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George Heap and Nicholas Scull

Published by Gerard Vandergucht, London (1754)

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Item Description: Gerard Vandergucht, London, 1754. N/A. Book Condition: Very Good. An East Prospect of the City of Philadelphia taken by George Heap from the Jersey Shore Published, London, 1754 Engraving by Gerard Vandergucht Set of 4 Size: 20 1/8 x 80 1/8" References: Martin P. Snyder, City of Independence: Views of Philadelphia Before 1800, 42-44; E. McSherry Fowble, Two Centuries of Prints in America: 1680-1880, A Selective Catalogue of the Winterthur Museum Collection, 23; Gloria G. Deak, Picturing America, 1497-1899, 99 ("largest and most important of the early engraved views of Philadelphia"); Nicholas B. Wainwright, "The Scull-Heap East trospect of Philadelphia," in Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, vol. 73, pp.16, 22-25; Stokes 6k Haskell, American Historical Prints, p. 18. Founded in 1680 on a site between the Delaware and the Schuylkill Rivers, Philadelphia was ideally situated for trade and by the mid 18th century, it had become the principal port on the Atlantic coast as well as the commercial and administrative hub of William Penn's province of Pennsylvania. In 1750, Thomas Penn, son of the founder, requested "a perspective view of the city," as a dramatic advertisement to attract more entrepreneurs, merchants and settlers to the city. George Heap, an accomplished local artist, undertook a detailed rendering, from the perspective of the New Jersey side of the Delaware. In 1752, he and the surveyor of the province, Nicholas Scull, advertised for advance subscribers to an engraving after Heap's drawing. But as he was about to sail for London to have his rendering engraved on copper, Heap suddenly died. Scull took over the project and, in London, entrusted the drawing to the highly regarded Flemish-born engraver, Gerard Vandergucht (1696-1766). The completed engraving was on a monumental scale, requiring four large folio sheets, when joined measuring 82 x 20 inches. It accurately depicts the bustling waterfront of Philadelphia, a windmill on an island and many sailing vessels, pennants flying, plying the broad river. The Penn family coat-of-arms is shown at the bottom of sheet 3, along with dedication to proprietors Thomas and Richard Penn. Sheet 4 features a detailed key, identifying streets, the Courthouse, the Statehouse (Independence Hall), a large number of steepled churches and the recently founded Academy (later the University of Pennsylvania). As Martin Snyder has written, "the use of almost seven feet of paper to portray less than a mile of waterfront, from present-day South Street to Vine Street permitted the details that is its great feature." The Scull-Heap print provides a unique view of the city that would become, a few years later, the seat of the Continental Congress and later, the capital of the newly independent nation. The grand image-the largest and most artistically significant view of any American city of its period-proved tremendously popular, and an initial press run of 500 copies was soon followed by a second of 250 copies (these with the corrected "Scull reading). Clearly, as Snyder writes, "the ravages of time upon such a giant and indeed unwieldy picture readily ; '"count for its extreme rarity today." The Scull-Heap engraving was not held in many important collections (Thomas W. Streeter, the Hon. J. William Middendorf, Laird Park, Pflaumer, Jay T. Snider) and we have located only six copies in American institutions: Colonial Williamsburg; Historical Society of Pennsylvania (2 copies, one in poor condition); Independence National Historic Park; New York Public Library (the I.N. Stokes copy); Winterthur Museum. Bookseller Inventory # 002410

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Item Description: Engraved by G. Vandergucht, London: Published according to Act of Parliament, 1 September 1754. Panoramic engraving on 4 folio sheets, each approximately 29½ x 23½ in. Condition: Each sheet with old horizontal crease approximately 9 inches from top edge, small losses to sky area unobtrusively mended, the crease neatly reinforced from verso with archival tissue; each with small triangular patches of discoloration in margins (from early mount). Other light, mostly marginal browning or light patches (not affecting images). Sheet 1: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to platemark in upper portion; upper right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue; Sheet 2: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to within platemark; Sheet 3: ample margins at left, top and bottom, right side trimmed to platemark in lower half; lower right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue; Sheet 4: ample margins at right, top and bottom, left side trimmed at or just outside platemark; right edge reinforced from verso with archival tissue. A GRAND PROSPECT OF PHILADELPHIA: A FINE COPY OF THE 1754 SCULL-HEAP EAST PROSPECT FIRST STATE, with misspelling "Skull" at top and bottom of sheet 3. Founded in 1680 on a site between the Delaware and the Schuylkill Rivers, Philadelphia was ideally situated for trade and by the mid 18th century, it had become the principal port on the Atlantic coast as well as the commercial and administrative hub of William Penn's province of Pennsylvania. In 1750, Thomas Penn, son of the founder, requested "a perspective view of the city," as a dramatic advertisement to attract more entrepreneurs, merchants and settlers to the city. George Heap, an accomplished local artist, undertook a detailed rendering, from the perspective of the New Jersey side of the Delaware. In 1752, he and the surveyor of the province, Nicholas Scull, advertised for advance subscribers to an engraving after Heap's drawing. But as he was about to sail for London to have his rendering engraved on copper, Heap suddenly died. Scull took over the project and, in London, entrusted the drawing to the highly regarded Flemish-born engraver, Gerard Vandergucht (1696-1766). The completed engraving was on a monumental scale, requiring four large folio sheets, when joined measuring 82 x 20 inches. It accurately depicts the bustling waterfront of Philadelphia, a windmill on an island and many sailing vessels, pennants flying, plying the broad river. The Penn family coat-of-arms is shown at the bottom of sheet 3, along with dedication to proprietors Thomas and Richard Penn. Sheet 4 features a detailed key, identifying streets, the Courthouse, the Statehouse (Independence Hall), a large number of steepled churches and the recently founded Academy (later the University of Pennsylvania). As Martin Snyder has written, "the use of almost seven feet of paper to portray less than a mile of waterfront, from present-day South Street to Vine Street permitted the details that is its great feature." The Scull-Heap print provides a unique view of the city that would become, a few years later, the seat of the Continental Congress and later, the capital of the newly independent nation. The grand image--the largest and most artistically significant view of any American city of its period--proved tremendously popular, and an initial press run of 500 copies was soon followed by a second of 250 copies (these with the corrected "Scull reading). Clearly, as Snyder writes, "the ravages of time upon such a giant and indeed unwieldy picture readily account for its extreme rarity today." The Scull-Heap engraving was not held in many important collections (Thomas W. Streeter, the Hon. J. William Middendorf, Laird Park, Pflaumer, Jay T. Snider) and we have located only six copies in American institutions: Colonial Williamsburg; Historical Society of Pennsylvania (2 copies, one in poor condition); Independence National Historic Park; New York Pub. Bookseller Inventory # 001894

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George Jacob Beck (1748-1812)

Published by Gouche on paper in gold-leaf Frame, Circa 1795, Provenance: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt, Detroit, Michigan, Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York (1795)

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Item Description: Gouche on paper in gold-leaf Frame, Circa 1795, Provenance: Dr. and Mrs. Irving Levitt, Detroit, Michigan, Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, 1795. 15" x 20". This incredibly rare watercolor by George Jacob Beck is the first view of Washington, DC and Georgetown. Beck completed this work at approximately the same time as his views of the Potomac River, commissioned by President George Washington in 1796 for his home in Mount Vernon. Washington was impressed by the artist’s ability to capture the beauty of his boyhood home and the site of his many land surveys, and purchased two companion views of Beck's Great Falls of the Potomac. As evidenced in his views of the Potomac and Georgetown, Beck’s careful attention to light lends an ethereal quality to his landscapes. The figures in this view are bathed in the last light of dusk while the creeping shadows blot out the trees in the foreground. This work served served as the original drawing for the aquatint Georgetown and Federal City, or City of Washington published in 1801 by Atkins and Nightengale, as well as for the decoration on Staffordshire china. Lauded as one of the greatest predecessors of the Hudson River School and a favorite artist of President Washington, George Jacob Beck’s artwork continues to be highly sought after today. Though listed in the 1806 Lexington directory as a "Portrait Painter," Beck is most famous for his landscape work, which unquestionably contributed to the popularity of American views during the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. He was the most experienced, if not the first of the early landscape painters to work in the United States. Six of his American views, engraved and published by T. Cartwright of London, have been collector's items for some time. This quote, taken from Virgil Barker of American Painting in 1950, demonstrates Beck’s enduring influence within the art world: "Among all the foreign-trained who came here in the Federal era, George Beck had the most substantial and the best mastered landscape style.Beck's superiority in craft enabled him to render the rocks with a strength sufficient to withstand the turbulent rush and falling weight of water.[and] to construct the forms of rock and tree, to give the solidity of earth, and even.to modulate values toward a distant horizon." Beck’s early philosophy is accessible in the captions he wrote for two of his views published in the European Magazine and London Review in 1785. In these captions he expressed his lifelong interest in science and mathematics. "Portraits of men, things and places," according to Beck, serve the same purpose in the mimetic arts as experiments do in science. He added that the usefulness of drawing is linked to its ability to provide insight into nature’s secrets. A transitional figure, Beck was caught between eighteenth-century rational thought and nineteenth-century Romanticism. With his pioneering depictions of the American wilderness, he formed a stylistic bridge to Cole’s romantic landscapes. He leaned toward the aesthetic of the picturesque, sacrificing accuracy for pleasing effects and celebrating ruggedness over smoothness. This view is taken from above Georgetown on the district side, and shows Analostan Island (the former designation for Theodore Roosevelt Island) in the Potomac River, with the Georgetown in the background on the left. In the far distance are the new boundaries of the city of Washington, founded jest several years before Beck painted this view. In 1791, President Washington selected the location for the new capital, establishing the new federal city several miles away fromGeorgetown on the opposite bank of the Potomac. Georgetown, which had been established in 1751 when the Maryland Legislature purchased sixty acres of land for the town during the reign of George II of Great Britain, was situated on the fall line- the farthest point upstream to which oceangoing boats could navigate the Potomac River. Georgetown eventually became a thriving port, facilitating trade and shipments of tobacco and other goods from colonial Maryland. Georgetown was frequented by President Washington, who worked. Bookseller Inventory # 003054

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872).

Published by London: George Catlin, Egyptian Hall, 1844. (1844)

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Item Description: London: George Catlin, Egyptian Hall, 1844., 1844. Folio (23 x 17 inches). Letterpress title-page, dedication "To the Reader" and 8 leaves of explanatory text. 25 EXCEPTIONALLY FINE HAND-COLOURED lithographs after Catlin by Catlin and McGahey, loose in ORIGINAL PORTFOLIO of half maroon morocco, purple cloth gilt by A. Tarrant, as issued. Provenance: 19th-century engraved armorial bookplate from a Russian library, and pressmarks on the front paste-down; late 19th-century engraved bookplate of H. Gallice on the front paste-down; ink library stamp of the Bibliotheque de San Donato on the front paste-down and in the lower margin of each plate; bookplate of Marcel Jeanson (1885-1942), ornithologist and bibliophile, on the front paste-down, his sale Sotheby's 28th February 1987, lot 113. THE FINEST EXAMPLE OF THIS FIRST ISSUE THAT WE HAVE SEEN, WITH PLATES HAND-COLOURED UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE ARTIST. First edition, AS ISSUED IN THE RARE ORIGINAL PORTFOLIO, AND AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE AND ATTRACTIVE COPY. George Catlin was the first artist to travel widely among the Plains Indians of North America and create an important body of paintings and graphics to illustrate their customs and artifacts. His purpose was both unselfish and romantic. He wanted, and labored unceasingly, to persuade his contemporaries that Native American culture should be honored and preserved. During the 1830's, Catlin gathered artifacts and turned his sketches and recollections of the prairie into paintings. In 1827, George Catlin, an illustrator from Philadelphia, became the first artist to attempt the perilous journey up the Missouri River, and the first to create visual records of his experiences traveling among the Plains Indians of North America. The artist himself best expressed his goal in the preface to the first edition of his North American Indian Portfolio: "The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." Over the next eight years, Catlin would travel extensively throughout the Western Plains of America doing just that, and accumulating his "Indian Gallery", which consisted of hundreds of oil paintings he executed presenting the appearances and customs of the 48 different tribes of Native Americans he encountered during his journey. Catlin began to display his Indian Gallery in 1837, touring it in the United States for the next two years before taking the show to London. Having established a name for himself with the success of the Indian Gallery, Catlin turned his attention to finishing his first book, "Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians ", which was first appeared late in 1841 in three large 8vo., volumes. As this book evolved it was to become one of the most important works on American Indians published in the 19th century. Not only is Catlin's work a wonderful description of his extensive travels and his career as an artist painting scenes of Indian life in the Midwest, but the book also contains hundreds of his illustrations that portray many aspects of Indian life: their costumes, ceremonies, dwellings, villages, buffalo hunts, and games. Catlin's project filled a great need. After Lewis & Clark's celebrated expedition up the Missouri River into the Pacific Northwest, Europeans read avidly of the sights and experiences of the voyage. They traced the route followed by the explorers, using the map that accompanied the wildly popular printed volumes on the journey. But a crucial aspect was missing from the accounts of the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Without pictorial documentation, Europeans (and Americans) were unable to visualize the unbelievable journey. This lack meant that the people, landscape, and customs of the vast American frontier remained abstract ideas-and much less vividly imaginable-to anyone who had not personally experienced the voyage. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib10

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 13 1/4 x 19 1/2 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 13 1/4 x 19 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100208r

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Woods, Colonel George)

Published by Pittsburgh (1784)

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Item Description: Pittsburgh, 1784. THE ONLY SURVIVING ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT OF THE FIRST PLAN OF THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH Pen and ink on parchment Sheet size: 13 ½" x 17 ¼" Provenance: Senator James Ross (1762-1847); Private collection, Pittsburgh. References: John Melish, Travels through the United States of America in the Years 1806-07 (Philadelphia, 1812) 54; John W. Reps, The Making of Urban America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965) 204-206; ibid., Town Planning in Frontier America (Columbia & London: University of Missouri Press, 1980) 181; Bruce Buvinger, Origin, Development, and Persistence of Street Patterns in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh, 1972). This remarkable document is the only available original manuscript of the first survey and town plan of Pittsburgh and stands as the Penns' charter of Pittsburgh. Every deed issued by Penns' Philadelphia Land Office referred to it and all subsequent real estate ownership in Pittsburgh's "Triangle" is based on this document. Three copies of the original map are recorded, but the other two were destroyed in the Great Fire of 1845, which burned nearly one thousand buildings and leveled nearly half of Pittsburgh. This copy survived as it was held outside the city, at the residence of Senator James Ross. The map was used by Ross, at a Supreme Court of Pennsylvania trial, during 1841. In his recorded deposition he stated "I had it sent to me by the Proprietaries' agent at the trial of the Commonwealth vs. McDonald. This parchment draft I saw in said office of Proprietaries 40 years ago." A two-line attest of authenticity, located at the lower left of the plan, dated December 29, 1841 and signed by James Ross, states "this is the parchment draft referred to in my deposition." On the verso of the document is an Allegheny County clerk's notation, "Recorded in the office for recording deeds . . .," dated February 19, 1842. A copy of the document (complete with Ross's attest of authenticity) is to be found in the Allegheny County plat book. The authenticity of the map has been further verified by Andrew E. Masich, president and CEO of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania who in an article for the Pittsburgh Tribune Review (Sunday, November 20, 2005) commented, " . . . it's a legitimate thing. It is one of the earliest maps of Pittsburgh." A settlement is recorded on the site, of what is now Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as early as circa 1760. On March 4, 1681, King Charles II signed the Charter of Pennsylvania and granted the territory to William Penn as payment of a loan in the amount of £16,000. Penn intended this to be a safe haven for persecuted Quakers, a religion he himself had converted to, but which was socially despised in Great Britain. By the eighteenth century, Pennsylvania also became a settlement for new immigrants to America, who found little opportunity in the already settled portions of the original colonies. However, there was little settlement of the western portion of the state due to constant Native American incursions. This was to change during the second half of the century. In 1754 the French and Indian War broke out. The Mississippi and Ohio Valleys had been under the control of the French and their defeat opened the path for settlement in western Pennsylvania. In 1758 Fort Duquesne, built at the strategic point where the Monongahela and Allegheny Rivers meet the Ohio River, fell to the British and was renamed Fort Pitt. According to early accounts, a small community of 200 houses, grouped in a tiny grid of rectangular blocks fronting on to the Monongahela, had formed around the fort within two years. Most of the inhabitants were fur traders. Under the. Bookseller Inventory # 000943

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Colonel George Woods

Published by Pen and ink on parchment, Pittsburgh (1784)

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Item Description: Pen and ink on parchment, Pittsburgh, 1784. No Binding. Book Condition: Very Good. [Colonel George Woods] Survey and Town Plan of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Pen and ink on parchment Sheet size: 13 ½" x 17 ¼" Pittsburgh, 1784 Provenance: Senator James Ross (1762-1847); Private collection, Pittsburgh. References: John Melish, Travels through the United States of America in the Years 1806- 07 (Philadelphia, 1812) 54; John W. Reps, The Making of Urban America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965) 204-206; ibid., Town Planning in Frontier America (Columbia & London: University of Missouri Press, 1980) 181; Bruce Buvinger, Origin, Development, and Persistence of Street Patterns in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh, 1972). Bookseller Inventory # 002404

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 18 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 18 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100188r

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Item Description: printed for the Author by T. Bensley, published by White, Cochrane, & Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, London, 1812. Broadsheet. (22 5/8 x 17 1/2 inches). Letterpress dedication to the Prince Regent, small format additional text leaf bound facing plate XL, small correction slip pasted onto p.26. 90 fine aquatint and stipple-engraved plates, printed in colours and finished by hand. Extra-illustrated with a fine contemporary watercolour of plate LII (Black Prince grapes), with a printed imprint from another plate altered in manuscript mounted at the bottom of the image. Contemporary olive green straight grain morocco, covers elaborately bordered in blind and gilt, expertly rebacked to style A fine copy of "one of the finest colour-plate books in existence" (S.T. Prideaux), the most famous of all English pomological works: this copy extra-illustrated with an original watercolour and with proof and early impressions of the plates. Originally published in parts between 1804 and 1812, the work contains depictions and brief descriptions of over two hundred and fifty varieties of fruit, the majority shown against striking dark aquatint backgrounds that have become Brookshaw's trademark. The images include seven plates of Cherries, ten of Plums and Apricots, fifteen of Peaches and Nectarines, five of Pineapples, seventeen of Grapes, nine of Melons, eleven of Pears and seven of Apples. Most of the drawings were taken from specimens in the Royal Gardens at Hampton Court, Windsor, Kensington Gardens, the Prince of Wales' house at Blackheath, the Duke of York's residence at Oatlands, but others came from the noble collections at Sion House, Strawberry Hill, Osterley Park and Chiswick House, and the private collections of connoisseurs such as James Maddock of Walworth, Dr. John Coakley Lettsom of Grove Hill in Camberwell and Sir Joseph Banks. Each fruit was originally painted by George Brookshaw and then engraved either by Brookshaw or his brother Richard; additionally, one plate (number XLVIII) is identified as being engraved by H. Merke. "The Pomona was intended to be an accurate record of the best available varieties of fruit and to encourage people to cultivate them. Brookshaw's introduction underlines the importance of the subject by recommending it to the infant Horticultural Society (founded in 1804): 'It should be the business of the Horticultural Society, to try experiments to improve the growth of fruit. How much so ever the subject has been neglected, it is of sufficient importance to demand attention.' It also expresses the author's and artist's own hopes for his book's value: 'If any hints given in the course of these sheets, should induce the lovers of fruit to make any discovery, to be the means of improving their gardens, the end will have been in a great measure answered for which this Work was executed'" ( Oak Spring Pomona ). By 1783 the Birmingham-born Brookshaw was a fashionable and successful cabinet-maker, known for his furniture with all-over painted decoration with figurative, landscape and, above all, floral themes, and with a list of highly-placed clients including the Prince of Wales. By the mid-1790s he had disappeared: Lucy Woods suggests that a scandal of some sort drove him to abandon his career and to live under an assumed name, working at a completely new career. She believes that A New Treatise on Flower Painting , published anonymously in 1797 and later (in the third edition of 1799) in the name of G.Brown, was actually by Brookshaw, whose A Supplement to the Treatise on Flower Painting published in 1817 has largely the same content - including 11 plates supposedly by Brookshaw but identical to those in the earlier work, where they were attributed to Brown. The Pomona thus marks the first public resumption by Brookshaw of the use of his own name, as well as the first indication of his new metier. This lovely copy includes the notable addition of an original watercolour of plate 53, an image of Black Prince grapes (bound facing the printed plate). Furthermore, this copy includes proofs of at least four plates (43, 44, 52 and 92), un. Bookseller Inventory # 24463

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100196r

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EDWARDS, George (1694-1773).

Published by London: Rickaby for Gardiner & Robinson; Sidney, 1802-1806. (1806)

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Item Description: London: Rickaby for Gardiner & Robinson; Sidney, 1802-1806., 1806. 7 volumes in 4. Folio (18 2/8 x 11 2/8 inches). Text in English and French. 362 EXCEPTIONALLY FINE engraved plates with original hand-colour, including 37 PLATES IN COUNTERPROOF (some very occasional light spotting). FINE CONTEPORARY ENGLISH BINDING of green straight-grain morocco, elaborately decorated in gilt, including inner dentelles, with the gilt-stamped supra libros of John Proby on each front cover, all edges gilt. Provenance: with the supra libros of John Joshua Proby, first Earl of Carysfort (1751-1828) on each front cover; with the bookplate of John Taylor covered by the engraved armorial bookplate of E. Boehm on the front paste-down of each volume; Sir Abdy, his small library label on the front paste-down of volume one, his sale Paris, 11 June 1975, lot 107. AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE, TALL AND ATTRACTIVE COPY, LIMITED TO 25 DELUXE COPIES, WITH MAGNIFICENTLY COLOURED PLATES, printed on paper watermarked "J. Ruse 1803" or "Ruse & Turners 1805". RARE. In his "Preface" to "Gleanings" Edwards writes: "Great parts of the prints in this present work were drawn and etched on the copper-plates immediately from the natural subjects which they represent; and many of the prints are coloured directly from nature, in their proper colours, by my own hand:; so that they may be deemed original drawings" (volume iv, page 9). In order to make these published images as close to the original watercolours as possible Robinson adopted the technique of counterproofing for 37 of the exquisite plates in this book: a method of "offset" printing whereby an image is printed from a freshly pulled print rather than from the copperplate. Counterproofs produce softer, lightly inked images with no platemarks, oriented in the same direction as Edwards'originals. John Joshua Proby, like his father before him, was a career politician. In 1789 he became joint guardian and keeper of the rolls in Ireland and was in Ireland when the rising broke out in 1798. He declared that the time was ripe for a union of Great Britain and Ireland, and on 21 April 1800 he described Pitt's measure as 'wise, politic, and advantageous to the two countries' (Cobbett, Parl. hist., 35.83). Carysfort wrote a pamphlet on parliamentary reform, published in 1783, and a collection of poems and dramatic works. He was 'esteemed a good and elegant scholar', but as a speaker 'his utterance is disagreeably slow, tedious and hesitating, perpetually interrupted by the interjections Ah! Ah!' (GEC, Peerage, 3.71). (G. F. R. Barker, rev. E. A. Smith for DNB). One of the most important of all eighteenth-century natural history works, "at its date of issue, the "Natural History" and "Gleanings" was one of the most important of all bird books, both as a fine bird book and as a work of ornithology. It is still high on each list" (Fine Bird Books). As a young man Edwards soon found himself in the company of the most influential natural historians, collectors and artists of the 18th-century. Among Edwards' first patrons was Sir Hans Sloane, he was taught to etch by the celebrated Mark Catesby (in 1754 he would publish the second edition of Catesby's "Natural History."), he worked with the Bartrams of Philadelphia and Linnaeus in Sweden. The first volume of "A Natural History of Uncommon Birds" was published to great acclaim in 1743, and gained him nomination for fellowship of the Royal Society although he withdrew his candidacy. Second and third volumes followed in 1747 and 1750 which won him the coveted Copley medal of the Royal Society. The last volume appeared in 1751 at which time he stated that age and infirmity precluded further work. However in 1758 he published the first volume of his "Gleanings of Natural History", the second in 1760, after which he sold his entire portfolio to the Marquess of Bute, ".resigned as bedell to the College of Physicians, and retired to a house in Plaistow. From there he still visited the college and the Royal Society and, stimulated by his drawings of South Ameri. Bookseller Inventory # 72nhr90

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872).

Published by London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall [but Henry Bohn] (C. & J. Adlard, printers of text), 1844 [or 1845]. (1845)

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Item Description: London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall [but Henry Bohn] (C. & J. Adlard, printers of text), 1844 [or 1845]., 1845. Folio (23 4/8 x 18 4/8 inches). Letterpress title-page and 9 leaves of text, loose as issued (a bit thumbed, short marginal tears, one or two of which have been repaired). 25 handcolored lithographed plates after Catlin by Catlin and McGahey lithographed by Day and Haghe, plates printed before letters, heightened with gum arabic and mounted on card within ink-ruled frames loose as issued (plate one with a small stain, some plates with minor spotting, one or two mounts with small surface tears). Preserved in modern maroon morocco backed portfolio. Provenance: from the library of Gerald F. Fitzgerald, with his bookplate on the inside front cover of the portfolio, his sale, Sotheby's London, June 11, 2013, lot 59 First edition, third (first Bohn) issue, the first issue with the plates hand-coloured and mounted on card. George Catlin was the first artist to travel widely among the Plains Indians of North America and create an important body of paintings and graphics to illustrate their customs and artifacts. His purpose was both unselfish and romantic. He wanted, and labored unceasingly, to persuade his contemporaries that Native American culture should be honored and preserved. During the 1830's, Catlin gathered artifacts and turned his sketches and recollections of the prairie into paintings. In 1827, George Catlin, an illustrator from Philadelphia, became the first artist to attempt the perilous journey up the Missouri River, and the first to create visual records of his experiences traveling among the Plains Indians of North America. The artist himself best expressed his goal in the preface to the first edition of his North American Indian Portfolio: "The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." Over the next eight years, Catlin would travel extensively throughout the Western Plains of America doing just that, and accumulating his "Indian Gallery", which consisted of hundreds of oil paintings he executed presenting the appearances and customs of the 48 different tribes of Native Americans he encountered during his journey. Catlin began to display his Indian Gallery in 1837, touring it in the United States for the next two years before taking the show to London. Having established a name for himself with the success of the Indian Gallery, Catlin turned his attention to finishing his first book, "he Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians " which first appeared in the fall of 1841. This book was to become one of the most important works on American Indians published in the 19th century. Not only is Catlin's work a wonderful description of his extensive travels and his career as an artist painting scenes of Indian life in the Midwest, but the book also contains hundreds of his illustrations that portray many aspects of Indian life: Their costumes, ceremonies, dwellings, villages, buffalo hunts, games, etc. Three significant maps showing Indian tribe locations of the period around 1840 further augment the illustrative plates. Catlin's project filled a great need. After Lewis & Clark's celebrated expedition up the Missouri River into the Pacific Northwest, Europeans read avidly of the sights and experiences of the voyage. They traced the route followed by the explorers, using the map that accompanied the wildly popular printed volumes on the journey. But a crucial aspect was missing from the accounts of the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Without pictorial documentation, Europeans (and Americans) were unable to visualize the unbelievable journey. This lack meant that the people, landscape, and customs of the vast American frontier remained abstract ideas-and much less vividly imaginable-to anyone who had not personally experienced the voyage. When Catlin first issued his volume in 1844, his animated, colorful, sympathet. Bookseller Inventory # 72lib1149

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Item Description: "Geo. Catlin. Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly" [i.e. Chatto & Windus], London, 1875. Folio. (21 3/4 x 17 3/4 inches). Letterpress title and plate list, 31 hand-coloured lithographic plates, all mounted on card within ink-ruled frames. Unbound as issued within publisher's brown cloth covered portfolio, original red morocco label on the upper cover, expertly rebacked to style, glazed yellow endpapers. Housed in a red morocco backed box. The very rare deluxe issue of the thirty-one plate edition of Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio, hand-coloured and mounted on card. This edition of Catlin's famous work on American Indians includes six additional lithographs, comprising two portraits, a group portrait of Ojibways, two tribal dance scenes, and a hunting scene. These six plates were evidently executed in the 1840s when Catlin envisioned a series of Indian "Portfolios," but they were not printed and issued until the present edition, making this the first complete edition of Catlin's portfolio. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. In a famous passage from the preface, Catlin describes how the sight of several Indian chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their vanishing way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. He painted around 600 highly realistic and powerfully projected portraits of Indians, carefully recording their costume, culture and way of life. In addition to publishing the present work, Catlin also spent from 1837 to 1852 touring the United States, England, France and Holland with his collection of paintings, examples of Indian crafts and accompanied by representative members of the Indian tribes. A financial reversal in 1852 meant that he lost the collection, but he spent his later years making several trips to South and Central America, sketching the natives there. Research by William Reese has demonstrated that the 31 plate issue of the Portfolio was not produced until the firm of Chatto & Windus purchased the copyright to the book from the famed bookseller Henry Bohn. According to the Chatto & Windus records, which survive, these were printed from the original lithographic stones, in 1871 and published circa 1875 with a list of plates (present here but often found lacking). The 31-plate issue is far rarer than any of the 25 plate issues, and only in this format can the extra six plates be found. Like the first edition of the Portfolio, the 31 plate edition was published in three formats: tinted on paper, hand-coloured on paper and a deluxe issue, hand-coloured and trimmed and mounted on card in the style of original watercolours. This final issue is the most rare and desirable. Of the 28 copies of the 31 plate issue located by Reese in his census, only two were of the deluxe issue, as here. Howes C243; McCracken 10; Wagner-Camp 105a; cf. Abbey Travel 653 (ref); cf. Sabin pp. 436 (25 plates only), William S. Reese, The Production of Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio, 1844-1876. Bookseller Inventory # 20987

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 20 1/2 x 14 3/4 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 20 1/2 x 14 3/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100194r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 20 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100195r

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BROOKSHAW, George (1751-1823).

Published by London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812. (1812)

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Item Description: London: T. Bensley for the author, published by White, Cochrane and Co., E. Lloyd and W. Lindsell, [1804]-1812., 1812. Broadsheets (23 ¼ x 18 ¼ inches). With the author's printed slip explaining the absence of three pineapple plates, 1 page of index (preliminaries with old vertical creases). 90 aquatints with stipple engraving by Brookshaw, printed in colors and finished by hand (one "Strawberry" plate with slight split at platemark). Contemporary crimson straight-grained morocco, elaborately decorated in gilt and blind (rebacked preserving the original spine). Plates watermarked H.S. & S. 1822, text watermarked J.Whatman 1811. Originally published in parts between 1804 and 1812 and dedicated to the Prince Regent. Many of the specimens were taken from the Royal Gardens at Hampton Court and Kensington Gardens, among other great British gardens, and include: 256 varieties of fruit are depicted in the 90 plates, the subjects include 7 plates of Cherries; 10 of Plums or Apricots; 15 of Peaches and Nectarines; 5 of Pineapples; 17 of Grapes; 9 of Melons, 11 of Pears and 7 of Apples. George Brookshaw's splendid "Pomona Brittanica" is a masterpiece among 19th-century British flower books. The publication of the "Pomona" marked the re-emergence of the acclaimed artist into the public eye after a total disappearance of nearly a decade. Initially a cabinet-make specializing in painted furniture decorated with borders of flowers, Brookshaw appears to have abandoned this career at about the same time as he parted company with his wife and began living with Elizabeth Stanton, and under the assumed name of G. Brown (c.1794-1804). During this time he earned a living as a teacher of flower-painting and on the proceeds of his first painting manual "A New Treatise on Flower Painting", 1797. Characterized by the highest standards of production and artistic quality, the superb illustrations that Brookshaw drew and engraved for the "Pomona" remain perhaps the most sumptuous and distinctive of the early 19th century. This magnificent and stylistically unique work took Brookshaw nearly ten years to produce. Rivaled only by Dr. Robert Thornton's "Temple of Flora," Brookshaw's 'Pomona' is considered to be the finest British botanical work from a time when England dominated the field with a very large number of great books. Brookshaw's fine illustrations make excellent use of the rich, modulated tones that the aquatint process creates. The elegantly arranged and richly colored fruits emerge from deep brown backgrounds or float on a softly mottled light ground, creating a presence unlike that of any other botanical illustrations. Brookshaw asserts in the preface that the "Pomona Britannica" was an enduring work created for the enjoyment and edification of "succeeding generations." Nissen 244; Pritzel 1182. For more information about this book, or a warm welcome to see it and other books in our library at 72nd Street, NYC, please contact Kate Hunter, M.A. Oxon, in the Rare Book Department. Bookseller Inventory # 002013

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MACDONALD, George.

Published by 1865 (1865)

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Item Description: 1865, 1865. Vol I - Headed: ALIC FORBES DESTINY with THE LITTLE GREY TOWN (struck through). 234pp 4to written on rectos only - text to line 19, p.299. (Conclusion to this chapter presumably added by Macdonald in proof.) Names changed (Peter to Wattie); much deletion and correction but varying in places from final text. Vol II - Headed: VOLUME II. 247pp 8vo written on rectos only - text begins with Chapter XXXIII which in the book ends vol I; text ends at end of chapter XXXII vol II - as in the printed book. Major deletions and corrections throughout - again text subject to further revision before publication. Vol III - Headed : THE VALLEY OF TWO RIVERS (struck through). VOL. III ALEC FORBES OF HOWGLEN 157pp 4to written on rectos only - text ends with Chapter 27 - (XXVIII in the printed book). Major deletions and corrections throughout; again many differences remain when compared with the printed text, including the ending, indicating further changes in proof. The leaves are unbound, each 'volume' tied with ribbon, in a purpose-made box. Each leaf has a word total added by the Author; the manuscript is marked in red crayon by the type-setter. Provenance: purchased from Margaret Troup, having been passed down through the Troup family from George MacDonald. This was the last manuscript retained by the family. Shaberman 20 (page 24) reports that the original title was to have been 'The Little Grey Town', rejected by the publishers Hurst and Blackett as 'not conforming to the then fashionable nomenclature in Fiction'. He does not mention 'Alic Forbes' Destiny' or 'Valley of the Two Rivers' also suggested in this manuscript. The novel is the most autobiographical of Macdonald's novels - the 'grey town' being Huntly Aberdeenshire where Macdonald was born and brought up. 'Howglen' is based on his childhood home of Upper Pirriesmill, known as 'The Farm', which was later purchased by Robert C. Troup, grandson of George Macdonald's uncle, James MacDonald. Characters in the book are based on real people: the 'barbarous' 'Murdoch Malison' is based on a Reverend C-- S--, a man 'with a severe, not altogether cruel temper, and a quite savage sense of duty'. Alec Forbes was written by Macdonald when he was living in London - the verso of the penultimate page of manuscript for vol. III is an address panel to him at Earles Terrace, Kensington, W. Bookseller Inventory # 56258

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 17 1/2 x 12 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 17 1/2 x 12 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100199r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 18 11/16 x 13 1/4 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 18 11/16 x 13 1/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100189r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 14 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 14 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100184r

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Item Description: Thomas Jefferys, London. N/A. Book Condition: Very Good. Black and white copper-engraving (1754-68). Sheet size: 22 3/4 x 38". Inventory#: p405pmat. "Probably the finest view of an American city made before the Revolution" (Swift and McCusker). It was separately issued in 1754, and also appeared in Jeffrey's "A General Topography of North America", 1768. Both issues are very rare. The Sheet consists of a grand view of Philadelphia from the New Jersey shore along the upper margin (the "East Prospect"), which is admirably supplemented by a plan of the city (lower left), and fine views of "The State House" (lower right), and "The Battery" (lower center). The view proper (the "East Prospect") is adapted from Scull and Heap's mammoth earlier view of the city on six sheets, 1754, but with revisions suggested in the main by Thomas Penn. The size was reduced to one large but manageable sheet, the supplementary views and plan were added, and the view itself revised to include the Jersey shore of the Delaware River. The latter alteration was made so that the city would clearly be seen as a protected river port. 0. Bookseller Inventory # 000405

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SCHEDEL, Hartmann; ALT, George (trans.)

Published by Anton Koberger for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, Nuremberg (1493)

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Item Description: Anton Koberger for Sebald Schreyer and Sebastian Kammermeister, Nuremberg, 1493. December 23, 1493. 297 leaves. [10], CCLXXXVI, [1] p. First edition in German. Imperial Folio. Printed Incunabulum. Two and three line Lombards. Gothic letter, 62 lines (variable) plus headline. Xylographic title page. Initial spaces not filled in. Without rubrication. 645 uncoloured woodcut illustrations by Wilhem Playdenuff and Michael Wohlegemut, repeated to 1,809 images. Colourful antiphonal vellum binding. Professionally rebacked with care. Front board's bottom corner repaired. New tie strings. Contemporary bi-colour banded fore-edge. Large paper, untrimmed. Housed in clamshell box with quarter leather backing by Felton Bookbinding, gold and blind tooled. Light pencil notation and a tiny 19th century reference sticker on front paste down. Unobtrusive stains and marks with faint foxing and occasional small tears. Two small black stains on fore edges. Leaf 279 is a replacement. The woodcut of Pope Joan with her baby (leaf 169) is not mutilated as is the case in some copies. However, it does have green underlining. Some leaves are misnumbered and there is minor restoration to odd leaves. A bit of endearing marginalia on half-title. A clean and attractive incunabula printing of one of the most important illustrated books, and a project of greater scope than any of its kind during the fifteenth century. There are three idiosyncrasies to this copy. First, Hugo Cardinal has a faint ghost due to double printing (CCXIII). Then a variant woodblock is used for S. Katherina von Senis (CCXXXIIIIr), and, most humorously, Saint Valentine's heart is inked out (CXXXVII). Bookseller Inventory # 102511

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 20 5/8 x 13 5/8 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 20 5/8 x 13 5/8 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100192r

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872).

Published by London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall, [1844]. (1844)

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Item Description: London: Geo. Catlin, Egyptian Hall, [1844]., 1844. Folio. (23 4/8 x 18 inches). 25 EXCEPTIONALLY FINE lithographs on thick paper after drawings by Catlin, drawn on stone by Catlin and McGahey, printed by Day & Haghe and HAND-COLOURED. 19th-century half crimson morocco (waterstained). THE FIRST IMAGES OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES OF THE UPPER PLAINS First edition. George Catlin was the first artist to travel widely among the Plains Indians of North America and create an important body of paintings and graphics to illustrate their customs and artifacts. His purpose was both unselfish and romantic. He wanted, and labored unceasingly, to persuade his contemporaries that Native American culture should be honored and preserved. During the 1830's, Catlin gathered artifacts and turned his sketches and recollections of the prairie into paintings. In 1827, George Catlin, an illustrator from Philadelphia, became the first artist to attempt the perilous journey up the Missouri River, and the first to create visual records of his experiences traveling among the Plains Indians of North America. The artist himself best expressed his goal in the preface to the first edition of his North American Indian Portfolio: "The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." Over the next eight years, Catlin would travel extensively throughout the Western Plains of America doing just that, and accumulating his "Indian Gallery", which consisted of hundreds of oil paintings he executed presenting the appearances and customs of the 48 different tribes of Native Americans he encountered during his journey. Catlin began to display his Indian Gallery in 1837, touring it in the United States for the next two years before taking the show to London. Having established a name for himself with the success of the Indian Gallery, Catlin turned his attention to finishing his first book, "The Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians " which first appeared in the fall of 1841. This book was to become one of the most important works on American Indians published in the 19th century. Catlin's project filled a great need. After Lewis & Clark's celebrated expedition up the Missouri River into the Pacific Northwest, Europeans read avidly of the sights and experiences of the voyage. They traced the route followed by the explorers, using the map that accompanied the wildly popular printed volumes on the journey. But a crucial aspect was missing from the accounts of the expedition of Lewis and Clark. Without pictorial documentation, Europeans (and Americans) were unable to visualize the unbelievable journey. This lack meant that the people, landscape, and customs of the vast American frontier remained abstract ideas-and much less vividly imaginable-to anyone who had not personally experienced the voyage. When Catlin first issued his portfolio, as here, in 1844, his animated, colorful, sympathetic views of Native Americans finally filled the void of imagery. Suddenly, Europeans and Americans were able to visualize the people and customs of whom they had read so extensively, and to gain a level of respect for the Native Americans, so often feared, misunderstood or misrepresented. The artist's stunning lithographs ranged from portraits to depictions of tribal ceremonies, from the anecdotal to the idealized. Catlin appealed to his readers with the thrill of the hunt and the mystery of ritual, and conveyed his respect for his subjects masterfully. The immediacy of his images is irresistible, drawing viewers into the scenes and portraits with unprecedented intimacy. But even when Catlin issued the North American Indian Portfolio, just fifteen years after his expedition, his crusade to preserve America's "Noble Savage" was failing. The Indians were beginning to give way to the expansion of the American frontier and to European. Bookseller Inventory # 000355

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 19 x 13 3/4 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 19 x 13 3/4 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100193r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 20 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 20 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100190r

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Ehret, George Dionysius

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Item Description: 0. No Binding. Book Condition: Please contact seller. 17 3/4 x 13 inches. This is a subtly splendid watercolor by Georg Dionysius Ehret, arguably the finest flower painter of the eighteenth- century Europe. Ehret's work stands as a preeminent accomplishment of European botanical art, and the reasons for this acclaim are immediately evident in the virtuoso draftsmanship and fine, nuanced coloring of these works. Born in Heidelburg to a market gardener, Ehret began his working life as a gardener's apprentice, eventually becoming a chief gardener for the Elector of Heidelburg and the Margrave of Baden, whose prize tulips and hyacinths he painted. Ehret soon moved on to a number of cities across Europe, collecting eminent friends and important patrons as he traveled. His list of benefactors included the most brilliant and celebrated natural history enthusiasts of his day, among whom was Dr. Christopher Trew, a wealthy Nuremberg physician who became his lifelong patron, friend and collaborator. From 1750 until Ehret's death in 1770, he and Trew collaborated on the publication of the important illustrated volumes Plantae Selectae and Hortus Nitidissimus, both of which added to the rising acclaim for the artist's considerable talents as a botanical painter. Also among Ehret's admirers were the Parisian naturalist Bernard de Jussieu and the great Swedish naturalist Linnaeus, and Ehret's illustrations are some of the first works to reflect the Linnaean system of classification. 17 3/4 x 13 inches. Painting. Bookseller Inventory # 100186r

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CATLIN, George (1796-1872)

Published by C. & J. Adlard for George Catlin, Egyptian Hall, London (1844)

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Item Description: C. & J. Adlard for George Catlin, Egyptian Hall, London, 1844. Folio. (22 5/8 x 16 3/4 inches). [Pp.1-2] letterpress title (verso blank); [pp.3-4] To the Reader; pp.[5-]20 text. 25 hand-coloured lithographic plates, on thick paper, after Catlin, drawn on stone by Catlin (2) or McGahey (23), printed by Day & Haghe. (Endpapers and tissue guards renewed, scattered minor soiling). Publisher's brown moire cloth boards, upper cover lettered in gilt, rebacked and retipped with dark brown calf First edition, hand-colored issue, of Catlin's Portfolio, a key work for any serious collection of Western Americana. Catlin published the first two issues of the North American Indian Portfolio simultaneously in late November 1844. The first issue was hand-coloured, and the second had tinted plates. Catlin originally envisaged publishing a series of linked but separate portfolios, each with its own theme: religious rites, dances, costumes, etc. Unfortunately, the first series was the only one that was ever published, and its production proved to be so taxing (both financially and physically) that Catlin sold both the publication and distribution rights to Henry Bohn. Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio contains the results of his years of painting, living with and travelling amongst the Great Plains Indians. Catlin summarized the Native American as "an honest, hospitable, faithful, brave, warlike, cruel, revengeful, relentless, -- yet honourable, contemplative and religious being." In a famous passage from the preface of his North American Indian Portfolio, Catlin describes how the sight of several tribal chiefs in Philadelphia led to his resolution to record their way of life: "the history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustrations, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man, and nothing short of the loss of my life shall prevent me from visiting their country and becoming their historian." He saw no future for either their way of life or their very existence, and with these thoughts always at the back of his mind he worked, against time, setting himself a truly punishing schedule, to record what he saw. From 1832 to 1837 he spent the summer months sketching the tribes and then finished his pictures in oils during the winter. The record he left is unique, both in its breadth and also in the sympathetic understanding that his images constantly demonstrate. A selection of the greatest of images from this record were published in the North American Indian Portfolio in an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible. In addition to publishing the present work, Catlin also spent from 1837 to 1852 touring the United States, England, France and Holland with his collection of paintings, examples of Indian crafts and accompanied by representative members of the Indian tribes. A highly important record of a "truly lofty and noble race . A numerous nation of human beings.three-fourths of whose country has fallen into the possession of civilized man . twelve million of whose bodies have fattened the soil in the mean time; who have fallen victims to whiskey, the small-pox, and the bayonet" (Catlin). Abbey Travel 653; Field 258; Howes C-243; McCracken 10; Sabin 11532; Wagner-Camp 105a:1; William S. Reese, The Production of Catlin's North American Indian Portfolio, 1844-1876. Bookseller Inventory # 26713

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ORWELL, George.

Published by London: Victor Gollancz, 1935 (1935)

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Item Description: London: Victor Gollancz, 1935, 1935. Octavo. Original black cloth, titles to spine in green. With the dust jacket. Housed in a black quarter morocco solander box by the Chelsea Bindery. A stunning copy in the dust jacket. The publisher's file copy with their rubber stamp to the front pastreedowbn and upper panel of the dust jacket. First UK edition (first published in the US in the previous year), first impression, of Orwell's second book and first novel. Orwell's book, the result of five years service as a police officer in the Indian Imperial Police in Burma 1922-7, was initially rejected by Gollancz amid concerns that this caustic critique of colonialism might be considered libellous to those portrayed, so it was first published further afield in America. On its first publication in the UK, as here (with names changed to avoid libel cases), the novel was well received, at least among the literati, with Cyril Connolly reviewing it in the New Statesman as "an admirable novel. It is a crisp, fierce, and almost boisterous attack on the Anglo-Indian. The author loves Burma, he goes to great length to describe the vices of the Burmese and the horror of the climate, but he loves it, and nothing can palliate for him, the presence of a handful of inefficient complacent public school types who make their living there. I liked it and recommend it to anyone who enjoys a spate of efficient indignation, graphic description, excellent narrative, excitement, and irony tempered with vitriol.". Bookseller Inventory # 90849

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ALCEDO, Antonio de (1735-1812) - THOMPSON, George Alexander (translator and editor).

Published by London , Cambridge and Oxford : James Carpenter et al., 1812. (1812)

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Item Description: London , Cambridge and Oxford : James Carpenter et al., 1812., 1812. ALCEDO, Antonio de (1735-1812) - THOMPSON, George Alexander (translator and editor). The Geographical and Historical Dictionary of America and the West Indies. Containing an entire translation of the Spanish work of Colonel Don Antonio de Alcedo. London , Cambridge and Oxford : James Carpenter et al., 1812. 7 volumes: 5 volumes of text, 4to., (10 2/8 x 8 2/8 inches). Half-title in volume III only (preliminaries quite spotted). Contemporary diced calf, each panel elegantly decorated with borders of gilt fillets and blind roll tools of lilies surrounding a large central six pointed star of gilt fillets and blind foliate roll tools, spines finely decorated in five compartments with small gilt tools (expertly rebacked preserving the original spine). With 5 MAGNIFICENT AND EXTREMELY FINE large engraved folding maps by Aaron Arrowsmith in 20 folding mapsheets, each with contemporary hand-colour in outline, dissected and laid down on linen, folding into 2 book-style boxes uniformly bound with the text volumes in contemporary diced calf gilt. Provenance: From the library of the Earls of Bradford, at Weston Park , Shropshire , with their engraved 19th-century armorial bookplate on the front paste-down of each volume. THE MOST IMPORTANT PRINTED ATLAS OF THE AMERICAS OF ITS DAY First edition in English, first published in Madrid as "Diccionario geográfico-histórico de las Indias Occidentales ó América: es á saber: de los reynos del Perú, Nueva España, Tierra Firme, Chile, y Nuevo reyno de Granada" in five volumes from 1786 to 1789. The EXCEPTIONALLY FINE folding maps are in effect the most important printed atlas of the Americas of the early 19th-century, and are of: "A Map of the United States of North America Drawn from a Number of Critical Researches", the title within a fine vignette showing Niagara Falls, London: A. Arrowsmith, 1796, Additions 1802, 4 sheets (each 25 x 29 inches), each laid down on cartographic linen in 12 sections, trimmed with blue silk, and with the short-title in manuscript on vellum finger tabs. A FINE EXAMPLE OF ARROWSMITH'S IMPORTANT MAP of America, first issued 1796, this is the second edition with Additions to 1802, third issue with Arrowsmith's address given as "10 Soho Square", and Arrowsmith is now styled "Hydrographer to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales". The 1802 edition is the last of Arrowsmith's large American maps to be issued before the Louisiana Purchase and it is known that Thomas Jefferson ordered himself a copy at about the same time as the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. It is also the edition that Lewis and Clark consulted for their monumental expedition. Arrowsmith's 'Map of the United States of North America' is the most desirable from his well noted career. Stephens 79 (e). "A Map Exhibiting all the New Discoveries in the Interior Parts of North America", January 1st, 1795 and additions to 1811, additions to June 1814, 4 sheets (each 25 x 29 4/8 inches), each laid down on cartographic linen in 12 sections, trimmed with blue silk, and with the short-title in manuscript on vellum finger tabs. This issue incorporates Lewis and Clark's discoveries and other explorers, and remaps the entire continent west of the Mississippi. The changes between this and the previous 1811 edition "are monumental" (Rumsey). "Outlines of the Physical and Political Divisions of South America Delineated by A. Arrowsmith Partly from Scarce and Original Documents, Published before the Year 1806 but principally from manuscript Maps & Surveys made between the years 1771 and 1806. Corrected from Accurate Astronomical Observations to 1810", with insets of the Orinoco and Meta Rivers, and Patagonia, showing Tierra del Fuego and the Falkland Islands, London: A. Arrowsmith, 4th January 1811, Additions to 1814, 1817, 6 sheets (each 32 x 40 4/8 inches), each laid down on cartographic linen in 16 sections, trimmed with blue silk, and with the short-title in manuscript on vellum finger tabs. "A New Map of Mexico and Adjacent Provinces, c. Bookseller Inventory # 002579

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