]. First edition of Darwin’s first separately printed work, and of the greatest rarity. This unauthorized pamphlet contains extracts from ten letters written to John Stevens Henslow (1796-1861), by Darwin during his five-year voyage on the Beagle. Henslow had been Darwin’s botany professor at Cambridge and their friendship "was one of the most influential circumstances in his [Darwin’s] early life."–ODNB. It was Henslow who obtained for him the post of naturalist on the Beagle. Darwin’s letters were published without his knowledge; Henslow had read some of them before the Cambridge Philosophical Society and was responsible for printing this small pamphlet of extracts. The present work did introduce Darwin’s name and some important observations to a small but influential group of scientists, and when he arrived back in England in the autumn of 1836 he carried with him something of a reputation as a geologist. Fine copy, preserved in a green morocco-backed box. From the library of Robert Crewe-Milnes, 1st Marquess of Crewe (1858-1945), British statesman and author (note on pastedown stating that the book was purchased by Maggs Bros. from the Crewe library). Accompanied by the 1960 privately printed facsimile. ? Freeman 1. Bookseller Inventory # JHABES3678

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DARWIN, Charles.

Published by John Murray, London (1859)

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From: SOPHIA RARE BOOKS (Koebenhavn V, Denmark)

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Item Description: John Murray, London, 1859. First edition, untouched in its original binding, inscribed by Darwin’s closest collaborator Joseph Hooker just eleven days after its publication. A magnificent association copy, of "the most influential scientific work of the nineteenth century" (Horblit) and "the most important biological work ever written" (Freeman). ?Dibner 199; PMM 344b; Evans 110; Grolier/Horblit 23b; Grolier/Medicine 70b; Sparrow 49; Norman 593. "Darwin not only drew an entirely new picture of the workings of organic nature; he revolutionized our methods of thinking and our outlook on the natural order of things. The recognition that constant change is the order of the universe had been finally established and a vast step forward in the uniformity of nature had been taken" (PMM). Presented by Darwin’s closest friend and intellectual confidant, it is hard to imagine an association that would bring us closer to Darwin’s inner circle. Provenance: Joseph Dalton Hooker, autograph inscription on half-title, dated 5th December 1859, to his uncle by marriage John Gunn (1801-90), vicar of Barton Turf, Norfolk, and founder member of the Norwich Geological Society: ‘The Revd. J. Gunn from his affect. nephew JDH. Kew Dec. 5/59’. Gunn’s obituary in the Geological Magazine (July 1890) noted that with his death there came to an end "one of the last links between the geologists of the present and those who laid the foundation of the science". He was married to Hooker’s maternal aunt. Darwin had assimilated the researches and observations from his five years as naturalist aboard the survey ship H.M.S. Beagle into the essential formulation of his theory of natural selection more than two decades before On the Origin of Species appeared, but he may not have published his revolutionary theory during his lifetime had not Alfred R. Wallace independently come to a nearly identical conclusion about the transmutation of species. After the Linnean Society read and published jointly Darwin and Wallace’s preliminary expositions of the theory of evolution, Darwin rushed to prepare for publication an epitome of the ‘big species book’ that he had been working on since 1856. Originally conceived as a work that might be printed on four or five sheets of paper, Origin evolved during the eight months of its writing into a volume of nearly 500 pages. The final scope of Origin prompted Darwin to abandon plans for his ‘big book,’ although he salvaged much of the first part of the manuscript for The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, published in 1868. On the Origin of Species caused an immediate sensation. Joseph Hooker (1817-1911) graduated from the University of Glasgow with an M.D. in 1839. Through his familiarity with his father Sir William Jackson Hooker’s herbarium, he was well prepared for the first of his many travels—as surgeon-botanist aboard HMS Erebus on the Antarctic expedition of 1839–43. Shortly after returning to England, and already an admirer of the older man, "he was approached about working on Darwin's collection of plants from the Beagle voyage. Just the previous year Darwin had written out his first coherent account of the main elements of his species theory, and within a few months Hooker was admitted into the small and select group of those with whom Darwin felt able to discuss his emerging ideas. In perhaps his most famous letter of all, Darwin wrote to Hooker in January 1844 of his growing conviction that species "are not . immutable" – an admission he likened, half jokingly, to "confessing a murder". When Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) sent Darwin a letter in 1858 outlining an almost identical theory to his own, it was Hooker, together with Charles Lyell, who engineered the simultaneous publication of papers by both men, and secured Darwin’s claim to the theory of ‘modification through descent’ by means of the mechanism Darwin called ‘natural selection’. "It was also to Hooker that Darwin, writing furiously in the succeeding months, sent batch. Bookseller Inventory # 3654

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DARWIN, Charles

Published by London, John Murray, 1859 (1859)

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Item Description: London, John Murray, 1859, 1859. 8vo in 12s, (200 x 124 mm), pp ix 502; 32 (publisher's advertisements, dated June 1859), with a folding diagram facing p 117; a very clean, bright copy, tight in its binding, original publisher's cloth, in a morocco-backed box. £150,000First edition of the single most important biological book ever published. 'The publication of the Origin of species ushered in a new era in our thinking about the nature of man. The intellectual revolution it caused and the impact it had on man's concept of himself and the world were greater than those caused by the works of Copernicus, Newton, and the great physicists of more recent times ? Every modern discussion of man's future, the population explosion, the struggle for existence, the purpose of man and the universe, and man's place in nature rests on Darwin' (Ernst Mayr).This copy has an interesting and early provenance. It belonged to a Henry Orme Wood, a student at St. Johns, Cambridge, who received his MA in 1840. Little is known about him apart from his being a subscriber to George Robert Gray's Genera of birds (1838-49). He was clearly a close reader of the Origin, with passages relating to the variation of species marked throughout the text. He was presumably also responsible for the two contemporary newspaper clippings neatly tipped onto the endleaves, front and back. The one on the front is an account of a lecture given by Professor Owen on '27th ultimo' (with Wood's ms note that this was January 1860) at the Royal Institution 'On the Cerebral Classification of the Mammalia'. 'Whilst speaking of the cetacea, Professor Owen referred to the recently enunciated theory of the origin of species and expressed his disbelief in the possibility of producing a warm-blooded animal so peculiarly constituted as the whale by any process of "natural selection"'. The second insert is 'Objections to Mr. Darwin's Theory of the Origin of Species', an extensive critique several columns in length, published in The Spectator on April 7, 1860 (it had originally appeared on March 24 but was hastily reprinted in April in order to correct two mistakes). Although the article was anonymous the author was the distinguished geologist and Darwin's geological tutor Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873). He was one of the recipients of a presentation copy of the first edition of the Origin, which he received 'with more pain than pleasure'. Sedgwick ends this review with the words 'I cannot conclude without expressing my detestation of the theory, because of its unflinching materialism.' Upon reading Sedgwick's review, Darwin wrote immediately to Charles Lyell (Darwin Correspondence Project letter 2734): 'I now feel certain that Sedgwick is author of article in Spectator. No one else would use such abusive terms. And what misrepresentation of my notions! Any ignoramus would suppose that I had first broached the doctrine that the breaks between successive formations marked long intervals of time. It is very unfair.- But poor dear old Sedgwick seems rabid on question.- Demoralised understanding!! If ever I talk with him, I will tell him that I never could believe that an inquisitor could be a good man, but now I know that a man may roast another & yet have as kind & noble a heart as Sedgwick's'.On April 3 Darwin wrote to Asa Gray as follows:Sedgwick (as I & Lyell feel certain from internal evidence) has reviewed me savagely & unfairly in the Spectator. The notice includes much abuse & is hardly fair in several respects. He would actually lead anyone, who was ignorant of geology, to suppose that I had invented the great gaps between successive geological formations; instead of its being an almost universally admitted dogma. But my dear old friend Sedgwick with his noble heart is old & is rabid with indignation.' (letter 2743). Despite Sedgwick's rejection of the theory of natural selection he and Darwin remained good friends throughout.The inclusion of these early references and reviews indicate that Wood had his copy in hand whe. Bookseller Inventory # 3897

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DARWIN, Charles.

Published by London: John Murray, 1859 (1859)

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Item Description: London: John Murray, 1859, 1859. Octavo. Original green diagonal-wave-grain cloth, covers blocked in blind, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, brown coated endpapers, Edmonds & Remnants binder's ticket to rear pastedown. Housed in a green morocco-backed folding case (spine sunned). Ink ownership inscription of G. W. H. Taylor, Helsington Parsonage, Kendal, Westmorland dated June 1860 on front free endpaper. Extremities lightly rubbed, head and foot of spine and corners a bit bumped, front joint worn through in two small areas, front hinge with superficial cracks, overall an excellent copy in the original cloth. Folding diagram. Binding variant a (no priority); without the inserted advertisements usually but not always found, clearly as issued. First edition of "the most influential scientific work of the 19th century" (Horblit) and "the most important biological book ever written" (Freeman); one of 1,250 copies. Dibner 199; Freeman 373; Garrison–Morton 220; Horblit 23b; Norman 593; Printing and the Mind of Man 344b. Bookseller Inventory # 94265

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Item Description: London, Henry Colburn, 1839, 1839. 3 vols in four (vol 2 having a separate Appendix), 8vo (235 x 145 mm), pp xxviii [iv] 1-559, 556-597 [recte 601]; xiv [ii] 694 [2]; viii 352; xiv 629 [609]-615, with 8 engraved folding maps and charts (loosely inserted in pockets at the front of each volume, as issued, the ribbon for extracting the charts still present in each pocket), 48 plates and charts, and 6 text illustrations; some slight foxing to plates, a few of the charts split at folds, overall a very good copy in original cloth, spines somewhat faded, minor repairs to spines but intact in its original binding, in morocco-backed boxes. £110,000First edition, an extraordinary presentation copy inscribed by the Commander of the Beagle Robert Fitzroy (see below), the man who chose Darwin to accompany him on the epochal voyage. This work is the complete narrative of 'one of the most famous scientific expeditions in history' (DSB). The third volume comprises Darwin's own journal of his voyage in the Beagle, which is the first issue of his first published book. 'The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career' (Charles Darwin, Life and Letters I p 61).Darwin's Journal of researches, as it became known, was his first formal publication and a classic of natural history travel narrative. It was the most important scientific voyage ever undertaken, for it gave impetus and direction to all of Darwin's later researches. 'The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change. He also developed doubts of the value of the Scriptures as a trustworthy guide to the history of the earth and of man, with the result that he gradually became an agnostic. The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought' (Gavin de Beer in DSB).Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition, 1826-30, under Philip Parker King in the Adventure, during which Fitzroy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes Fitzroy's continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone, ending in 1836. 'The surveys he carried out in South American waters established Fitzroy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area' (DSB).Provenance: inscribed and signed on the half-title by the Captain of the Beagle, Robert Fitzroy, to 'Dr. Lee, LL.D., a tribute of esteem and respect from Robt. Fitzroy, Sept. 19th, 1856.' Also inscribed by Lee on the front pastedown, 'John Lee, Hartwell, a present from the accomplished author, 22 September 1856', with Lee's armorial bookplate on front pastedown in all volsAn extraordinary presentation copy connecting two exceptional Victorians. Besides their other formidable accomplishments, they were both pioneer meteorologists,xand this was probably the reason for the gift of these volumes.Robert Fitzroy (1805-1865) commander of the Beagle on its second voyage, chose Charles Darwin to accompany him on what became the most famous scientific expedition ever undertaken. Following completion of the voyage in 1835, Fitzroy prepared these volumes for publication. In 1843 he was appointed to the gouvernorship of New Zealand, returning to England in 1845; in 1857 he became Rear Admiral and in 1863 Vice Admiral.'In the years of his retirement, Fitzroy turned his attention to the emerging science of meteorology and devoted all of his energies to the advancem. Bookseller Inventory # 3874

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DARWIN, CHARLES

Published by Down, Kent (1871)

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Item Description: Down, Kent, 1871. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. An intimate photographic memento of Charles Darwin and his family. This extremely rare Darwin family photograph album contains photographs of Charles Darwin (1809-1882) and his wife Emma Darwin (1808-1896); their son George Howard Darwin (1845-1912), with another showing George holding his nephew Bernard Darwin; their daughter Elizabeth Darwin (1847-1926) and another of Elizabeth; their son Horace Darwin (1850-1953); their daughter Henrietta Emma ‘Etty’ Litchfield (1843-1927), with another two of Henrietta; Henrietta’s husband Richard Buckley Litchfield (1832-1903), with another of Richard; Charles and Emma’s first grandson Bernard Darwin (1876-1961) with two other photographs of the infant; and other photographs of as-yet unidentified sitters. The portrait of Charles Darwin was made by Oscar Rejlander, “Darwin’s Photographer.” When Darwin decided to use photographs to illustrate his planned book on The Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals, he had found it difficult to obtain images with the desired facial expressions. After extensive searching, he eventually turned to the Swedish photographer Oscar Rejlander, whom he met in 1871. This seated portrait was one of several Rejlander made in 1871 or 1872. Darwin declared these “The best photographs of me” (Darwin Correspondence Project). Rejlander became “Darwin’s principal adviser on photographic issues [and] presented Darwin with at least sixty-four pictures of expression, more than any other photographer” (Prodger, Darwin’s Camera). Three of the portraits in this album are by Rejlander. Henrietta Darwin lived and worked with her father at Down House until her marriage at age twenty-eight to Richard Buckley Litchfield on 31 August 1871. This album contains portraits of Henrietta and Richard signed and dated on their wedding day, an indication of the sentimental importance of this album. “She was a valued editor to her father as well as companion and correspondent to both of her parents. Henrietta played a significant role in the continuing memorialization of both of her parents: she edited passages of The Autobiography of Charles Darwin (1887). Although Henrietta was not afforded the formal schooling provided to her brothers, her keen editorial eye was sought after by her father for his scientific writing, particularly his 1871 work, The Descent of Man. In this Henrietta provided far more than grammatical assistance; Darwin asked her to help clarify and enliven his work.” “Though far less recognized by Victorian society for her intellectual worth than her father or brothers, Henrietta was an essential lynchpin in the Darwin circle, and helped anchor both the scientific and domestic activities of her family” (Darwin Correspondence Project). Charles Darwin thanked Henrietta for her role in preparing the second printing of The Descent of Man (1871), writing in part, “Several reviewers speak of the lucid vigorous style etc.— Now I know how much I owe to you in this respect, which includes arrangement, not to mention still more important aids in the reasoning” (20 March 1871). After her father’s death, she assisted with the editing of his Autobiography and Life of Erasmus Darwin, and she edited her mother Emma’s Letters. Henrietta’s husband, R.B. Litchfield, took a junior position in the Ecclesiastical Commission to provide an income to support him in his work at the philanthropic Working Men’s College. There he taught mathematics and singing, eventually becoming its principal. Litchfield was a friend of James Clerk Maxwell and John Ruskin. Two of the photographs are of Charles Darwin’s second son George Howard Darwin (1845-1912). A distinguished astronomer, George Darwin was Plumian Professor of Astronomy at Cambridge, President of the Royal Astronomical Society, Fellow of the Royal Society, and recipient of its Royal Medal and Copley Medal. George Howard Darwin has signed his portrait on the verso. The collection also includes rare photographs of two other children of Charle. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-15952773024

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DARWIN, Charles

Published by John Murray, London (1859)

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From: B & L Rootenberg Rare Books, ABAA (Sherman Oaks, CA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: John Murray, London, 1859. FIRST EDITION. 8vo. ix, [i], 502 pp. With 1 folding plate. Half-morocco over marbled boards of the period. An excellent copy inscribed by Leonard Darwin, Charles Darwin's son, with related material bound in at the end, including a 2-page letter signed by Darwin, and an unrecorded offprint of a paper on Darwin's work. Preserved in a half-morocco solander box (see provenance). First edition, first issue, of Darwin’s historic and pioneering work on the theory of evolution; certainly the most important biological book ever written. Bound in: 1. Half-title inscribed by Leonard Darwin: This is the first edition of the Origin -- written by my father -- containing a passage on p. 184 which he always regretted to have omitted in later editions -- 10 April 1927. Refers to the black bear and the possibility of their development by natural selection into aquatic animals, reprinted in the first four American editions (Osborn, Book Collector, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 77-78 (1960); Freeman, p. 76).2. ALS. Charles Darwin to Lady Drysdale. [ca. 1859]. 2 pp. (possibly lacking 1 page). The letter is addressed to the mother-in-law of Dr. Lane, whose Moor Park spas Darwin and his wife frequented after 1857. The letter was probably written while Darwin was at a hydropathic spa in Ilkley, Yorkshire from October to December, 1859. At that time Lane was moving to Sudbrooke Park, Surrey, which Darwin and his wife visited the following year.3. ALS. George Augustus Rowell to Sir James Emerson Tennent (of Tempo Manor). 3 Alfred Street, Oxford, December 12, 1860. 3 pages.4. ROWELL, George Augustus. "Mr. Darwin’s Theory." Reprinted from the Oxford Chronicle of Dec. 8, 1860. 8 pp.First edition of this unrecorded offprint on Darwin’s theory of how instincts are neither endowed nor learned, but a result of "accidental natural selection." Rowell states that Darwin fails to sufficiently support his case, and "actually his examples of the cuckoo and the bee sting demonstrate the wisdom of the Creator." Interestingly enough, the author unwittingly offers further evidence in support of Darwin’s theory.Provenance: This copy of the Origin was presented to Sir James Emerson Tennent (1804-1869), best known for his works on the natural history of Ceylon, by George Augustus Rowell (1804-1892), underkeeper of the Ashmolean and of the Oxford University Museum. The Rowell letter notes that he became despondent about his scientific work and burned all his manuscripts, papers and apparatus. He eventually changed his mind, and in 1862 published a second edition of his pamphlet on pain. A slip bound in at the end by Sir Charles Langham, Baronet of Tempo Manor notes that Leonard Darwin had signed the book while visiting him, and that in 1946, the book was appraised at £ 20. Dibner, Heralds of Science, 199; Freeman, 373; Printing & the Mind of Man, 344b. Bookseller Inventory # 13831

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Darwin, Charles; King, Parker P. Captain; Fitz-Roy, Robert, Captain

Published by Henry Colburn, Great Marlborough Street, London (1839)

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Item Description: Henry Colburn, Great Marlborough Street, London, 1839. Hardcover. Book Condition: Very Good+. First Edition. Boards with light rubbing to extremities but in lovely shape for its age ; 3 volume set and appendix in separate book. Vol. I: Proceedings of the first expedition, 1826 - 1830, under the command of Captain P. Parker King. Vol. II: Proceedings of the second expedition, 1831 - 1836, under the command of Captain Robert Fitz-Roy, Vol. III: Journal and Remarks. 1832 - 1836, by Charles Darwin, Appendix to the second volume in separate book. - Original dark green boards with blindstamped decoration. Maps in front pockets of each volume. This is the official account of the most famous nineteenth century naval exploring expedition, of which Darwin's contribution amounts to the entire third volume of the work. This third volume is here in its very first issue and includes all Darwin's observations made during the expedition. Darwin's volume is twenty years before he published one of the most influential books ever written, "Origin of Species"; 8vo; xxiii, 597; xiv, 694; xiv, 615; 352, 16 pages. Bookseller Inventory # 12568

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Item Description: London, Henry Colburn, 1839, 1839. 3 vols in four (vol 2 having a separate Appendix), 8vo (235 x 145 mm), pp xxviii [iv] 1-559, 556-597 [recte 601]; xiv [ii] 694 [2]; viii 352; xiv 629 [609]-615, with 8 engraved folding maps and charts (loosely inserted in pockets at the front of each volume, as issued, the ribbon for extracting the charts still present in each pocket), 48 plates and charts, and 6 text illustrations; very faint marginal waterstain on lower margin of a few of the plates, otherwise a remarkably fresh and clean copy, without the foxing that often occurs, in original publisher's cloth, spines slightly sun-faded as often, minor repairs to binding. £60,000First edition, a very attractive set, of the complete narrative of 'one of the most famous scientific expeditions in history' (DSB). The third volume comprises Darwin's own journal of his voyage in the Beagle, which is the first issue of his first published book.Darwin's Journal of researches as it became known was his first formal publication and a classic of natural history travel narrative. It was perhaps the most important scientific voyage ever undertaken, for it gave impetus and direction to all of Darwin's later research. 'The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change. He also developed doubts of the value of the Scriptures as a trustworthy guide to the history of the earth and of man, with the result that he gradually became an agnostic. The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought' (Gavin de Beer in DSB).Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition, 1826-30, under Philip Parker King in the Adventure, during which FitzRoy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes FitzRoy's continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone, ending in 1836. 'The surveys he carried out in South American waters established FitzRoy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area' (DSB).Freeman 10; Freeman Companion p 213; Norman 584. Bookseller Inventory # 3849

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BEAGLE] KING, Phillip Parker, Robert FITZROY and Charles DARWIN

Published by Henry Colburn, London (1839)

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From: Hordern House Rare Books (Potts Point, NSW, Australia)

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Item Description: Henry Colburn, London, 1839. Four volumes, octavo, with four charts bound in and eight loose folding maps (two accompanying each volume in original endpaper sleeve), and a total of 44 engraved plates after Augustus Earle and Conrad Martens; from the library of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, with blind stamps; a couple of pages in the second volume carelessly opened, slight foxing of some plates; a most attractive set in the original uniform publisher's cloth. The Beagle voyage: first issue of the first edition. First edition, comprising first issues in the original cloth bindings, of the full narrative of one of the greatest marine and scientific surveys of all time. The first published account of the voyages of the Beagle, this famous publication includes the full account written by Charles Darwin, the first major work published by him. As the greatest voyage of the intellect, as the voyage has been described, the Beagle voyage of 1831-36 perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the historical period of Enlightenment voyages as well as being one of its highest achievements, a voyage of discovery that would change scientific thinking and ultimately the understanding of man's place in the universe.The voyage is renowned above all else because of Fitzroy's choice of Charles Darwin as naturalist, but the narrative also includes a large section written by Phillip Parker King describing his experience aboard the Beagle, work which confirmed his status as the pre-eminent Australian cartographer.'Fitzroy, who was more concerned with science than were many naval officers of his day, made it possible for Darwin to visit tropical lands and study their flora, fauna, and geology. The two men shared the same cabin and Fitzroy was attentive to the scientific needs and interests of the young Darwin. Fitzroy's violent temper and his conservative opinions on religion and slavery were responsible for some disagreements between them, but Fitzroy and Darwin remained on friendly terms' (DSB). Many years later Darwin reflected in his autobiography that Fitzroy's character 'was in several respects one of the most noble which I have ever known' and expressed his immense debt to his time in the Beagle: 'The voyage of the Beagle has been by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career?'.Publication of Darwin's journal had been urged by Fitzroy during the voyage. It was finally included as the third volume of the official Narrative, which was under the overall editorship of Fitzroy, and it was in this form that Darwin's first book was published. Immediately popular, it was reprinted several times with different titles, but is widely known today as The Voyage of the Beagle. Freeman notes 'His first published book is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only On the Origin of Species as the most often printed'. It was also one of Darwin's personal favourites, as he writes in his autobiography: 'The success of this my first literary child tickles my vanity more than that of any of my other books'.Volume I of the Narrative concerns the initial surveying expedition of the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, 1826-30, under Phillip Parker King in the Adventure, during which Fitzroy succeeded Pringle Stokes as commander of the accompanying Beagle. Volume II describes Fitzroy's continuation and completion of the survey with the Beagle alone in South America, Australia, New Zealand, Tahiti, and many other groups in the course of the circumnavigation. 'The surveys he carried out in South American waters established Fitzroy as a first-rate hydrographer and won for him the gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society (1837). Because his marine surveys were accurate to such a high degree they are still used as the foundation for a number of charts of that area' (DSB). Volume II includes a separately bound appendix of bearings and observations by Fitzroy that is likewise accompanied by two folding maps.This set comprises first issues of all. Bookseller Inventory # 4304414

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DARWIN, CHARLES.

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Item Description: About 65 words, entirely in DarwinÕs hand; with ink corrections; the text is slightly different than that in the published text. This ms. leaf is tipped into a copy of The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Including an Autobiographical Chapter. Edited by His Son Francis Darwin. London: John Murray, 1887. First Edition; three volumes; bound in 3/4 leather and marbled paper boards by Bickers & Son, Leicester. Very minor wear and spotting. On the first blank, prior to the tipped-in leaf, it is inscribed ÒGood Wishes for the welfare of the Germantown Hospital. Francis Darwin, Feb 6, 1900.Ó Below it is inscribed by his brother, The annexed paper is from the M.S of Insectivorous Plants. Feb. 6 1900. G.H. Darwin.Ó Just below, George has endorsed it at Haverford [Pennsylvania] on April 16, 1906, also signing the verso of the leaf, which bears his calculations, Ò(mathematical work by G.H. Darwin Apr 16 1906).Ó George, a prominent astronomer and mathematician, married a Philadelphian. [With] a second edition of Insectivorous Plants. London: John Murray, 1888. This edition was revised by Francis, and printed drawings by Charles Darwin, as well as some by Francis and George. The hinges of this copy are cracked, but it is largely in very good condition. The Life and Letters is in a custom quarter-morocco clamshell box. Bookseller Inventory # 32776

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Item Description: Down, Beckenham, 24 November 1869, 1869. 4 pages, 8vo (203 x 128 mm), ink on paper, small loss of blank corner margin, creases from posting. £37,500A fine and substantial autograph letter to an unnamed person at Appleton & Co., Darwin's American publishers. Darwin is anxious for them to bring out a new American edition of the Origin, incorporating corrections and additions since the second edition of 1860, 'as it is 92 pages longer than the 2nd. edition, besides endless small though important corrections'. He states his belief that 'the continued large sale of this book in England Germany & France has depended on my keeping up each edition to the existing standard of science', and threatens that if Appleton is unable to comply he will ask Asa Gray to find another publisher. He also threatens that he will not give Appleton his 'new book' (i.e. The Descent of Man) unless they agree to a new edition of the Origin. In the event, Appleton published a new edition in 1870 as Darwin had demanded (note that their 1869 edition was just a reprint of their 1860 edition), and published the first American edition of The Descent of Man in 1871.Provenance: Sotheby's 21 May 1968 to Ralph Colp, JrDarwin Correspondence Project 7007 (partial transcription). Bookseller Inventory # 3574

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Item Description: London: Henry Colburn, 1839., 1839. Four volumes, including appendix volume. xxviii,[4],597,24; xiv,[2],694,[1]; xiv,615,16; viii,352pp, including half titles in three primary volumes; plus forty-six plates (including two frontispieces), one plan, and ten maps and charts (nine folding). Original green publisher's cloth, stamped in blind and gilt. Cloth on the first two volumes lightly sunned; spine lightly faded on the fourth volume. Corners lightly rubbed. Light scattered foxing and soiling, some slight offsetting. Several leaves loosening in the second volume. Overall, a very good to near fine set, in the original binding. First issue of the first, second, and fourth volumes, with the second issue of the third volume. The account of the Beagle's two voyages, edited by Robert Fitzroy, who served as commander of both voyages. The third volume of this work represents the first edition (second issue) of Darwin's account of the voyage, which provided the basis for his ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES, found here in its second issue entitled, JOURNAL OF RESEARCHES INTO THE GEOLOGY AND NATURAL HISTORY OF THE VARIOUS COUNTRIES VISITED BY H.M.S. BEAGLE. "The third volume contains Darwin's account of the voyage, now famous as the genesis of his theory of evolutionary biology. The demand for Darwin's JOURNAL immediately exceeded that for the companion volumes of the NARRATIVE. Colburn therefore brought out a separate edition of it in the same year" - Hill. Freeman notes that Darwin's "first published book is undoubtedly the most often read and stands second only to ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES as the most often printed. It is an important travel book in its own right and its relation to the background of his evolutionary ideas has often been stressed." The first volume contains Captain King's account of the first coastal surveys of Patagonia and Terra del Fuego, produced on the first expedition between 1826 and 1830. The other volumes comprise the account of the second voyage of the Beagle. Between 1831 and 1836 the ship visited Brazil, Argentina, Terra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, and Australia. The appendix to the second volume, bound here as the fourth volume of this set, includes a meteorological journal, official instructions, correspondence, and notes. Four of the six plates in the appendix volume consist of sixteen separate illustrations of various cloud formations. An attractive set of a landmark of scientific exploration, one of the most important Pacific voyages, and Darwin's first substantial book publication. HILL 607. FREEMAN 10, pp.31-39. BORBA DE MORAES, p.247. SABIN 37826. Bookseller Inventory # WRCAM 43209

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Charles Darwin

Published by John Murray, London (1860)

Used Hardcover First Edition Signed

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From: Festival Art and Books (Machynlleth, POWYS, United Kingdom)

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Item Description: John Murray, London, 1860. Decorative Cloth. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. 2nd Edition. Presentation copy to Frederick Moore on behalf of Charles Darwin.No foxing, no repairs, rubbing to spine head and corner. Bright title and cover clothe. Very nice condition. Rather than describe the condition in minute detail here, please ask for a full set of photos and catalogue. We are selling an entire first and early edition collection of Darwin and other Victorian naturalist. in many cases we have several copies of the same Darwin titles in similar condtion, including presentation copies. Please ask for a complete catalogue. Signed by Author. Bookseller Inventory # 01267

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DARWIN, Charles

Published by Downe, Bromley, Kent, February 9, 1868 (1868)

Used

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From: WP Watson Antiquarian Books (London, United Kingdom)

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Item Description: Downe, Bromley, Kent, February 9, 1868, 1868. 2 pages on a single sheet, 8vo (200 x 123 mm); creases from folding £28,500An important unpublished and hitherto unknown letter from Darwin to his 'best advocate', the Harvard botanist Asa Gray, discussing the publication of The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (1868). It also sheds a new light on the relationship of the Variation to the Origin and explicity confirms that the Variation was largely composed as part of Darwin's 'big species' book before the Origin. It comprised in fact the first two chapters of the manuscript.The present letter is addressed from Downe House on February 9 of 1868, only a few weeks after the January publication of The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication. Beginning in October 1867 Darwin had sent proof sheets of the first volume of the Variation to Gray. Gray arranged the American publication of the work, and also wrote a preface to the American edition. The Variation was originally part of Darwin's 'big book' on evolution, of which the Origin was a hastily written abstract. The Variation was the first work presenting some of the wealth of detailed evidence Darwin had collected in support of his theory.Darwin writes, 'My dear Gray, Last August you gave me Dr. Butterick's address simply "New York" & to day the letter despatched in September has been returned to me, as "not found". As I do not like that he should think me uncourteous & ungrateful, will you address & forward the enclosed, though it is in itself not worth sending. I despatched about 2 or 3 weeks ago the last sheets, titles &c of my Book [the Variation]. I have become fairly disgusted with it, but yesterday I heard the whole edition of 1500 copies was sold in a week! & a new edition is to be printed in a fortnight, so urgent is the demand. Unfortunate people, they clearly do not know what they are eager for. The book has been an inhuman labour to me & I have the greatest doubt whether it is worth a half or a quarter of the labour. Anyhow it will show to the public that I did not speak out without having worked out my subject - almost all the chapters were partially & some fully written before I published the Origin - If you can help me about expression [re The Expression of Emotions], pray give any [three illegible words] - My dear Gray yours most sincerely, C. Darwin. [P. S.] We have been so much pleased at our second son being second Wrangler at our Cambridge, which signifies proper mathematical knowledge & talent'.As Darwin makes clear in the letter, much of the material published in The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication had been gathered and written-up during his decades-long investigations into natural selection, and the book formed an important companion volume to The Origin of Species, as well as the jumping-off point for his later book, The Descent of Man. A wonderfully intimate letter, combining both the personal and professional, to an important friend and colleague, which provides a window onto Darwin's working process, publication history, and emotions regarding one of his most important books.Although we have letters from Asa Gray in reply to Darwin from this period, there are no recorded letters for the crucial period of the publication of the Variation, until the discovery of the present letter.Asa Gray (1810-1888) was one of the leading American biologists of the nineteenth-century, and was introduced to Darwin through Joseph Hooker, the head of Kew Gardens. The two became friends and lifelong correspondents, and Gray served as one of Darwin's most important sources of plant specimens. He was also one of the first to whom Darwin confided his theory of evolution by natural selection, and an 1857 letter from Darwin to Gray was used as evidence of intellectual priority when his and Wallace's papers were read at the Royal Society. Gray, a devout Christian, was a firm supporter of Darwin's theories, and was responsible for arranging the US publication of The Origin of Speci. Bookseller Inventory # 3684

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Darwin, Charles, Phillip Parker King and Robert Fitzroy

Published by Henry Colborn, London (1839)

Used First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Vanamounis Books (Seaforth, NSW, Australia)

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Item Description: Henry Colborn, London, 1839. Book Condition: Very Good. 1st. Three volumes in four (including Appendix to the second volume), octavo, with 48 etched and engraved plates and charts (one folding) after P.P. King, R. Fitzroy, A. Earle, C. Martens, T. Landseer, and others, eight folding engraved maps, six text woodcuts, half-titles in volumes 1-3 (none called for in the Appendix). Occasional spotting, the voyage narrative and appendix in matching contemporary half calf (rubbed) and marbled boards, the Darwin journal in sympathetic but non-matching contemporary half calf with spine decorations and marbled boards. London, Henry Colburn, 1839. First edition: Charles Darwin's first book, Journal of Researches into the Geology and Natural History of the Various Countries Visited by H.M.S. Beagle. The first two volumes and appendix of this complete set comprise the official commanders' narratives of the proceedings of the two expeditions, 1826 - 1830 under the command of Captain P. Parker King, and 1831 - 1836 under the command of Captain Robert Fitz-Roy. The Voyage of the Beagle is generally regarded as scientifically and intellectually the most important travel book of all time, providing the evidence for what would become Darwin's life-long quest to uncover the processes of evolution that has had such a profound effect on mankind in all spheres of human activity. For Darwin himself the voyage of the Beagle was "by far the most important event in my life, and has determined my whole career" (Life and Letters). As is usual with copies of the complete work sold by Colburn from late 1839 the Darwin volume is in the second state with an expanded title and without reference to its being the third volume of the complete narrative. Within a short time of publication Colburn was advertising the King and Fitzroy narrative as available in two volumes, quite separate from the Darwin journal which had been sold under its expanded title from at least August 1839. Offered with: 'The Darwin Experience', by John Van Wyhe with 27 rare removable facsimile documents of historical significance, National Geographic Society, 2008, pp 64, mint and, 'Darwin's Notebook', compiled by J Clements, Running Press, 2009, mint. Size: 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Bookseller Inventory # 002438

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Darwin, Charles, Oscar Gustave Rejlander, and Francis Ellingwood Abbot

Published by Studio of Oscar Gustave Rejlander (1871)

Used First Edition Signed

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From: Brick Walk Bookshop (West Hartford, CT, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: Studio of Oscar Gustave Rejlander, 1871. No Binding. Book Condition: Fine. No Jacket. 1st Edition. Fine. 4 x 2 1/2 inches. Original Carte de visite portrait of an older Charles Darwin in profile by noted Swedish/British photographer and Darwin collaborator (The Expressions of the Emotions in Man and Animals, 1872) Oscar Gustave Rejlander. The portrait is firmly and neatly signed on bottom center beneath the portrait by Darwin by the great man himself, and is signed in full by Rejlander on verso with his London studio address, 1 Albert Mansions, Victoria Street S.W. The carte de visite is also annotated on verso by American theologian Francis Ellingwood Abbot, "Received June 12, 1871 at Toledo, O. from Mr. Darwin in a private letter dated May 27." The Darwin/Abbot correspondence is at Harvard and includes the original letter from Darwin to Abbot in which he mentions sending along the Carte de visite as a token of his esteem and appreciation. "Francis Ellingwood Abbot (1836-1903) was a founder of the Free Religious Association and first editor of the radical journal, the Index. He developed an evolutionary philosophy of science and yearned to free humankind from pre-scientific religions, believing that people could escape the trap of agnosticism by adopting his vision of free religion." As such, Abbot was one of the first influential American supporters of Darwin's then radical ideas. A spectacular artifact in superb condition with exceptional association value and impeccable provenance. Darwin was a photography enthusiast. This is evident not only in his use of photography for the study of Expression and Emotions in Man and Animal, but can be witnessed in his many photographic portraits and in the extensive portrait correspondence that Darwin undertook throughout his lifetime. His close friend and botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker would come to call Darwin’s epistolary exchange of photographic images as his "carte correspondence". Hooker was jokingly lamenting his role as an intermediary for Darwin and his correspondents from around the globe in their exchange of carte-de-visites, or small photographic prints made in large numbers and printed on hard card for ease of exchange. While collecting photographic portraits of friends and relatives was not a pursuit unique to Darwin (the exchange of photographic images was a popular activity for many Victorians), when placed in the context of Darwin’s correspondence more broadly, we can see an interesting trend. When Darwin sent his photograph to a close ally, such as the Harvard botanist Asa Gray, or when he was given a photograph as a token of esteem by a colleague, such as Daniel Oliver at Kew, the image became more than just a physical reminder of likeness. It performed the same function that his correspondence as a whole did for him; it created and reinforced his experimental and scientific network. One of his correspondents was Oscar Rejlander, a well-known London-based photographer born in Sweden who integrated theater, classical art and photographic dexterity in all his work. Rejlander produced a number of photographs for Darwin of various forms of expression, the most famous of which was crying baby, later dubbed by the Victorian press as 'Ginx's Baby'. Rejlander also took the opportunity to make some portraits of Darwin. These turned out to be, in Darwin’s own estimation, "The best photographs of me". Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 1017

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Item Description: 1838. 3 pages, 8vo (182 x 117 mm), addressed in ink to 'Mr. Gould' and docketed 'Charles Darwin Feb. 1838', traces of red wax seal, slight damage to signature from opening of seal, edges a bit browned, creases from posting. £27,500An important early letter to the ornithological artist John Gould concerning the illustrations for the Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1838-43). It is now known that Darwin did not fully realise the significance of the inter-island speciation of the Galapagos finches until Gould studied Darwin's specimens; in fact, Darwin had not been diligent in recording the exact island locations for his specimens. John Gould (1804-81) was the outstanding ornithological artist of his day and was commissioned to describe the birds and draw the plates, 50 in number, for the Birds volume of the Zoology. His drawings were transferred to the lithographic stones by his wife, as stated on a printed note to the beginning of the plates: ''The accompanying illustrations, which are fifty in number, were taken from sketches made by Mr. Gould himself, and executed in stone by Mrs. Gould'. The publisher of the volumes was Smith, Elder & Co. The colouring was executed by Bayfield, who at the time was principal colourist for John Gould. The text was begun by Gould and completed by George Robert Gray. The letter reads as follows:My dear SirI have just seen my publisher. We have fixed to have fifty plates of birds, so will you at once take into consideration which are most worthy being done.Will you also oblige me by the favour of seeing Bayfield, & see whether he will undertake the birds (which are chiefly small ones) at something less than 5d a piece, as it is rather more than our estimate calculated upon.If he would also undertake my quadrupeds I should be very glad.- There will be about 28 plates, chiefly small animals. See if you cannot make for me some kind of agreement to take the whole at something under 5d.-It will be rendering me a very great assistance if you can effect thisYours most truly | Chas DarwinDarwin Correspondence Project 401. Bookseller Inventory # 3562

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Item Description: London: Henry Colburn, 1839, 1839. Octavo (233 × 140 mm) 3 volumes in 4 (vols. I–III and Appendix to vol. II). Attractive modern green half calf to style, double red morocco lettering pieces, flat bands reeded in gilt, repeated wave pallet in blind filling the compartments, marbled sides, tan endpapers. A wide-margined and generally clean set, some marginal foxing, particularly to the plates, which show off-set to the tissue-guards as usual, but overall a very good and handsomely presented set. 9 folding engraved maps by J. Gardner and J. and C. Walker; 47 etched plates after P. King, A. Earle, C. Martens, R. Fitzroy and others by T. Landseer, S. Bull, T. Prior and others. First edition. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science" (DSB). Vol. I contains King's account of the expedition in the Adventure made between 1826 and 1830, surveying the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. In Vol. II (and its appendix volume) Capt. Fitzroy described the narrative of the Beagle's second voyage, between 1831 and 1836 to South America, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia and other countries. In this set, the Darwin volume, "Journal and Remarks 1832-1836", is the first issue, printed before the end of January 1839, the month he was elected to the Royal Society, and so without the letters F.R.S. after his name on the second title. Freeman 10; Hill I, pp. 104–5; Sabin 37826. Bookseller Inventory # 80586

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DARWIN, Charles.

Published by D. Appleton and Company, New York (1876)

Used Signed

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From: Athena Rare Books ABAA (Fairfield, CT, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1876. Half title + TP + [v]-vi = Preface to the Second Edition + [vii]-ix = Table of Corrections + [xi]xvi = Contents + 1-688 + [689]-[692] = Publisher's ads + 1 blank leaf. Octavo. Second Edition, Early American Issue.A Rare Inscribed Copy of "Descent of Man" - in Darwin's HandThe First Use of the Word "Evolution" in Any of His WritingsInscribed by Darwin to "Mrs(?) Clarks(?) / with the author's / affectionate regards. / Ch. Darwin"Almost all presentation copies of Darwin's books are signed by the publisher's secretary. This copy presents an extremely rare example of Darwin signing a book himself. After "On the Origin of Species" (1859), this is Darwin's most important work. Having very carefully sidestepped the issue of human evolution in "Origin," Darwin waited twelve years before tackling the issue in this book which was first published in England in 1871. Having made the commitment of presenting his ideas on the subject, Darwin applied evolutionary theory to human evolution while providing further details on his theory of sexual selection. In addition, the book addresses many related issues, including evolutionary psychology, evolutionary ethics, the differences between the human races, the differences between the sexes, the superiority of men to women, and the relevance of the evolutionary theory to society as a whole. The word "evolution" appears for the first time in any of Darwin's writings on page 2 of this book. Descent went through a large number of revised editions, many of which Darwin edited himself. Some edits were minor, and some extensive. In late 11873, Darwin tackled a new edition of the Descent of Man. Initially, he offered the self-employed Wallace the work of assisting him, for which Wallace quoted a rate of seven shillings an hour. But, when Emma found out, she had the task given to their son George, so Darwin had to write apologetically to Wallace. Huxley assisted with an update on ape-brain inheritance, which Huxley thought "pounds the enemy into a jelly. though none but anatomists" would know it. The manuscript was completed in April 1874. Murray planned a 12-shilling half-price edition to replicate the success of the cheap revision of the Origin. The second edition was published on 13 November 1874 with the price cut to the bone at 9 shillings. It was generally the edition most commonly reprinted after Darwin's death and to the present. Publisher's original terracotta cloth with gilt lettering on the spine and decorated with black designs on the covers. Lightly used but a beautifully preserved copy nonetheless. Comes a custom clamshell box. ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AND MORE INFORMATION ON THIS BOOK IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST. SECOND EDITION, Early American Issue - INSCRIBED by Darwin. Bookseller Inventory # 648

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DARWIN, Charles; Capt. Robert Fitzroy; Capt. Philip Parker King.

Published by London Henry Colburn (1839)

Used Softcover First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Shapero Rare Books (London, United Kingdom)

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Item Description: London Henry Colburn, 1839. Three volumes in 4 (vols I-III and Appendix to vol II), 8vo., 9 folding engraved maps by J. Gardner and J. and C. Walker; 47 etched plates after P. King, A. Earle, C. Martens, R. Fitzroy and others, modern half calf over old marbled boards, marbled edges, occasional light foxing. An excellent example of the first edition of Darwin's first published book, also his most widely read, and the account of probably the most important of all nineteenth century voyages, for it was on this voyage that Darwin prepared for his lifework, ultimately leading to "The Origin of Species". Volume I contains King's account of the first expedition which surveyed the coasts of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego. He commanded this expedition in the "Adventure", accompanied by the "Beagle", first under Stokes and after his death by Fitzroy. The remaining volumes describe the second voyage of the "Beagle" which visited Brazil, Argentina, Chile, the Galapagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia, and other countries along the way. Fitzroy's account is contained in volume II with a separate appendix comprising a meteorological journal etc. Volume III is Darwin's account. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin's intellectual life and in the history of biological science" (DSB). Freeman 10; Hill 1, pp104-105; Norman 584; Sabin 37826. Bookseller Inventory # 87682

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DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882).

Published by London: W. Clowes and Sons, 1859. (1859)

Used Softcover First Edition

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From: Arader Galleries (New York, NY, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: London: W. Clowes and Sons, 1859., 1859. 8vo., (6 6/8 x 5 inches). Original publisher's cloth-backed printed grey stiff paper wrappers RARE, AND AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE COPY, in near mint condition, of the second separately printed issue of Darwin's contribution to the Admiralty Manual of Scientific Enquiry, and first issued there as "Geology" in 1849. Edited, and with an important essay on Meteorology, by Sir John Frederick William Herschel (1792–1871), the aim of the Manual. in "the opinion of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty [was] that it would be to the honour and advantage of the Navy, and conduce to the general interests of Science, if new facilities and encouragement were given to the collection of information upon scientific subjects by the officers, and more particularly by the medical officers, of Her Majesty's Navy, when upon foreign service; and their Lordships are desirous that for this purpose a Manual be compiled, giving general instructions for observation and for record in various branches of science. Their Lordships do not consider it necessary that this Manual should be one of very deep and abstruse research. Its directions should not require the use of nice apparatus and instruments: they should be generally plain, so that men merely of good intelligence and fair acquirement may be able to act upon them; yet, in pointing out objects, and methods of observation and record, they might still serve as a guide to officers of high attainment: and it will be for their Lordships to consider whether some pecuniary reward or promotion may not be given to those who succeed in producing eminently useful results" (Preface to the first edition in 1849). Charles Darwin completed his chapter on Geology in March of 1848, many years after the focus of his attention had turned to his theories of the transmutation and evolution of species, for which his is now celebrated. Nevertheless, one his earliest scientific interests was geology, and one of his earliest scientific mentors was the founder of modern geology, Adam Sedgwick (1785–1873). He attended Sedgwick's geology lectures in the spring of 1831, and in August accompanied Sedgwick to north Wales for two weeks in the field. "It was the best possible training, Sedgwick built up Darwin's expertise and self-confidence, introducing him to some of the most perplexing geological issues of the day" (DNB). Upon his return Darwin was offered the position of resident naturalist about the Beagle, that was to change his life, and the course of science forever. In this very rare offprint, his "Manual of Geology", Darwin explains patiently the practical ways in which geology can be studied upon the high seas: "A person embarked on a naval expedition, who wishes to attend to Geology, is placed in a position in some respects highly advantageous, and in others as much to the contrary. He is borne on the ocean, from which most sedimentary formations have been deposited. During the soundings which are so frequently carried on, he is excellently placed for studying the nature of the bottom, and the distribution of the living organisms and dead remains strewed over it. Again, on sea-shores, he can watch the breakers slowly eating into the coast-cliffs, and he can examine their action under various circumstances: he here sees that going on in an infinitesimally small scale which has planed down whole continents, levelled mountain-ranges, hollowed out great valleys, and exposed over wide areas rocks which must have been formed or modified whilst heated under enormous pressure. Again, as almost every active volcano is situated close to, or within a few leagues of, the sea, he is admirably situated for investigating volcanic phenomena, which, in their striking aspect and simplicity, are well adapted to encourage him to his studies" (pages [3]-4). Clearly Darwin put these methods to practical use himself during his voyage on the Beagle, and with spectacular results. Adam Sedgwick read Darwin's "Geological notes made during a survey o. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib1249

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Item Description: Hard cover. 56 plates & maps (some folding). Four vols. 8vo, orig. green cloth (very careful repairs to hinges & joints, Vol. III well-rebacked with orig. spine laid-down), spines lettered in gilt. London: H. Colburn, 1839. First edition of the full narrative of one of the greatest marine surveys of the 19th century. "The five years of the voyage were the most important event in Darwin’s intellectual life and in the history of biological sciences. Darwin sailed with no formal scientific training. He returned a hard-headed man of science, knowing the importance of evidence, almost convinced that species had not always been as they were since the creation but had undergone change. He also developed doubts of the value of the Scriptures as a trustworthy guide to the history of the earth and of man, with the result that he gradually became an agnostic. The experiences of his five years in the Beagle, how he dealt with them, and what they led to, built up into a process of epoch-making importance in the history of thought."–D.S.B., III, p. 566. In this set, the third volume with Darwin’s contributions, is the first separate edition, also issued in 1839. It bears the bookplate and signature, dated 1840, of Robert James Shuttleworth (1810-74), the famous botanist and conchologist. Very good set. ? Freeman 10 & 11. Bookseller Inventory # JHABES3121

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Charles Darwin

Published by Smith, Elder & Co, London (1844)

Used Hardcover First Edition

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From: Festival Art and Books (Machynlleth, POWYS, United Kingdom)

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Item Description: Smith, Elder & Co, London, 1844. Decorative Cloth. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. First Edition, 1st. 8vo, 225 mm, vii + 175 pp, folding map. Description of six specues of corals from the Palaeozoic formation of Van Dieman's Land by W Lonsdale pp 161-169. Inserted ads, dated Jan 1844 (not in all copies). Freeman ref F272. Near fine copy. Some sunning to the spine and covers but original cloth holding together well. Small split at top of front joint. Original yellow endpapers totally intact and little foxing. Ownership inscription on title page - WP Bennett 1844 - only ink addition. Book was boxed for presentation (1973) to Dr Hans Gaffron. Probably the rarest 1st edition Darwin - only 146 copies sold (according to Darwin, June 1846). Normal wear and tear, minor foxing, spine faded, no repairs on unusual damage. We are selling an entire first and early edition collection of Darwin and other Victorian naturalist. in many cases we have several copies of the same Darwin titles in similar condtion, including presentation copies. Please ask for a complete catalogue. Bookseller Inventory # 01277

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DARWIN, Charles (1809-1882), Robert FITZROY (1805-1865) and Philip Parker KING (1793-1856).

Published by London: Henry Colburn, 1839. (1839)

Used Softcover First Edition

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Item Description: London: Henry Colburn, 1839., 1839. 4 volumes 8vo., (9 x 5 6/8 inches). (Without the half-title in volume one). 47 engraved plates (spotted and a bit browned) and 9 folding maps by J. Gardner and J. and C. Walker, including one loose in pocket at end of volume II (one or two repairs at folds). Modern full navy morocco, gilt. Provenance: with the faint penciled ownership inscription of Rev. John Allen Wedgwood (1796-1882), who officiated at the wedding of his cousins Emma Wedgewood and Charles Darwin in 1839, on the half-title of volume III. "IT DETERMINED MY WHOLE CAREER" (Darwin) First edition, first issue of volume III, which is Darwin's "Journal and Remarks 1832-1836", and his first printed book, and a pleasing association copy. This celebrated voyage, which lasted five years, was the "key formative event in Darwin's life. It 'determined my whole career' (Autobiography, 76), giving him an unrivalled opportunity to make observations, collect animals and plants, and explore some of the most beautiful, desolate, and isolated places in the world. Under FitzRoy the voyage's objectives extended to include geophysical measurements, and the 'Beagle' was equipped with a variety of instruments and devices, including a lightning conductor and a large number of marine chronometers for measuring longitude. The Admiralty intended the officers to make a chain of exceptionally accurate measurements round the globe. The ship also carried out trials on Beaufort's wind scale" (Desmond, Moore, and Browne). Between 1832 and 1836 the 'Beagle' visited the Cape Verde Islands, Brazil, Montevideo and Buenos Aires, Tierra del Fuego and Cape Horn, the Falkland Islands, Patagonia, the west coast of South America (Chiloé, Valparaíso, Lima), most famously the Galápagos Islands, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia (Sydney, Tasmania, King George's Sound), the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, Mauritius, Cape Town, and St Helena and Ascension. In all these places Darwin collected a vast numbers of specimens: insects, birds, molluscs, small vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants, meticulously recording their provenance, appearance, and behaviour in his notebooks and diaries. Of these the specimens the greatest and most important by far became the birds from the Galápagos Islands, which the ornithologist and artist John Gould helped Darwin to classify on his return to England. The similarities and differences between the species inhabiting different islands, and between the island species and those of continental South America, gave rise to Darwin's initial thoughts on the possibility of transmutation of characteristics in species, and represents to history the origin of his revolutionary and controversial theories of evolution. Freeman 10; Hill I pp 104-5; Norman 584; Sabin 37826. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department. Bookseller Inventory # 72nhr162

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Charles Darwin

Published by Ray Society, London (1851)

Used Hardcover First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Festival Art and Books (Machynlleth, POWYS, United Kingdom)

Bookseller Rating: 4-star rating

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Item Description: Ray Society, London, 1851. Decorative Cloth. Book Condition: Very Good. No Jacket. First Edition. 1851/1854 Original cloth covers have been re-backed with matching vintage cloth. Some wear and a liitle loss to the head and tail of the spine. Bindings tight and square. Original yellow coated endpapers have been reinforced using matching paper. Blind-stamps only (no ink) from Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Text generally clean. Some browning but generally good. An excellent copy of an exceedingly scarce set - the first and only issue. Darwin spent much of his time for 8 years (beginning in 1846) onthis work. Pnly 800 copies were printed. - most still held by institutions. Bookseller Inventory # 01254

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Darwin, Charles

Published by Henry Colburn, London (1839)

Used Softcover

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Item Description: Henry Colburn, London, 1839. Voyage of the Beagle--Darwin's First Published BookDarwin, Charles (1809-82). Journal of researches into the geology and natural history of the various countries visited by H. M. S. Beagle . . . [i-iv], [vii] viii-xiv, 615pp. plus pp. 609-629 addenda; 16-page publisher's catalogue dated August 1839. 2 folding maps, 4 text wood-engravings. London: Henry Colburn, 1839. 235 x 146 mm. Original plum cloth (Freeman binding b), minor fading and spotting, spine skillfully and subtly repaired. Edges of first folding map a bit frayed, minor foxing, but fine otherwise. 19th century owner's name partly erased from front pastedown. Bookseller Inventory # 41456

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Charles Darwin

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Item Description: A fine one-page autograph letter signed by Charles Darwin, 6th February (1873) to Italian scientist Enrico Giglioli. In full, "Dear Sir, I am very much obliged to you for your kindness in having sent me your studies on the skull of a chimpanzee. This subject is most important and interesting; but I grieve to say that I cannot read Italian; I will, however, get my wife to translate parts to me. With all my best thanks and all good wishes, I remain, Dear Sir, Yours very faithfully, Ch. Darwin". In very fine condition. Enrico Giglioli was an Italian zoologist and anthropologist. Darwin’s Origin of Species (1859) spurred much scientific interest in chimpanzees, which led eventually to numerous studies of the animals in the wild and captivity, with the observers mainly interested in behaviour as it related to that of humans. Rare and desirable in this format. Bookseller Inventory # 000156

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Darwin, Charles

Published by D. Appleton and Company, New York (1860)

Used Hardcover First Edition

Quantity Available: 1

From: Quintessential Rare Books, LLC (Laguna Hills, CA, U.S.A.)

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Item Description: D. Appleton and Company, New York, 1860. Hardcover. Book Condition: Fine. 1st Edition. First Edition, First Printing. This is the First Issue of the American Edition. A beautiful copy. The book is bound in the ORIGINAL publisher's cloth with minor wear to the edges. The binding is tight with NO cocking or leaning and the boards are crisp with minor wear. The pages are clean with NO writing, marks or bookplates in the book. Overall, a wonderful copy of this First Edition in collector's condition. We buy Darwin First Editions. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-14746514032

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Item Description: Henry Colburn, London. 1839, 1st Separate edition. () Very good. [i-iv],[vii],viii-xiv,629,609-615,16,(4) pp. Octavo. Original grey / green blind stamped cloth. Gilt title on spine. Spine a bit darkened. Outer joints with a bit of professional repair as does the top and bottom of the spine. Top of text block dust soiled. Original yellow coated endpapers. Tips a bit bumpled. Two folding maps tipped into the text rather than in pockets. 4 intext woodcuts. A touch of offsetting to the folding maps. The text is very clean. Freeman variant 11a. This is the separate issue of Darwin's contribution to Fitzroy's Voyage of the Beagle. It is the same sheets as Volume three of the Voyage but with different spine titling. Although complete copies of the Voyage are not particularly rare, obtaining a nice copy of the separate issue of Darwin's contribution is getting more difficult today. Bookseller Inventory # 138657

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