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Verbiest, Ferdinand, S.J. (1623-1688)

Published by presented to the Emperor 6 March, [Beijing: (1674)

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Item Description: presented to the Emperor 6 March, [Beijing:, 1674. FIRST EDITION.. 39.5 x 19.9 cm. Small folio, Two Volumes: 106 double-page woodcuts. The Jesuit Astronomical Observatory at Beijing. With 105 Double-Page Woodcuts of Astronomical Instruments & the Observatory First edition, printed by the Jesuits in Beijing, of this magnificent woodcut book depicting the observatory and scientific instruments designed by the Jesuits for the emperor of China. This is a very rare book: this copy was prepared for the Chinese market, probably for the use of the emperor and the functionaries at the observatory. There was another issue prepared for export with an additional woodcut opening with the title in Latin, the ?Liber Organicus Astronomiae Europaeae.? This work is one of the greatest masterpieces of Sino-European printing. The woodcuts were undoubtedly done by Chinese artists working after Verbiest?s drawings, or after his directions. ?Very soon after his first visit to Peking in 1601, Matteo Ricci, S.J. (1552-1610), the ?founding father? of the Jesuit Mission in China, was well aware of the Emperor?s fondness for European clocks and other instruments such as harpsichords etc., and the former presented an opportunity to enter the Court. Shortly thereafter, he would understand that European astronomy and mathematics were unbeatable challengers of contemporary Chinese science ? for several centuries in a state of decline ? in calculating a correct calendar and reliable eclipse predictions, both very important guarantors of social and dynastic stability and continuity. Apart from this, the mechanical sciences would also became a first class vehicle to penetrate the highly sophisticated circles of mandarins and courtiers, whose curiosity about European things never seen and about new astonishing techniques struggled with their loyalty to their own uncontested traditions, with highly varying individual attitudes as a result. By all this European science appeared to be an appropriate vehicle to approach the Chinese upper class, and, implicitly, to introduce Christianity in China.??Golvers, Ferdinand Verbiest, S.J. (1623-1688) and the Chinese Heaven, p. 15. In 1629 the Jesuits succeeded in establishing an academy for western mathematical sciences in Beijing. The newly established Ch?ing Dynasty nominated Adam Schall von Bell in 1644 as acting director of the ancient Imperial Board of Astronomy, which had the sole authority to calculate and promulgate the yearly Chinese calendar. As a result, Schall and his fellow Jesuits acquired considerable prestige in the highest levels of Chinese society and government. The newly arrived Verbiest (1623-88) became Schall?s assistant in 1660. With Schall?s death in 1666, Verbiest was the only westerner commanding the astronomical knowledge needed at the Chinese Observatory; he was appointed director in 1669. The Emperor K?ang Hsi was a young and intellectually curious ruler who was fascinated by European science and technology. Verbiest was elevated to Mandarin rank and often accompanied the emperor on his travels around the country. Verbiest designed and built a series of instruments for observation, including a quadrant, six feet in radius; an azimuth compass, six feet in diameter; a sextant, eight feet in radius; a celestial globe, six feet in diameter; and two armillary spheres, zodiacal and equinoctial, each six feet in diameter. These were all very large, made from brass, and mounted on highly decorated stands contrived in the form of lions, dragons, flaming pearls, and other oriental motifs. The technology is entirely European while the decorative features are very Chinese. The inspiration and model for this book was clearly Tycho Brahe?s ?Astronomiae Instauratae Mechanica? of 1598. In the present work, the woodcuts display not only the instruments themselves, but show in great detail the processes of their manufacture, with the tools and implements used to produce them; the alignment and adjustment of their flat and curved surfaces; details of the gearing and screws used to adjust and dir. Bookseller Inventory # 3063D

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Homer. Chapman, George (c. 1559-1634), translator

Published by printed [by Richard Field] for Nathaniell Butter, ca., London: (1612)

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Item Description: printed [by Richard Field] for Nathaniell Butter, ca., London:, 1612. FIRST EDITION.. 28 x 18.5 cm. Folio: [?]1, *6(-*1, bank), A-Ff6, G8 (-Gg8, blank), [?]2. First Edition of Chapman?s Complete Translation. A Peerless Copy First edition of the complete text, in 24 books, of George Chapman?s celebrated landmark translation of Homer?s ?Iliad?, one of the foundational works of Western literature. In this edition, the final 12 books appear for the first time and the first and second books are rewritten. ?The unsigned sheet containing the sonnets to Viscounts Cranborne and Rochester and to Sir Edward Philips is a great rarity, only about six copies having it can be traced.?(Pforzheimer)Chapman published his translation of the first 7 books of the ?Iliad? in 1598. The first 12 books were published ca. 1609; the complete work in 24 books appeared ca. 1612. Chapman would go on to translate Homer?s ?Odyssey?, which he published in two parts, in 1614 and 1615. The ?Iliad? and ?Odyssey? were then published as ?The Whole Works of Homer? in 1616.Chapman was one of the great Elizabethan playwrights and poets, and it can ?and has- been said that his translation of Homer, ?make large claims not only as interpretations of Homer but as English epics.?(Lord)?Chapman was no straightforward translator. Although he taught himself Greek, referring as he worked to Spondanus' parallel Latin translations (1583) and to Scapula's Greek?Latin lexicon (1st ed. 1579), he did not provide literal English versions of his originals; rather, he personalized the epic, appropriating his source and making Homer a writer of the early modern moment. Chapman also digressed from the Greek to stress his own interpretations of the central players. In Hector in the Iliad was found a type who compromises morality to acquire divine spirit. In Odysseus in the Odyssey could be located a humanist protagonist who seeks salvation, regeneration, and enlightenment through stoical dedication.?(Mark Thornton Burnett. ODNB)?The vigour inherent in his lines is Chapman?s greatest achievement. Pope (Chapman?s most famous admirer) chisels a cameo where the Elizabethan hammers out a vast piece of statuary. And the piece of statuary is at once inspired by the great Greek original and an independent poem? Chapman has taken the only path a translating poet can travel: he has determined that it is his business to provide, not a word-for-word version of the original, but a poem that attempts to recreate the spirit of the original in an alien tongue? In all, Chapman?s ?Iliads? must be accounted one of the major poetic achievements of an age rich in achievement. Here is a poet?s echo of a poet ?an Elizabethan Englishman calling across the centuries to ancient Greece.?(Nicoll)"Whatever our views may be on the authorship of the Homeric poems, there is no doubt of their astonishing quality. They combine legends of a very distant past with a lively sense of the living scene, and though their characters are heroes and heroines, they are remarkably real. The story is told with a great simplicity, but this makes its episodes more dramatic, and in their greatest moments they contain some of the greatest poetry in the world. The plot moves with an unusual speed and the climaxes in both poems make an overwhelming impact. The rich, traditional language is ready for every occasion and, despite its richness, helps to maintain the essential simplicity. The poems are variously exciting, humorous, pathetic, and dramatic, and despite their fantastic elements, never far from common humanity. The similes present a whole world of contemporary people and things that lie outside the actual heroic tale, and the description of the shield of Achilles is surely the poet?s vision of his own world, as he knew it in war and peace. The poet or poets fully deserve their place at the beginning of European literature, since they have marked out for succeeding generations what the poetry of action and suffering ought to be." (OCD) STC 13634; ESTC S119234; Pforzheimer 169 Chapman?s complete translation of Homer?s ?Iliad? This. Bookseller Inventory # 3098D

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Shakespeare, William (1564-1616); Marlowe, Christopher (1564-1593); Chapman, George (1559-1634); Spenser, Edmund (c.1552-1599), Jonson, Benjamin (circa 1572-1637); et al.; Allott, Robert (fl. 1600), compiler

Published by For N[icholas] L[ing]. C[uthbert] B[urby]. and T[homas] H[ayes],, London: (1600)

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Item Description: For N[icholas] L[ing]. C[uthbert] B[urby]. and T[homas] H[ayes],, London:, 1600. 15 x 9.2 cm. Octavo: [12], 494 [i.e. 510] pp. Collation: A-Z8, Aa-Kk8 (lacking blank leaves A1, A2, and Kk8) One of the Most Celebrated and Most Important Contemporary Anthologies of Elizabethan Poetry. With 91 Extracts from Shakespeare including passages from Romeo & Juliet ?This volume is a compilation of quotations of various lengths, generally with sources noted but not always accurately, taken from the poetical works of some fifty Elizabethan writers. There are included 91 genuine extracts from Shakespeare?s works, mostly (63) derived from ?Venus and Adonis? and ?Lucrece? but all from plays or poems that had been printed before 1600.?(Pforzheimer)?Of the five Shakespeare plays from which extracts are incorporated in the volume (Love?s Labour?s lost, Henry IV, Part I, Richard II, Richard III, and Romeo & Juliet), Romeo & Juliet is the most heavily represented, signaling the play?s popularity, or perhaps utility, in the period.?(Roberts, Companion to Shakespeare?s Works, The Tragedies)The extracts are arranged alphabetically under subject-headings, and the author's name is appended in each case. Spenser is quoted 225 times, Shakespeare 91, Daniell 115, Drayton 163, Warner 117, Chapman 83, Ben Jonson 13, and Marlowe 33.John Payne Collier notes that, in addition to ?Venus and Adonis? and ?Lucrece?, Shakespeare?s ?Loves Labours Lost? is quoted twice, ?Henry IV part One? twice, ?Richard II? five times, ?Richard III? five times, and Romeo and Juliet 11 times.?[Allott?s ?Parnassus?] is a large poetical dictionary with 2350 items, a work Moss claims is ?an attempt to replace the ancient canon of authors and rewrite commonplaces in the language of a new canon of modern poets? (Moss, 210)? Allott, then, was an important agent in the process of redirecting texts that normally circulated in manuscript and found their resting places in private collections of individual compilers into the more public world of print. The poetical and prose collections for which he was directly responsible and those with which he was otherwise connected represent an important moment of late Elizabethan literary anthologizing that signaled print's growing importance as the medium of literary transmission.?(Marotti, ODNB) Bibliotheca Anglo-Poetica 1; Grolier, Langland to Wither 3; Hayward 38; Pforzheimer 358; Case, Poetical Miscellanies, 23(a); Bartlett, Shakespeare: Original and Early Editions of the Quartos and Folios, His Source Books, and those Containing Contemporary Notices (Elizabethan Club, Yale), No. 299 Bound in 17th c. blind-ruled sheepskin. A very nice, complete copy with just a little soiling to a few leaves. With an intricate woodcut device on the title page. FIRST EDITION, the issue with the dedication leaf to Thomas Mounson signed R.A. Bookseller Inventory # 3091D

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Item Description: Typis Joannis Blaeu,, Amsterdam:, 1663. FIRST EDITION.. 56 x 38 cm. Two Large Folio Volumes: Vol I: 2 ff. (General printed title conjugate with dedication), 2 ff. ("Ad lectorem"), 1 f. (Dedication), 2 ff. (Printed section title, half title), 1-253 pp., 1 f. (Index leaf). Illustrated with an engraved frontispiece and 74 plates. Vol II: 2 ff. (Title and half title), 54, 40, 315 pp.; 1 ff. (index leaf) Lacking the frontispiece. Illustrated with 44 plates, including a folding plate of the Obeliscus Pamphilius not recorded by Koeman. Rome & The Papal States. The Very Rare ?Theatrum Italiae? With 118 Folding & Full page Engraved Illustrations A fine set of one of Joan Blaeu?s most magnificent productions. This set is very rare, owing probably to the fire that ravaged Blaeu?s workshop in 1672, the year before the publication of these ?town books? This copy has an additional plate, not recorded by Koeman, of the Obeliscus Pamphilius, in volume 2.The two volumes are profusely illustrated with town views, architectural plans, ancient, Renaissance, and Baroque architecture (including many villas); and sculpture. The vast majority of these are double-paged, with a number of fold-out plates of obelisks and three very large, composite engravings. The plates are rarely signed and those that are have a variation of ?Excudebat Ioannes Blaeu? A number of the engravings are based on earlier works: many of the obelisks derive from the works of Kircher; the images of the moving of the Vatican obelisk are taken from Fontana.List of engraved plates. All are double page unless otherwise noted. Engravings within the text are noted as ?text engravings.?Volume I:1. Roma Nova: engraved folding map of Rome, with an engraved dedication to Flavio Chigi.2. Ancona3. Arcus Anconitanus (single page) dedicated to Balthasar van der Goes4. Acquapendende5. Rocca Contrada (Arcevia)6. Rimini7. Plan of Rimini (single page)8. Arcus Arimensis (single page)9. Asculum Picenum10. Assissi11. Bononia (with an added paper extension)12. Piazza Maggiore, Bologna (text engraving, p. 68)13. Fons Bononiensis, i.e. Giambologna?s Neptune fountain, signed: ?Excud I: Blaeu? 14. The medieval towers Asinella and Garisenda, Bologna (text engraving, p. 70)15. Plate with four views of Bologna: Palazzo del Podestà, Pa;azzo Maggiore, Studio Publico (ext.), Studio Publico (cortile).16. Plate with two views: San Michele in Bosco and il Convento de? Padri della Certosa (single page)17. Felsina, sive Bononia Antiqua (reconstruction of the ancient city by Ovidio Montalbani (1601-1672))18. Cesena19. Villa Farnese at Caprarola (exterior)20. Caprarolae Interna (cross section of Villa Farnese)21. Ichnographic plan of Villa Farnese22. Plate with two views after a painting by Georg Hoefnagel (1542-1601): Nocera Umbra and Castelnuovo di Porto. The plate is signed ?excudebat Ioannes Blaeu?23. Civitavecchia24. Civita Nova in Piceno25. Gubbio26. Fabriano (with a charming vignette of a paper mill)27. Fanum Fortunae (Fano)28. Faventia, vulgo Faensa29. Ichnographic plan of Ferrara30. Forum Sempronii, vulgo Fossombrone31. Large Folding panoramic view (composed of several plates joined together) of Frascati and the surrounding villas: Mondragone, Villa Tusculana, Villa Borghesia, La Ruffina, La Ruffinella, Belpoggio, Acquaviva, Arrigone, and the hermitage of the Camaldolesi.32. View of the hermitage of the Camaldolesi33. Imola34. Loreto35?40. 6 plates (five folding) of the Basilica of Loreto and the Renaissance enclosure surrounding the House of the Virgin within41. Macerata 42. Monte Fiascone (text engraving, p. 147)43. Neptunium (Nettuno) (text engraving, p. 149)44. Norsia45. View of the hermitage of the Camaldolesi at Monte Corona near Perugia46. Perusia Augusta (Perugia)47. Pesaro48. Pesaro (2nd view)49. Sciographia Templi Fortunae Praenestae, signed ?Ioannes Blaeu excudit?50. Orthographia Templi Fortunae Praenestae51. Senogallia (Senigallia)52. Spoleto53. Terracina54. Tuder, vulgo Todi55. Tibur, vulgo Tivoli56. Temple of the Sibyl at Tivoli (text engraving, p. 186)57. Casc. Bookseller Inventory # 2157D

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Horace. Horatius Flaccus, Quintus (65-8 B.C.)

Published by Johann Reinhard, called Grüninger, 12 March,, Strasbourg: (1498)

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Item Description: Johann Reinhard, called Grüninger, 12 March,, Strasbourg:, 1498. 298 x 222 mm. Folio: Collation: [*]6, A-V6, X-Z6, AA-II6, KK-LL8; [**]6 The Grüninger HoraceWith 5 Woodcuts Skillfully Painted by a Contemporary ArtistWith Contemporary Annotations This copy is partially rubricated and is annotated, in Latin, throughout in at least two contemporary hands. The early annotations are intact, having been spared by the binder?s knife, and consist of metrical notations, citations from other authors, and comments. There are also two glosses in Greek (leaves S6v and FF1r) as well as an apparent note in German (leaf FF6). An added manuscript index for the ?Epistolae? is bound after the final text leaf. The readers have also made corrections and a few notable additions (e.g. ?Cunnus CXXIX 3?) to the main index of words. The annotators cite more than twenty authors, both ancient and contemporary, as well as the Bible. Among the ancient authors cited are Aesop, St. Ambrose, St. Augustine, Aulus Gellius, Cicero, Ovid, Diodorus Siculus, Juvenal, Lactantius, Pliny, Plutarch, St. Jerome, Seneca, and Virgil. The contemporary and near-contemporary authors cited include: Michael Marullus, Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini, Mantuan, Antonio Mancinelli (commentary on Juvenal), Badius Ascensius (?Sylvae?), Publio Fausto Andrelini, and Erasmus (?Adagia?).The most frequently cited authors are Juvenal (13 citations) and Badius Ascensius (12 citations from the ?Sylvae?). One reader also shows a fashionable interest in the ?Adagia? of Erasmus. He identifies 23 separate adages in the course of the text and mentions Erasmus? work by name at least three times. He also makes a reference to an epistle of Publio Fausto Andrelini of Forli (1460-1518) that might be the letter that Erasmus asked Andrelini to write as a preface to the ?Adagia? Hain 8898; Goff H 461; BMC I, 112; Polain 1989; Proctor 485; Walsh 182; Fairfax Murray (German) 205; Rosenwald Collection 188; Dibdin, Bibl. Spenceriana II, 87-95. For Grüninger, his illustrated books, and Locher?s edition of Horace, see Mark Morford, Johann Grüninger of Strasbourg in ?Syntagmatia: Essays on Neo-Latin Literature in Honour of Monique Mund-Dopchie and Gilbert Tournoy (Humanistica Lovaniensia, XXVI) 2009 Bound in 19th c. half calf and marbled boards. Illustrated with more than 160 detailed woodcuts. This is an excellent copy with large margins. A contemporary 15th or 16th c. artist has painted five of the large woodcuts with subtlety and a sophisticated use of color and shadow: 1. title page portrait of the author crowned with a laurel wreath; 2. Horace and his patron, Maecenas; 3. Julius Caesar being slain by Brutus and Cassius; 4. Virgil sailing in a ship; and 5. two pairs of lovers discoursing in a landscape. From the libraries of Georg (Franz Burkhard) Kloss (1787-1854), with his bookplate; Arthur Atherley, with his bookplate; and Etienne Reymond, with his bookplate ?Mr. & Mrs. Etienne Reymond? The German physician, philologist and Freemason George Kloss (1787-1854) was an early student of bibliographer and a collector of early books and manuscripts. This book was Lot 2046 in Kloss? sale at Sotheby?s, May 1835.) FIRST ILLUSTRATED EDITION OF HORACE and the first edition of the poet?s works to be printed in Germany. The text was edited by the poet laureate Jacob Locher, called Philomusus. The woodcuts were executed by the artist of the Grüninger Terence (November 1, 1496). Bookseller Inventory # 2614D

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Item Description: printed by William Rastell,, London:, 1530. 26.4 x 18 cm. Folio: Collation: a-z6, A-C6, D4 ?Ye use, my mayster sayth, to look so sadly whan ye mene merrily, that many tymes men doubte whyther ye speke in sporte whan ye mene good ernest.?Thomas More?s ?Dialogue? against Tyndale & Luther The Dialogue against Heresies: Thomas More?s Defense of Catholic Orthodoxy in the face of the Protestant Reformation:?In 1523 More had written the first of his controversial works, the ?Responsio ad Lutherum?, a Latin diatribe in which he answered Luther?s attack upon Henry VIII?s book on the seven sacraments? The procedure he employed for the ?Responsio? inevitably restricted the play of More?s literary abilities. For this new book, the ?Dialogue Concerning Heresies? of 1529, More found a format that gave him freer reign to treat the ?diverse matters? mentioned on the title page. Most of the major issues of the Reformation are dealt with, for More?s purpose was to give a comprehensive review of the errors to which the public would be exposed by heretical books and sermons. The attempt to stem the flow of foreign books at the ports of entry or to confiscate or burn the books that slipped through the net had failed completely. The layman could read of these ?diverse matters? and, realizing this, Bishop Cuthbert Tunstal launched a new stage of the campaign when he sent More a package of heretical books with a license to read them in preparation for his task.?(439-40)The beauty of More?s ?Dialogue?, and what sets it apart from other works of early 16th c. religious controversy, is its literary form and style. Reminiscent of More?s ?Utopia?, the ?Dialogue? between More and his interlocutor, the ?Messenger?, is an intimate, lively, and far-reaching conversation, held in More?s home so that his young visitor, who has come at the suggestion of one of More?s friends, might discuss freely what he has ?heard some men say? concerning heretical topics. The Messenger, an educated but young and still impressionable man, has come under the influence of the reformers. His ability to reason is not so finely honed that he can see the errors of the ideas that have enthralled him, so More, at the behest of his unnamed friend, attempts to steer the Messenger clear of false doctrine. By using the dialogue form, More suggests a blue print for other English families to employ in their own households when debates over heresy arise.The whole of the text is presented in the form of a letter, written after the dialogue has taken place, so that the young man may have recourse to More?s guidance when he returns to the environment in which he first encountered heretical thinkers. The book is to be an ?enchiridion?, a handbook (or dagger) used as a guide the Messenger and others like him back to orthodox belief; it is also a defensive weapon against the dangers of heretical thinking.The ?dyvers maters? of the title constitute a catalogue of the heresies put forth by Luther, Tyndale, and preachers such as Thomas Bilney, who seek to inculcate these pernicious errors in the laity, including well-educated university men such as More?s Messenger.The topics include the veneration of Saints and their images, going on pilgrimage, the central Lutheran doctrines of ?sola scriptura?, (the idea that the Bible contains all the information necessary for salvation) and ?sola fide? (justification by faith alone), predestination, and excommunication. ?The structure of the ?Dialogue? is the course of heresy itself, one digression or bypath leading to another, farther and farther from the common way.?(443)?The consequences of such heresies are set before the Messenger?s eyes in the last book of the ?Dialogue? in the horrifying picture of the Sack of Rome (1527), where the Lutheran troops negotiate ?pacts and promises of rest? without further violence before raping wives and daughters. The Sack of Rome is the final fruit of Luther?s schism, ?of whose opinions or at the least of whose works all this business began.? (445)Weighty topics indeed, yet More?s. Bookseller Inventory # 2546D

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Heywood, John (1497?-1580?)

Published by in Flete Streete By Thomas Povvell,, London: (1556)

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Item Description: in Flete Streete By Thomas Povvell,, London:, 1556. FIRST EDITION. 19 x 14.5 cm. Quarto: A-C4, A-Z4, Aa16, Bb6, Cc8, Dd12, Ee16, Ff14, Gg8, Hh-Ss4. One of the Most Sought-after Illustrated Books of English Poetry ??The Spider and the Flie? is an allegorical mock-heroic bestiary in rhyme royal by John Heywood. It was printed in 1556 but, according to Heywood?s epilogue, was begun nineteen years earlier. The time span between composition and publication may account in part for the generally acknowledged obscurities and inconsistencies of Heywood?s political and religious allegory. Heywood?s poem is nearly as long as Milton?s ?Paradise Lost?.?As in most of Heywood?s works, a modicum of plot is enlarged upon by liberal use of the medieval debate. The Fly, caught in the Spider?s web, is allowed to plead his case for clemency before the Spider, who promises to judge the plaintiff according to reason, law, custom, and conscience. This lengthy debate satirizing courts and legal procedures is made even more convoluted when the Fly appoints a butterfly and the Spider appoints an ant to act as advocates. When all legal arguments fail, the Spider and the Fly summon their allies and prepare to settle the dispute by war. The flies capture the ant and prepare to execute him, but the eloquent ant manages to win a reprieve. After the attack of the flies (against the cobweb castle) is repulsed, both sides agree to a truce, but not until an extremely long debate over how the territory (a window) is to be divided. In the midst of this controversy the Spider reopens the original litigation and decrees that the Fly must be condemned to death. Before execution can take place, however, a maid appears and threatens to kill the Spider, who then must plead for his own life. His appeal fails; the maid crushes the Spider, lectures the flies and spiders on the necessity of peace and order, and both factions depart in amity. At the conclusion of the poem the narrator urges his readers to emulate the harmony reached by the spiders and flies:?Let us here Play our parts in this part, all parts to appear / To this maid as spiders and flies to that maid. / Let our banners of obedience be display?d, / Of love the badge, of rejoicing the right root, / And of our own wealths the right and full boot.??There is little doubt that the maid of Heywood?s poem is Mary Tudor, who attempted to crush Protestantism and restore Roman Catholicism to England, and that Heywood, a devout Catholic, had to wait almost twenty years for religious developments in England to provide him with a suitable conclusion to his poem. The other principals in the poem are less easy to identify, possibly because Heywood sometimes refers to issues and personages in Henry VIII?s reign and on other occasions to events in Mary Tudor?s. In the first part of the poem the flies seem to represent the commons, the spiders the nobility and rich landowners, and the issue appears to be land enclosures (although not consistently); in the second part the flies appear to be Roman Catholics, the spiders Protestants, and the issue religious conformity. Early in the poem the Fly caught in the web could represent Sir Thomas More and the Spider Cardinal Wolsey; later the crushed Spider suggests Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, executed by the Catholics in 1556. Obscure as Heywood?s allegory is, it is nevertheless recognizable as being patently pro-Catholic, an allegation the author was at pains not to publicize until the restoration of Roman Catholicism under Mary Tudor.? (Ruoff, Crowell?s Handbook of Elizabethan & Stuart Literature) STC 13308; Grolier, Langland to Wither, 137. Pforzheimer 469; McKerrow & Ferguson 50 Bound in fine in 19th-century red morocco tooled in a cottage style, richly gilt, with red silk doublures. This is a fine, clean, and complete copy of a book rarely encountered in such condition. A small section of the upper part of the title page has been restored in pen. It is noticeable only upon close inspection. Bookseller Inventory # 3108D

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Hyginus, Caius Julius (fl. 2nd century)

Published by Erhard Ratdolt, 14 October,, Venice: (1482)

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Item Description: Erhard Ratdolt, 14 October,, Venice:, 1482. 20 x 14.6 cm. Quarto: Collation: a-f8 g10 (a1 blank, a2r dedication to M. Fabius [Quintilianus?], a3r text, g9r commendatory poem by Jacobus Sentinus, g10r poem and verse colophon by Johannes Santritter, g10v blank). 58 leaves. 31 lines. Types 3:91G (text), 7:92G (heading on a2r), 91 Gk (a few words). Title on a2r printed in red, 11-, 7-, 5- and 3-line white-on-black woodcut initials. 47 half-page woodcuts, probably designed by Johannes Santritter, of the constellation and planet figures. The First Printed Illustrations of the Constellations FIRST ILLUSTRATED EDITION of Hyginus? ?Poeticon Astronomicon?, illustrated with 47 half-page woodcuts of the constellations and the planets personified. The text is set in a pleasing Gothic. The text of Hyginus was first published in an unillustrated edition at Ferrara in 1475.The ?Poeticon Astronomicon? (more correctly, the ?Astronomica?) is an ancient Roman work on the constellations chiefly based on the work of the Greek scientist Eratosthenes (3rd c. B.C.). The work was traditionally attributed to the first century writer C. Julius Hyginus, the Director of the Palatine Library under the Emperor Augustus, but the extant text is now believed, based on stylistic analysis, to be an abridgement of Hyginus? work made in the late second century. The fact that the order of the constellations in the poem follows precisely that of Ptolemy?s ?Almagest? further strengthens the case for a second century date. A remarkable aspect of Hyginus? text is his insistence on the use of astronomical models, in particular, a celestial globe, as an aid to teaching or explaining astronomical principles and phenomena, particularly for ?discussions on the inter-relationships between the constellations and especially between the constellations and the celestial circles.?(Lippincott p.4)Like Manilius? ?Astronomicon? and Proclus? ?Sphaera? (a text that Hyginus sought to improve upon), the ?Poeticon Astronomicon? was of special interest to early astronomers ?including Copernicus- who desired accurate editions of ancient texts from which they might derive a clear understanding of the astronomical knowledge of the Romans and Greeks, thereby establishing a firm foundation upon which to undertake astronomy?s ?renewal?.One of the chief interests in Ratdolt?s edition of Hyginus lies in the illustrations of the constellations, the first such illustrations to appear in a printed book. These images derive from medieval sources such as those found in manuscripts and paintings ?though a specific source has not been identified. The figures appear in medieval European costume and, in the words of Redgrave, ?There is a vigour and quaintness about these woodcuts which merit recognition.? Hyginus gives detailed accounts of the myths associated with each of the constellations, and these myths served as source material for artists in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, one of the most famous examples of the text?s influence being the splendid ceiling painted around 1511 by Peruzzi for Agostino Chigi in the Sala di Galatea of the Villa Farnesina (See Förster, Farnesina-Studien 1880, p. 40). In many instances these medieval European, often mythological, constellation figures differed notably from those used by Ptolemy and his Islamic successors . Several stylistic conventions, first published in Ratdolt's woodcuts, endured for several centuries, both in the numerous editions of Hyginus and in the various maps derived therefrom.The Contents of Hyginus? ?Poeticon Astronomicon?Hyginus tells us that he intends to give a better description of the celestial sphere than Aratus had done in his ?De Sphaera? Book I gives a brief overview of the cosmography of the universe, the celestial sphere, the Earth and its zones, and the Zodiac. Book II is a compendium of myths related to the constellations, the five planets (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter) as well as the Sun, Moon, and Milky Way.Book III is Hyginus? star catalogue. It is in this book that Ratdol. Bookseller Inventory # 2526D

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Berenger of Landorra, Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela (circa 1262-1330), and Gregory of Vorau (ed. Matthias Farinator)

Published by Printer of the 1481 Legenda aurea, 22 March, Strasbourg: (1482)

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Item Description: Printer of the 1481 Legenda aurea, 22 March, Strasbourg:, 1482. FOURTH EDITION (first printed in 1477).. 29.2 x 21.8 cm. Folio: 274 unsigned leaves. [A-C]8, [D]10; [a-m]8, [n]6,[o-z]8, [aa-ff]8, [gg]10. Complete with the initial and final blanks. The Natural World & The Human Soul The arrival of printed books is so often regarded as one of the inaugural moments of the renaissance that it is sometimes forgotten that the first years of print also represented the last great flowering of the Middle Ages. The ?Lumen Anime? (Light of the Soul), is testament to that. Formerly attributed to the Carmelite friar Mathias Farinator of Vienna (who compiled the index), the ?Lumen Anime? is now known to be Berenger of Landorra, General of the Dominican order and archbishop of Campostella from 1317 to 1325.The ?Lumen Anime? is a sprawling manual of natural and moral philosophy, that gathers together quotations on relevant themes from authors as diverse as Aristotle, Theophrastus, the elder Pliny, Ptolemy, Solinus, Ambrose, Augustine, Jerome, Isidore, Hugh of St Victor, and Avicenna. It is broadly organized in three parts beginning with the birth of Christ and other theological material before going on to such worldly matters as abstinence, abjection, adulation, wealth, guilt, love, humility, health, silence, and pride. It then proceeds to the two longer parts: the first, concerned with the natural world of plants, animals and trees; and the second, in more depth with problems of a moral and philosophical kind. It was immensely popular in the fifteenth century as a reference work, and despite its Dominican origins, found its natural home and use in the Benedictine orders of Central Europe.?The natural historical content [of the ?Lumen Anime?] centers as much on astronomy and meteorology as on flora and fauna; it includes a huge number of largely inauthentic citations of frequently exotic-sounding authors and the vast majority of its exempla have a a tripartite structure ? a scientific (or pseudo-scientific ?proprietas? is followed by a moralizing interpretation, whose lesson is then reinforced by a quotation from a theological authority.? In the version of the text edited by Matthias Farinator, which is the basis of the printed editions, ?chapters tend to be much longer [and] the initial natural historical ?proprietas? is often longer and supported by a series of quotations, its components are then analyzed allegorically, and a moralization follows.?(Nigel Harris, ?the Light of the Soul?, 2007)The textual history and authorship of the ?Lumen Anime? are matters of considerable complexity. There are some 195 surviving manuscripts and fragments, as well as four fifteenth and one sixteenth-century printed editions. Of the 195 manuscripts, 35 date from the fourteenth century and the remainder from the fifteenth century, including two that derive from the printed editions.Mary and Richard Rouse have established three principal lines of transmission. ?Lumen A? is the original version as composed by Berenger of Landorra, Archbishop of Compostella between 1317 and his death in 1330. It would appear that the collection took shape with the encouragement and support of Pope John XXII. It is the book?s Spanish origin that explains the presence of both Arabic and Greek material in the collections.By 1332, a copy of the manuscript had reached Austria, where it was revised, modified and expanded by an otherwise unknown monk, Gregory of Vorau. ?Lumen B? is the source of the text that was edited by Matthias Farinator, and printed by Anton Sorg at Augsburg in 1477, and then reprinted again at Augsburg by Gunther Zainer in 1477, at Reutlingen in 1479, and in 1482 at Strasbourg. The Rouses have proposed that Farinator?s manuscript was a direct copy of the complete text of either Vorau 130 or Klosterneuberg 384 (p.51), the earliest surviving witnesses to the B tradition.A third manuscript recension, ?Lumen C?, derives from a compilation of material primarily from the A, but also from the B text. This line of descent dates before 1357. As well as these principal traditions, other manu. Bookseller Inventory # 2823D

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Brant, Sebastian (1458-1521); Barclay, Alexander (1475?-1552) and Locher, Jacob (1471-1528), translators

Published by in Paules Churchyarde by John Cawood printer to the Queenes Maiestie,, London: (1570)

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Item Description: in Paules Churchyarde by John Cawood printer to the Queenes Maiestie,, London:, 1570. SECOND EDITION (first printed in 1509).. 28.2 x 19.5 cm. Folio: 6, 6, A-Z6, Aa-Uu6, Xx4, A-G6, A-D6. [12], 259, [3]; [42]; [24] leaves The English ?Ship of Fooles?, Illustrated with 116 Large Woodcuts?A Truly English Poem? Sebastian Brant's celebrated ?Ship of Fooles? ("Narrenschiff"), here in the English translation of Alexander Barclay, printed together with the Latin version of the poem by Jacob Locher. The first edition of Barclay?s translation (1509) is unobtainable. In this second edition there are also additional works by Barclay, ?The Mirrour of good Maners? and ?Certayne Eglogues", which did not appear in the 1509 edition. "The present edition is of considerable interest and value because of the 'Eclogues' appended, the original editions of which are exceedingly rare." (Pforzheimer)Brant first published his "Narrenschiff", in German, in 1494 at Basel; a second, enlarged German edition appeared the following year and this served as the basis for Jacob Locher's Latin translation, "Stultifera Naus? of 1497. In producing his English "Ship of Fooles", Barclay worked from Locher's Latin translation and the French paraphrase of Pierre Riviere. However, Barclay's "Ship of Fooles" is no mere translation; the English "Ship" is four times as long as Locher's Latin version. The result is a truly English poem, reflective of the life and culture of early 16th century England."The year of the accession of Henry VIII was the meeting-point in England of three periods of literature. The Middle Ages were passing away. The new Italian Renaissance gave its first literary product to England when Erasmus wrote his Praise of Folly, which owes its very name to the fact that it was written under the hospitable roof of Sir Thomas More in 1509. And in between there is that curious Interregnum, known as the Early Renaissance, initiated by the Council of Basel and Aeneas Sylvius in Germany; by strange coincidence it was just in 1509 that its chief literary production, the 'Ship of Fooles', was translated into English?."Barclay's 'Ship of Fooles' is not only important as a picture of the English life and popular feeling of his time, it is, both in style and vocabulary, a most valuable and remarkable monument of the English language? In the long, barren tract between Chaucer and Spenser, the 'Ship of Fooles' stands all but alone as a popular poem, and the continuance of this popularity for a century and more is no doubt to be attributed as much to the use of the language of the 'coming time' as to the popularity of the subject. As a graphic and comprehensive picture of the social condition of pre-Reformation England, as an important influence in the formation of our modern English tongue, and as a rich and unique exhibition of early art this medieval picture-poem is of unrivalled interest." (T.H. Jamieson) STC 3546; Pforzheimer 41; Langland to Wither, 18; Wilhelmi, Sébastian Brant (Bibliography) 218; Brant ("500e anniversaire" Exhibition catalogue, Basle 1994), 109 Bound in seventeenth-century English calfskin, corners bumped, upper hinge starting. A very fine copy, bright and crisp. The first two signatures have a short wormtrail in the blank lower margin, quickly diminishing to a single, tiny pinprick. There is another short trail in the blank margin of the same leaves, far from the text. Aside from this and the occasional small stain, excellent. Provenance: With the seventeenth-century manuscript signature of Lyonel Tollemache and the Helmingham Hall Library stamp on the blank upper corner of the title page."There are 116 woodcuts in the text of which 8 are repeated twice and 1 once. These illustrations are from the blocks cut for Pynson's edition, 1509, and, with the exception of two or three are very well preserved. These blocks were not copied directly from the original Basel blocks (1494) but from the Parisian copies made for the French translation of Pierre Riviere."(Pforzheimer) The Latin text is set in Roman type while the English text is in black letter. The title page has the well-known woodcu. Bookseller Inventory # 3095D

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Tyndale, William (ca. 1494-1536), Frith, John (1503-1533); Barnes, Robert (1495-1540)

Published by Printed by John Daye, and are to be sold at his Shop ? An. 1572, London: (1573)

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Item Description: Printed by John Daye, and are to be sold at his Shop ? An. 1572, London:, 1573. FIRST EDITION.. Folio: pp. [14], 478, [18, index], [4], 3-172, [4, index], [8], 183-376, [4]. A4, B4(-B4) C-Y4 Aa-Yy6 AA-BB6 CC6(±CC3) DD-EE6, FF-GG4 HH6(-HH1) II-XX6 YY4 *3A4 3A6(-3A1) 3B-3Q6 3R4. Complete. The Works of William Tyndale: The Most Important Figure of the Early English Reformation First edition, edited by John Foxe, of the works of Tyndale, Frith, and Barnes, with brief lives drawn from his Book of Martyrs. The works of Tyndale, translator of the Bible into English, occupy the better part of the volume. ?We have great cause to geeve thankes to the high providence of the almighty God, for the excellent arte of Printing, most happely of late found out, and now commonly practised every where, to the singular benefite of Christes Church ? Wherfore such Printers in my mynde, are not to be defrauded of their due commendation, who in pretermitting other light triflyng pamflets of matter unneedful, and impertinent, little serving to purpose, lesse to necessitie, doe employe their endeavour and workemanship chiefly to restore such fruitfull workes and monumentes of auncient writers, and blessed Martyrs: who as by theiry godly lyfe, and constant death, gave testimonie to the trueth ?? (Preface). In the second edition of his Actes and Monuments (1570), Foxe had promised his readers an edition of the works of Tyndale, Frith and Barnes. His aims were twofold, apologetic and pastoral ? to demonstrate the logic of embracing the gospel, and to offer spiritual guidance: ?Briefly, whatsoever thou art, if thou be yong, of John Frith: if thou be in middle age, of W. Tyndall: if in elder years of D. Barnes, matter is here to be founde, not onely of doctrine to enforme thee, of comfort to delyte thee, of godly ensample to directe thee: but also of special admiration, to make thee to wonder at the workes of the Lord? (?Epistle or Preface?). Tyndale?s works fittingly head and dominate the volume; they were first collected here and were not reprinted until the nineteenth century. The introductory biographies by Foxe largely taken from the Actes but with some new additions (such as the ?few notes touching [Tyndale?s] private behaviour in diet, study [etc.]?); the first two woodcuts, of the martyrdoms of Tyndale and Barnes, were also taken from the Actes, but the last, an allegorical ?lively picture describyng the authoritie and substance of Gods most blessed word, weyghing agaynst Popish traditions?, appears for the first time here. ?Tyndale was in the vanguard of the popular English Reformation. His books, especially The Wicked Mammon, The Obedience, and his expositions of Romans, gathered to a head the widespread revulsion at the corruptions and superstitions of the church as it then was, all of which are clearly described. Scripture had to be the base for these judgements, and it was spelt out with clarity and excellent scholarship, from the original languages. From the great release that justification by faith brings to the sinner, Tyndale showed, always in the language of the New Testament, that central to a Christian's life were not curious rituals and practices, but the promises of God. He was passionate in his wish that England could be a Christian state under a Christian prince, free from the intrusions of a totally alien system stemming from the bishop of Rome.?The great change that came over England from 1526, the ability of every ordinary man, woman, and child to read and hear the whole New Testament in English, accurately rendered, was Tyndale's work, and its importance cannot be overstressed. The Vulgate was incomprehensible to the ploughboy and most of his familiars throughout the land. Now all four gospels could be read, often aloud, in their entirety, and the whole of Paul. A useful definition of the popular reformation is ?people reading Paul? There is no shortage of evidence of the gatherings of people of all ages, all over the country, to read and hear these English scriptures?and reading meant, so often, reading aloud.?Tyndale as th. Bookseller Inventory # 3025D

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Sacrobosco, Johannes de (ca. 1195 ? ca. 1256 A.D.); Regiomontanus, Johannes (1436-1476); Peurbach, Georg von (1423-1461)

Published by Erhard Ratdolt, 6 July, Venice: (1482)

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Item Description: Erhard Ratdolt, 6 July, Venice:, 1482. FIRST COLLECTED EDITION.. 19.5 x 14.3 cm. Quarto: 60 lvs. Collation: a-g8, h4. 30-31 lines, Gothic type Renaissance Science and its Medieval Antecedents A fine copy of Erhard Ratdolt?s beautiful printing of Sacrobosco?s ?Sphere?, the core astronomical textbook from the Middle Ages to the early 16th century. This edition is the first to include key texts by two of the most influential 15th c. astronomers: Johannes Regiomontanus and Georg Peurbach. Working in the vein of the Renaissance humanists, Peurbach and his student Regiomontanus sought out the extant scientific writings of antiquity, the classical foundations of medieval European and Arabic science. Both men gleaned what they could from ancient authorities but more importantly, moved the science forward, adjusting, correcting, and often discrediting their ancient and medieval predecessors, while performing new scientific investigations of astronomical phenomena. These investigations led to important innovations, placing Renaissance astronomy on a new path.The first of the two supplemental texts in this volume, Peurbach?s ?Theoricae Novae Planetarum? (New Theories of the Planets), eventually came to replace Sacrobosco?s ?Sphere? and another 13th c. text, the ?Theorica planetarum communis? (Universal Theory of the Planets), attributed to Gerard of Cremona. Composed about 1454, Peurbach based his ?Theoricae? on the familiar teachings of Ptolemy, Al-Battani, Al-Farghani and caliph Al-Mammun?s astronomer, whose name is unknown. The word ?novae? in the title is not meant to refer to a completely new theory but only to emphasize that this work is a compilation of the latest contemporary scientific knowledge. ?Following Arab astronomers, Peurbach added trepidation to Ptolemy's six motions of the celestial spheres and substituted solid crystal spheres for the hypothetical circles employed in Ptolemy's ?Almagest?.? (Stillwell, Awakenings).In the final text in this volume, ?Disputationes contra Cremonensia deliramenta? (Arguments against the Errors of [Gerard of] Cremona), Peurbach?s student Regiomontanus offers a critique of Gerard?s aforementioned ?Theorica?, and demonstrates the superiority of Peurbach?s ?Theoricae novae.? Adopting the form of a dialogue between ?Viennensis? (the ?man from Vienna?, representing Regiomontanus) and ?Cracoviensis? (?The one from Krakow?, representing Martin Bylica of Ilkusch), Regiomontanus used geometrical proofs, often supplemented by diagrams, to refute specific claims in the earlier ?Theorica.? In the course of his critique, Regiomontanus -renowned for the accuracy of his own predictive tables and calendars- also makes corrections to Gerard?s planetary tables.Sacrobosco?s ?Sphere?:?Sacrobosco?s fame rests firmly on his ?De Sphaera?, a work based on Ptolemy and his Arabic commentators, published about 1220 and antedating the ?Sphaera? of Grosseteste. It was quite generally adopted as the fundamental astronomy text, for often it was so clear that it needed little or no explanation. It was first used at the University of Paris. There are four chapters to the work. Chapter one defines a sphere, explains its divisions, including the four elements, and also comments on the heavens and their movements. The revolutions of the heavens are from east to west and their shape is spherical. The earth is a sphere, acting as the middle (or center) of the firmament; it is a mere point in relation to the total firmament and is immobile. Its measurements are also included. Chapter two treats the various circles and their names- the celestial circle, the equinoctial, the movement of the ?primum mobile? with its two parts, the north and south poles, the zodiac, the ecliptic, the colures, the meridian and the horizon, and the Arctic and Antarctic circles. It closes with an explanation of the five zones. Chapter three explains the cosmic, chronic, and heliacal risings and settings of the signs and also their right and oblique ascensions. Explanations are furnished for the variations in the length of days in d. Bookseller Inventory # 2885D

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Item Description: Mathias Apiarius (Biener) for Johann Petreius,, Bern:, 1545. 21 x 16.5 cm. Quarto: I. [16], 302, [2] p. aa-bb4, a-z4, A-P4. II. [127] p. A-Q4 The Main Chemical Textbooks of Medieval EuropeWith the Oldest Known Bookplate of a German Pharmacist I. ?Alchemiae Libri? (1545) Second edition of this extremely important and early collection of alchemical writings. The identity of Geber with the eighth-century alchemist Jabir ibn Hayyan is still a matter of dispute. ?Even on the slender basis of our present knowledge, Jabir appears already as a very great personality, one of the greatest in mediaeval science.??Sarton, I, p. 532. Certainly, De Alchimia and the other works of the Geber corpus were of the greatest influence on Western chemistry, and ?whether they be translations or elaborations, they represent the amount of Arabic chemical knowledge made available to Latin reading people toward the end of the thirteenth century?they represent the best Latin knowledge on chemistry in that period.??Sarton, II, p. 1044. The present collection contains four treatises by Geber/Jabir ibn Hayyan: 1. Summa perfectionis. 2. Liber de investigatione perfectionis (the earliest description of the preparation of nitric acid and aqua regia). 3. Liber de inventione veritatis sive perfectionis. 4. Liber fornacum (a practical text on chemical operations). ?We find in them remarkably sound views on methods of chemical research; a theory on the geologic formation of metals; the so-called sulphur-mercury theory of metals (the six metals differ essentially because of different proportions of sulphur and mercury in them); preparation of various substances (e.g., basic lead carbonate; arsenic and antimony from their sulphides). Jabir deals also with various applications, e.g., refinement of metals, preparation of steel, dyeing of cloth and leather, varnishes to water-proof cloth and protect iron, use of manganese dioxide in glass-making, use of iron pyrites for writing in gold, distillation of vinegar to concentrate acetic acid. He observed the imponderability of magnetic force.??Sarton, I, p. 532. This collection also contains the following texts of which at least four are printed for the first time: 5. Roger Bacon?s Speculum Alchemiae. 6. Richard of Wendover?s Correctorium Alchemiae. 7. Rosarius minor, de Alchemia by an unknown author. 8. Khalid ibn Yazid?s Liber Secretorum Alchemiae. 9. Hermes Trismegistus? Tabula Smaragdina. 10. Hortolanus? commentary on the Tabula Smaragdina.A contemporary note in a copy of the 1545 ed. once offered for sale by E.P. Goldschimdt (Cat. 165, item 19) stated that the manuscript used by the printer Petri for this edition came from the library of Conrad Gesner. D.S.B., VII, p. 42?His ?importance for the history not only of alchemy but also of science in general, and for the intellectual history of Islam, has by no means been sufficiently examined??(& see the full article for more on his individual writings). Duveen, p. 11??one of the most valuable early collections of texts.? Ferguson, I, p. 301?(not in Young collection). Darmstaedter used this edition to prepare his Die Alchemie des Geber (1922).II. ?De Alchemia Dialogi II? (1548)This is the first combined edition of these two texts, both translated from the Italian by Guglielmo Grataroli. The prefatory "propositiones" are headed: ?Expositio librorum Gebri et Raimundi [Lulli]? The first dialogue, written by the Brescian Giovanni Braccesco, ?Dialogus primus, veram et genuinam librorum Gebri sententiam explicans, Demogorgon Geber? (p. [11-112]) was first published in Venice in 1544 under title ?La Espositione di Geber Philosopho? The second work, ?Lignum Vitae, Demogorgon Rymundus? (p. [113-127]) was first published in Rome in 1542 under title: "Il legno della vità? Although various components of these works are ascribed to Raymond Llull, ?The ascription is improbable." (Mellon)?The printer, Petreius, in a note to the reader, alludes to his recent editions of Geber and Llull, whose hidden secrets these dialogues will now disclose? The leading idea of Bra. Bookseller Inventory # 3054D

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Spenser, Edmund (ca.1552-1599)

Published by Imprinted by Thomas Orwin for VVilliam Ponsonbie, dwelling in Paules Churchyard at the signe of the Bishops head,, London: (1591)

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Item Description: Imprinted by Thomas Orwin for VVilliam Ponsonbie, dwelling in Paules Churchyard at the signe of the Bishops head,, London:, 1591. FIRST EDITION.. 18.5 x 14 cm. Quarto: [184] p. Collation: A-Z4 (lacking final blank Z4) The First Edition of Spenser?s Complaints. The Sole 16th Century Edition The contents are as follows: 1. The Ruines of Time. 2. The Teares of the Muses. 3. Virgils Gnat. 4. Prosopopoia, or Mother Hubberds Tale. 5. The Ruines of Rome: by Bellay. 6. Muiopotmos, or The Tale of the Butterflie. 7. Visions of the Worlds vanitie. 8. Bellayes visions. 9. Petrarches visions.?Of the nine poems in the volume, four are sonnet sequences while the others are in rhyme royal, ottava rima, sixaines, or couplets. Each appears with a separate title page: five are dedicated to prominent courtiers or patrons and four are printed with no dedication. The first, ?The Ruines of Time,? is a lament on the destruction of the Roman city of Verulamium followed by an elegy on the deaths of Robert Dudley, the earl of Leicester, and Sir Philip Sidney. It is followed by ?The Teares of the Muses,? a series of nine laments that deplore the corruption of learning and poetry. ?Virgil?s Gnat,? the tale of a shepherd?s rescue by a humble gnat, is an elaborate mock-heroic complaint translated from the pseudo-Virgilian ?Culex.? Next, ?Prosopoia, or Mother Hubberds Tale? takes the form of an allegorical beast-fable; its satire, generally assumed to have been directed against Lord Burleigh, was probably the reason that ?Complaints? was recalled shortly after its publication and that the poem was subsequently omitted from the 1611 folio of Spenser?s works (see the following item.) The volume continues with ?The Ruines of Rome,? a translation of Joachim Du Bellay?s lament on the corruption of the modern city, and ?Muiopotmos,? a mock-heroic fable of the entrapment of a butterfly by a spider. The three sonnet sequences, two of which are translations, conclude the volume: ?Visions of the Worlds Vanitite?, ?The Visions of Bellay,? and ?The Visions of Petrarch.? For a thorough analysis, see Katharine A. Craik, Spenser's "Complaints" and the New Poet, in Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 1/2 (2001), pp. 63-79. Johnson, A Critical Bibliography of the Works of Edmund Spenser printed before 1700, No. 14; STC (2nd ed.), 23078; Pforzheimer, 968 Bound in fine early 20th c. green morocco with gilt turn-ins and the words ?Complaints ? Edmund Spenser ? 1591? tooled in gold on the front board. The same neatly tooled on the spine. A nice copy, never washed or pressed, with wide outer margins. The edge of the title is a little frayed, far from the woodcut, there are light damp-stains in signatures D and S and a very faint one in the final signature. A few other trivial stains. It is highly unusual to find Spenser quartos in such condition, the majority of the surviving copies having been washed and trimmed. Fortunately, the binder of this copy resisted that temptation. The general title has a fine woodcut border with figures of David and Moses. There are separate title pages, using the same woodcut border, for ?The Teares of the Muses?, ?Prosopopoia. Or Mother Hubberds Tale?, and ?Mviopotmos. Or The Fate of the Butterflie? There are also a few attractive woodcut head-pieces and initials. Bookseller Inventory # 3119D

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Piranesi, Giovanni Battista (1720-1778)

Published by Si vende dall' Autore dirimpetta l'Academia di Franzia,, Rome: (1748)

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Item Description: Si vende dall' Autore dirimpetta l'Academia di Franzia,, Rome:, 1748. FIRST EDITION.. 53.2 x 38.7 cm. Folio: Etched throughout, 2 titles, dedication leaf, 2 other preliminary leaves, 25 plates, with plate numbered I corrected by hand as usual, and including the final unnumbered Arco di Galieno plate, plates numbered 13 and 14 after Silvestre. The Duke of Portland - Feltrinelli Copy Provenance: William Henry, 3rd Duke of Portland (1738-1809) Prime Minister of Great Britain and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (binding); by descent to William Arthur, 6th Duke of Portland (1857-1943) British Conservative politician (armorial bookplate, binding); Giannalisa Feltrinelli (blind stamp on flyleaf, her sale, Christie?s London, 3 December 1997, lot 334).A fine copy with wide margins of Piranesi's etchings of the antiquities of Rome and of monuments outside Rome, preceding his similarly named magnum opus. Piranesi's archaeological interests are evident not only in the historical accuracy of the views, but in the 2 plates recording inscriptions on monuments which precede the views. The work was published at Piranesi?s first Rome address, on the Corso across from the French Academy (i.e. Palazzo Salviati.)?Amongst his purest etchings in their early state before rework? In most? Piranesi is already using double biting to add variety and depth to his light and shade. From the purely artistic side there is scarcely anything more attractive in Piranesi?s work than this early series.?(Hind)?These exquisite plates, based on sketches made during Piranesi?s travels in Italy, c.1743-47, and subdivided into "Part I: Ruins outside Rome" and "Part II: Ruins within Rome?, may be considered among the artist?s graphic masterpieces. They possess a unity and range of experiment lacking in the Varie Vedute and even in the early plates of the larger Vedute di Roma, which probably overlap this series in time? The ?Archi trionfali? show strong evidence of Tiepolo's decisive influence on Piranesi during the latter's return visit to Venice in the mid-1740's, together with the first signs of certain compositional ideas which were to be transferred to the larger Vedute in the next decade.?(Wilton-Ely, t. I, p. 144). Hind p.75; Foucillon pp. 287-290 Bound in contemporary mottled calf gilt, coroneted 'P' of the dukes of Portland at center of boards. The binding neatly rebacked (preserving the lettering piece), and with a few discreet repairs, and light wear. The contents are in excellent condition with broad margins, with only occasional light spotting.Provenance: William Henry, 3rd Duke of Portland (1738-1809) Prime Minister of Great Britain and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (binding); by descent to William Arthur, 6th Duke of Portland (1857-1943) British Conservative politician (armorial bookplate, binding); Giannalisa Feltrinelli (blind stamp on flyleaf, her sale, Christie?s London, 3 December 1997, lot 334). Bookseller Inventory # 3197D

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Marinoni, Giovanni Giacomo de (1676-1755)

Published by Leopold J. Kaliwoda,, Vienna: (1745)

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Item Description: Leopold J. Kaliwoda,, Vienna:, 1745. FIRST EDITION.. 36.6 x 25.4 cm. Folio: [12] ff., 210 pp., [1] f. Collation: [a]2, b-d2, )(2, )()(2, A-Z2, Aa-Zz2, Aaa-Iii2. Including an engraved frontispiece signed Sedlmayr after Bertoli and a title printed in red and black. The text is illustrated with 17 half- to full-page engravings and 43 added engraved folding plates. Complete. An Extraordinary Copy of "One of the Most Exquisitely Illustrated Astronomical Works Ever Printed? -Kenney First edition of this lavishly illustrated description of Marinoni's astronomical observatory in Vienna and its instruments, including the astronomer's numerous telescopes, the (fixed) mural quadrant, the quadrant "ampliatus" and the position micrometer, with its screws, indices and two-lens telescope. One of Marinoni's micrometers, a gift to Eustachio Manfredi, the first Director of the Bologna Observatory, was used by the Bolognese astronomers to observe the transit of Venus in 1761. The various instruments are described in detail along with their actual positions in the building, so that the reader has an exact idea of how an XVIIIth-century observatory was arranged. These same instruments were later used by the Jesuit astronomer Maximillian Hell at the astronomical observatory of the University of Vienna. Thus, this work provides us with a detailed knowledge of the equipment of the first two Viennese observatories."Marinoni was born in Udine, Italy (the Austrian border area) and studied in Vienna. He was appointed Imperial Court Mathematician and in 1726 became director of the Academy of Geometry and Military Science. He visited Bologna and later Paris to see astronomical instruments in use there before designing and building his observatory in Vienna." (Kenney)The observatory, which Marinoni had discussed with Leibnitz as early as 1714, was completed in 1733. Marinoni?s was the first astronomical observatory established in Vienna. Like his great predecessors Tycho Brahe and Jan Hevelius, Marinoni designed his home observatory himself, and constructed many of the instruments used therein. However, Marinoni also imported instruments from Pavia, Venice, Milan (from Pietro Patroni), and London (from the optician and telescope maker Edward Scarlet).The ?De Astronomica Specula Domestica et Organico Apparatu Astronomico? was to the 18th century what Tycho Brahe?s ?Mechanica? was to the 16th and Hevelius? ?Machina Coelestis? to the 17th. All three works provided their contemporary audiences with painstakingly detailed descriptions and depictions of state-of-the art astronomical instruments and the observatories constructed for their use. As a record of the state of astronomical technology in the mid-18th century, Marinoni?s work is a work without equal.After his death in 1755, Marinoni?s instruments became the property of the Austrian Empress Maria Theresia (reg. 1740-1780), who used them to equip the newly established astronomical observatory at the University of Vienna. Marinoni?s own house was deemed to far from the university, so it was decided to construct a four-storey tower and to move the instruments there.The Jesuit astronomer and mathematician Maximilian Hell was appointed as the first director of the observatory and was charged with overseeing its construction and the installation of the instruments. It was from the new observatory, using Marinoni?s instruments, that Hell made his observations for his annual ephemerides and observed the transit of Venus in 1761, using Marinoni?s micrometer and the Newtonian telescope that Marinoni had bought from Edward Scarlet.Hell?s astronomical work brought him to the attention of King Christian VII of Denmark and Norway, who invited him to mount an expedition to observe the 1769 transit of Venus from Vardö. Upon returning to Vienna, Hell sought to derive the sun?s parallax from his observations of the two Venus transits.Even after the suppression of the Jesuits in 1773, Hell continued in his post as director of the university observatory, ably assisted by his colleagues Anton P. Bookseller Inventory # 2336D

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Luther, Martin (1483-1546); Sachs, Hans (1494-1576), attributed author; Hans Sebald Beham(1500-1550), artist

Published by Hans Guldenmund,, Nuremberg: (1526)

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Item Description: Hans Guldenmund,, Nuremberg:, 1526. FIRST NUREMBERG EDITION.. 20.5 x 16 cm. Quarto: [44] pp. A-E4, F2 One of the Greatest Woodcut Books of the Reformation One of the greatest ?and scarcest- illustrated books of the German Protestant Reformation, illustrated with 74 fine woodcuts by the famed painter and engraver Hans Sebald Beham (1500-1550). Beham executed these woodcuts a short time before he was banished from Nuremberg, having been accused of heresy, blasphemy, and refusing to recognize the authority of the City council. The religious orders represented include the Dominicans (Predigers), Franciscans (Barfussers), Augustinians, the Brothers of Our Lady, etc.This is an anti-papal satire on the Roman Catholic Church and its various religious orders. The book consists of seventy-four fine woodcuts of the pope, cardinals, clerical dignitaries, and members of the sixty-four monastic orders all in contemporary color, with satirical verses ?attribute to Hans Sachs- beneath each figure. The poems criticize the Church and its hierarchy for obscuring the clear message of the Gospel through the proliferation of countless religious groups distinguished only by their costumes and minor doctrinal distinctions. In addition to its importance in the history of Reformation satire, the book is an invaluable visual record of the religious orders. The book includes a forward and postscript in verse, which are based on Luther?s prose versions in the Wittenberg edition. (cf. Smith, Nuremberg, a Renaissance City, 1500-1618) Benzing 2236; VD 16, P 363; Kuczinski 173; Pauli, Beham 1124-1180 Bound in later stiff vellum. All 74 woodcuts colored by a contemporary hand. Some light soiling. Complete. Bookseller Inventory # 3042D

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Item Description: printed by William Stansby for the author,, London:, 1611. FIRST EDITION.. 20.5 x 15.5 cm. Quarto: ?1 (engraved title page), ?1 (printed title), a3, b4, ?1(woodcut arms), a4-8, b8, c-g8, h-l4, B-C8, D1, (+D1-3), D2-8, E-Z8; Aa-Zz8; Aaa-Ccc8, Ddd4, [Eee]1, signed "Eee3", [Fff]1 (unsigned). First Edition of Coryate?s Bizarre Travelogue. A Fascinating Account of An Adenturer in Europe Provenance: Thomas Abdy (first Baronet, 1612-1686, signature on front flyleaf dated 6 December 1677, with further signatures of Christopher & Anthony Abdy) ? Arthur M. Brown (gilt-stamped leather bookplate) ? William J.K. Vanston (Parke-Bernet, 24 February 1959, lot 145).First edition of one of the earliest travelogues in English, written by Thomas Coryate (1577-1617), one of the great English eccentrics and travellers. ?Coryate joined the household of Henry, Prince of Wales. Driven by curiosity he sailed from Dover in 1608 and arrived soon in Paris, 'which he found even filthier and smellier than London. At Fontainebleau he was befriended by members of Henri IV's garde écossaise and saw more of the royal household than would normally have been permitted to chance visitors. He journeyed on to Lyons, through Savoy to Turin, Milan, Mantua, and Padua. His description of how Italians shielded themselves from the sun resulted in apparently the first mention of "umbrella" in English literature. Table forks, almost unknown in England, were in general use in Italy; Coryate acquired one, imitated the Italian fashion of eating and continued to do so frequently when he came home . Arriving in Venice on 24 June 1608 Coryate presented two letters of introduction to the English ambassador, Sir Henry Wotton, who, perhaps impressed by the letter which mentioned that Coryate was remotely related to the earl of Essex, did him many kindnesses. These included rescuing him in the ambassadorial gondola from a threatening crowd of Jews who objected to Coryate preaching Christianity to their rabbi. Later he was to risk reprisals for antipathy to Roman Catholic rites and, during his Eastern travels, for proclaiming against Islam. After six weeks of intensive quest and recording of information, he left Venice on 7 August by boat to Padua, then walked to Vicenza, Verona, and Bergamo. Coryate arrived in Zürich by boat and reached Basel on foot at the end of August. While in Switzerland he heard the story of William Tell. Coryate's admirable rendering appears to be the earliest in English. Arriving in Strasbourg by boat he then got lost, alone and on foot, in the Black Forest, but the sole threat of armed violence experienced in Europe was from a German peasant, who resented Coryate picking grapes from a vineyard. He was hospitably received in Heidelberg and walked to Mainz. After a detour to visit Frankfurt's fair he sailed down the Rhine, with a brief stop at Cologne, and continued by water down what was the temporary truce line between the armies of Spain and the United Provinces. After calling on the English merchants established at Middelburg he was entertained by the English garrison at Flushing. Thence he embarked on 1 October and landed in London on 3 October 1608. With the rector's permission Coryate hung his shoes in Odcombe church. Coryate drew on his experiences in writing Coryats Crudities (1611), which was intended to encourage courtiers and gallants to enrich their minds by continental travel. It contains illustrations, historical data, architectural descriptions, local customs, prices, exchange rates, and food and drink, but is too diffuse and bulky - there are 864 pages in the 1905 edition - to become a vade-mecum. To solicit "panegyric verses" Coryate circulated copies of the title-page depicting his adventures and his portrait, which had been engraved by William Hole and which he considered a good likeness. About sixty contributors include many illustrious authors, not all in verse, some insulting, some pseudonymous. Prince Henry accepted the dedication but insisted that all were published' (Oxford DNB). "There probably has never been another such. Bookseller Inventory # 3099D

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Item Description: printed by William Stansby for the author,, London:, 1611. FIRST EDITION.. 20.5 x 15.5 cm. Quarto: ?1 (engraved title page), ?1 (printed title), a3, b4, ?1(woodcut arms), a4-8, b8, c-g8, h-l4, B-C8, D1, (+D1-3), D2-8, E-Z8; Aa-Zz8; Aaa-Ccc8, Ddd4, [Eee]1, signed "Eee3", [Fff]1 (unsigned). First Edition of Coryate?s Bizarre Travelogue. A Fascinating Account of An Adventurer in Europe First edition of one of the earliest travelogues in English, written by Thomas Coryate (1577-1617), one of the great English eccentrics and travellers. ?Coryate joined the household of Henry, Prince of Wales. Driven by curiosity he sailed from Dover in 1608 and arrived soon in Paris, 'which he found even filthier and smellier than London. At Fontainebleau he was befriended by members of Henri IV's garde écossaise and saw more of the royal household than would normally have been permitted to chance visitors. He journeyed on to Lyons, through Savoy to Turin, Milan, Mantua, and Padua. His description of how Italians shielded themselves from the sun resulted in apparently the first mention of "umbrella" in English literature. Table forks, almost unknown in England, were in general use in Italy; Coryate acquired one, imitated the Italian fashion of eating and continued to do so frequently when he came home . Arriving in Venice on 24 June 1608 Coryate presented two letters of introduction to the English ambassador, Sir Henry Wotton, who, perhaps impressed by the letter which mentioned that Coryate was remotely related to the earl of Essex, did him many kindnesses. These included rescuing him in the ambassadorial gondola from a threatening crowd of Jews who objected to Coryate preaching Christianity to their rabbi. Later he was to risk reprisals for antipathy to Roman Catholic rites and, during his Eastern travels, for proclaiming against Islam. After six weeks of intensive quest and recording of information, he left Venice on 7 August by boat to Padua, then walked to Vicenza, Verona, and Bergamo. Coryate arrived in Zürich by boat and reached Basel on foot at the end of August. While in Switzerland he heard the story of William Tell. Coryate's admirable rendering appears to be the earliest in English. Arriving in Strasbourg by boat he then got lost, alone and on foot, in the Black Forest, but the sole threat of armed violence experienced in Europe was from a German peasant, who resented Coryate picking grapes from a vineyard. He was hospitably received in Heidelberg and walked to Mainz. After a detour to visit Frankfurt's fair he sailed down the Rhine, with a brief stop at Cologne, and continued by water down what was the temporary truce line between the armies of Spain and the United Provinces. After calling on the English merchants established at Middelburg he was entertained by the English garrison at Flushing. Thence he embarked on 1 October and landed in London on 3 October 1608. With the rector's permission Coryate hung his shoes in Odcombe church. Coryate drew on his experiences in writing Coryats Crudities (1611), which was intended to encourage courtiers and gallants to enrich their minds by continental travel. It contains illustrations, historical data, architectural descriptions, local customs, prices, exchange rates, and food and drink, but is too diffuse and bulky - there are 864 pages in the 1905 edition - to become a vade-mecum. To solicit "panegyric verses" Coryate circulated copies of the title-page depicting his adventures and his portrait, which had been engraved by William Hole and which he considered a good likeness. About sixty contributors include many illustrious authors, not all in verse, some insulting, some pseudonymous. Prince Henry accepted the dedication but insisted that all were published' (Oxford DNB). "There probably has never been another such combination of learning and unconscious buffoonery as is here set forth. Coryate was a serious and pedantic traveller who (as he states in his title) in five months toilsome travel wandered, mostly on foot, over a large part (by his own reckoning 1,975 miles) of Western. Bookseller Inventory # 3190D

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Item Description: Jacobus Saçon for Ciriacus Hochperg,, Lyon:, 1517. 30.8 x 21.5 cm. Folio: Collation: Pt. I: 216 lvs. Collation:*10, a-z8, aa-bb8, cc6 (cc6 blank). Pt. II: 342 lvs. Collation: ??8, A-Z8, AA-QQ8, RR-SS6, TT10 The Lyon VergilIllustrated with 208 Woodcuts from the Grüninger Vergil These blocks were cut for Grüninger?s 1502 edition of Vergil, the first illustrated Vergil. The book, edited by Sebastian Brant, was extraordinary in the number and variety of its illustrations. ?Grüninger?s artist applied to the work a skilled hand and a lively imagination? The blocks must have passed to Saçon at Lyon shortly after the printing of the Strasbourg 1515 edition of Thomas Murner?s German translation of the ?Aeneid,? described in Murray?s catalogue of German books, vol. 2, no. 426? The block of Vergil and Calliope is from the title page of the 1502 edition.?(Mortimer) "The subtle detail of Sébastien Brant's woodcuts would certainly escape the spectator who could not read the text and seem, rather, calculated to appeal to one whose familiarity with the poems would allow him to appreciate precise visual allusions. In several cases, Brant's work incorporates details drawn from the commentators' interpretations. As a humanistic scholar, he is said to have placed the stamp of his own thorough knowledge of Vergil upon the book by providing master sketches for the illustrators."(Eleanor Winsor Leach) Brunet V 1282; Baudrier vol 12, pp. 344-346; Renouard, Badius Ascensius, vol. 3 p. 370-372, no. 11. Cf. Eleanor Winsor Leach, "Brant's and Dryden's Editions of Vergil" in "The Early Illustrated Book", pp. 176 ff.) and Rabb, Theodore K. "Sebastien Brant and the First Illustrated Edition of Vergil." in "Princeton University Library Chronicle 21", 1960: 187-99. A fine, complete copy, bound in 18th century calfskin. There are discreet repairs to the fore-edge and foot of the title, affecting two letters on the verso. Leaf CC1 has a tear in the gutter without loss. VERY RARE. This is the first complete copy that I have handled in 15 years of specializing in early editions of Vergil. The only other copy that I have handled lacked the full-page image of Vergil and his muse. FIRST LYON BADIUS EDITION. The third edition with these woodcuts and the last edition to include them all. Two parts in one volume with titles printed in red and black within fine architectural woodcut borders. Illustrated with 207 large woodcut illustrations (64 in the first part and 143 in the second part.) A full-page woodcut of Vergil with the muse Calliope appears on the recto of ?1. Bookseller Inventory # 2624D

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Valentini, Michael Bernhard (1657-1729)

Published by heirs of Johann David Zunner and Johann Adam Jungen,, Frankfurt: (1714)

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Item Description: heirs of Johann David Zunner and Johann Adam Jungen,, Frankfurt:, 1714. 38 x 23 cm. Folio: 3 volumes in one. With two engraved titles, 95 engraved plates, of which many double-page, 287 engravings, and 5 woodcuts in text. Collation: Vol. I: ?1 (half-title), 1 (engraved t.p.), ?4, )(4, )()(2, )()()(2, A-Z4, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Ttt4, **2, A-I4, K2, *4, **2, ?2, (A)-(P)4. Vol. II: ?1 (half-title), 1 (engraved t.p.), ?4, )()(6, A-Z4, Aa4, Bb2, a-o4, p2. Vol. III: ?4, [A]-[Z]4, [Aa]-{Ff]4, [Gg]2, a6. Complete. The Single most Valuable contribution to Wunderkammer StudiesThe Complete 3 Volume Edition A wonderful copy of Valentini?s ?Museum of museums?, a comprehensive survey of European Wunder- kunst- und Schatzkammern. ?Valentini was the personal physician to the Margrave of Assia and professor of experimental science and medicine at Giessen. His 'Museum Museorum' is the single most valuable contribution to Wunderkammer studies as it reprints many early collection catalogues [many of which are completely unobtainable now] and gives a list of all the museums known to exist at the time (some 159). Valentini also includes a catalogue of his own cabinet at Giessen and illustrates the interior of the Royal Library and Raritäten-Kammer at Vienna and an unusual view of the bear pit (with an elaborate fountain, tree houses and spectators leaning over the enclosure) at the Dresden Zoo. Valentini began his book by reprinting in its entirety the text of an earlier museological tract of 1674 by Johann Daniel Major (1636-1693). Major discussed the ways in which general collections (naturalia and artificialia) could be arranged, and addressed the basic question of why people collect. He listed the important collections known to him, and gave practical advice on specimen conservation, and on the study of museum materials. He recommended in particular that collectors prepare a catalog or "rarities book" to accompany their collection, describing not only their own specimens but also all other things that would be necessary to fill it out to optimal completeness. Major's work was the first widely circulated essay defining the various types of collections, and by 1700 the "rarities book" had become customary among collectors.?The first volume deals with plants, animals, minerals and metals, their properties and commercial and medical use. The second volume covers stones, fossils, coins, tropical plants, shells, unicorns and monstrosities. Several plates give an early attempt at the reconstruction of fossils skeletons [including a unicorn]. A separate appendix, Ost Indianische Send-Schreiben, is a compilation from Rumph, Kaempfer, Ten Rhyn and others on the rarities, mostly botanical, of the East Indies. The third volume is devoted to experiments in physics and natural philosophy with fine illustrations of the apparatus, and concluding with a dissertation on the divining rod. ?The catalogues printed by Valentini are for the Royal Museum at Vienna, Treasury of the Abbey of St. Denis and the Anatomy Cabinet at St. Victoire, the Royal Museums at Copenhagen and Dresden, the Hesse-Cassel Museum, the Treasury of Loretto, relics in the Liebfraun Kirche at Aachen, the Royal Society of England, the anatomy theatres at Leyden and Amsterdam and the Garden Gallery at Leyden, Apothecary Petiver?s cabinet, the museums of Tobias Reymer of Lüneberg, C.M. Spener of Berlin, Lorentz von Aldershelm of Leipzig, the fossils of J.G. Kisner of Frankfurt, Gottfried Nicolai of Wittenberg, J.C. Ratzel of Halberstadt, the Museum Brackenhofferianum, Professor Weigel of Jena?s astronomical instruments, J.D. Major?s Kunstkammer and the cabinet of an unnamed collector which was for sale? (Grinke, From Wunderkammer to Museum). Cobres I p. 106 n. 9; Eales 1259; Ferguson II pp.493-95; Nissen BBI 2035 and ZBI 4217; Alden 714/146. A superb copy bound in contemporary blind-stamped pigskin over wooden boards with the clasps and catches intact. A very good copy internally. Two plates remargined. One plate slightly shaved. VERY SCARCE. FIRST COMPLETE EDITION, comprising the second. Bookseller Inventory # 2922D

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Behn, Aphra (1640-89); Aesop (ca. 620-564 B.C.); Barlow, Francis (1626?-1702)

Published by Printed by H. Hills jun. for Francis Barlow, and are to be sold by Chr. Wilkinson at the Black-boy against St. Dunstan?s Church in Fleet-street, Tho. Fox in Westminster-hall, and Henry Faithorne at the Rose in St. Paul?s Church-yard,, London: (1687)

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Item Description: Printed by H. Hills jun. for Francis Barlow, and are to be sold by Chr. Wilkinson at the Black-boy against St. Dunstan?s Church in Fleet-street, Tho. Fox in Westminster-hall, and Henry Faithorne at the Rose in St. Paul?s Church-yard,, London:, 1687. 36.3 x 22.8 cm. Folio: [8], 40; 40; 17, 2-221, [3] p. COLLATION: ?1(printed title), a2, B-L2; B-L2, B-Z2, Aa-Zz2, Aaa-Ppp2. With Verses by Aphra Behn. A Fantastic, Large-Paper Copy For this second edition of his magnificent production, Barlow commissioned Aphra Behn, then at the height of her popularity as a playwright and poet, to write verses to be engraved on the 110 plates illustrating the fables. In order to substitute Behn?s verses for those of Thomas Philipot (d. 1682), the lower area of the plate needed to be burnished down and the new verses engraved onto the plate in place of the earlier ones. ?The workman doing the burnishing feared damaging the bottom border of the design above the verse: in many places traces of the tops of the letters in Philipot?s top lines remain. In a few instances a small new plate for the new verse had to be inserted.?(Hodnett)For each of the 110 illustrations Behn composed a quatrain summarizing the fable and added an additional moralizing couplet. Her fame was such that Barlow needed to include only a succinct notice of Behn?s authorship in his letter ?To the Reader?:?The Ingenious Mrs. A. Behn has been so obliging as to perform the English Poetry, which in short comprehends the Sense of the Fable and Moral: Whereof to say much were needless, since it may sufficiently recommend it self to all Persons of Understanding.?However, Behn?s poems are much more complex and convey far greater meaning than Barlow?s succinct statement might lead one to believe. And as Hodnett suggests, Behn ?may have smiled wryly at [Barlow?s] ineloquence.??In his introduction to the Earl of Devonshire, Barlow claimed a special symbolic status for ?his? fables ??a thing,? he declared, ?much practiced by the Ancient Greeks and Orientals? who used them as ?Portraitures in their Temples, design?d as Memorial Characters of Philosophic Notions to be the Subject of Adoration.? In place of these antique idols, Barlow ostentatiously offered his English readers a ?A Book ascrib?d to Aesop in a Plain and Simple Form.??Each a quatrain with a moralizing couplet tacked onto it, Behn?s fables deftly ?perform[ed]? the Aesopian premises that Barlow?s dedication had sketched. Behn feminized a number of Aesop?s fables, somewhat improbably turning the ?kingly eagle? who steals a young fox into a female, along with the kid whom a wolf woos away from its mother. A female ape begs in vain for an inch of a fox?s tail to ?vaile? her ?bum? and the fable of the dog in the manger is moralized as a story about how ?Aged Lovers? who ?court young Beautys?/ Keepe off those joys they want the power to give.? Behn?s verse not only bent fables with the crowbar of witty feminism she had perfected in the Restoration theater; writing in the last days of the Stuart monarchy, which she supported, Behn also included barely oblique references to the Stuart predicament. To the brief chronicle of a family of adders whom ?the Porcupines deceiv?d/ Of their warme Nest which cou?d not be retriev?d,? for example, she appended the observation that ?Crownes got by force are often times made good,/ By the more rough designs of war and blood.? Other fables, like that of the mouse who saves a lion from the snare by gnawing through the ropes, caution their reader not to ?despise the service of a Slave? since ?an oak did once our glorious Monarch save.? More than veiled political commentary, Behn?s fables fulfilled Barlow?s dedicatory promise that the ?Plain and Simple Form? of the Aesopian example ought to convey the impossibility of ?relating truths.?? Since Behn?s verses were printed as captions to Barlow?s illustrations, throughout the book visual images were virtually soldered to Behn?s tendentious English words. The resulting figures effectively ironized ?even parodied- the very notion of an indisputable emblem.?(Lewis, The English Fable, p. 22-24) Wing (CD-ROM, 1996), A703 With an added engraved title page, undated, lettering partially re-engraved (see Johnson's Barlow No. 3.), a. Bookseller Inventory # 3089D

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Spenser, Edmund (ca.1552-1599)

Published by printed by Thomas Creede for VVilliam Ponsonbie,, London: (1595)

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Item Description: printed by Thomas Creede for VVilliam Ponsonbie,, London:, 1595. 18 x 13 cm. Quarto: [80] p. Signatures: A-K4 Spenser?s Great Pastoral Eclogue. The First Edition, the Sole Separate Edition & The Only Edition to Appear in The 16th Century With a dedicatory epistle to ?The Right worthy and noble Knight Sir Walter Raleigh? dated ?from my house of Kilcolman, the 27. Of December. 1591.? In addition to ?Colin Clout?, this volume also includes Spenser?s ?Astrophel: A pastorall Elegie upon the death of the most Noble and valorous Knight, Sir Phillip Sidney? (dedicated to Sidney?s widow, who had by then become the Countess of Essex); An untitled poem beginning ?Ay me, to whom shall I complaine?? often referred to as ?The dolefull lay of Corinda?; ?The mourning Muse of Thestylis? (by Ludowick Bryskett); ?A pastorall Aeglogue upon the death of Sir Phillip Sidney Knight? signed L.B. (Ludowick Bryskett); ?An Elegie, or friends passion for his Astrophill? (by Matthew Roydon); ?An Epitaph upon the right honourable sir Phillip Sidney Knight: Lord governor of Flushing? (by Walter Raleigh); ?Another of the Same? (almost certainly by Sir Edward Dyer).Spenser?s ?Colin Clout?s Come Home Again?, a pastoral poem in the tradition of Petrarch, was inspired by the poet?s visit to England from 1590 to 1591, a journey undertaken at the urging of Walter Raleigh. Spenser wrote the poem, dedicated to Raleigh, upon his return to Kilcolman castle in Ireland ?the ?Home? referred to in the poem?s title. Spenser's adoption of an Anglo-Irish identity was publicly expressed in the title poem, where the 'home' that Colin refers to rather bitterly in the poem is Ireland, not England. At the same time, the elegies on Sidney as the English nation's poet imply Spenser's claim to be his successor. The poem has been called Spenser?s most biographical, and indeed it includes not only the visit from Raleigh to Spenser?s home in Ireland in 1589 but also an account of Spenser?s sea voyage and his time in England, during which he presented the first three books of his ?Faerie Queen? to Queen Elizabeth.The poem fits neatly into a tradition of advice literature that exempts the monarch from the general failings of his or her courtiers, and includes strong criticisms of the court, as well as attacks on the vanity, ignorance, and greed of courtiers in general. It is possible that Colin Clout was intended as a criticism of Elizabeth's regime in the 1590s, especially if we bear in mind Spenser's own lack of preferment in England and his posthumous criticisms of the queen in 'Two cantos of Mutabilitie' (A. Hadfield, Edmund Spenser's Irish Experience, 1997, chap. 6) Ashley V, 194; Pforzheimer 967; STC 23077 A wonderful copy bound in fine early 20th c. burgundy morocco by Riviere & Sons. Very nice internally, the last leaf carefully washed. With a woodcut printer?s device (McKerrow 299) and decorative border to the title page, and numerous head- and tailpieces throughout. A lovely copy of the first edition. This copy has the second state of sheet C, with the reading "worthily" on C1r, line 24. FIRST EDITION. The colophon reads: ?London Printed by T.C. for William Ponsonbie. 1595.?. Bookseller Inventory # 3120D

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Item Description: Imprinted by Felix Kyngston,, London:, 1610. Four parts bound as three: 19.2 x 13.8 cm. Quarto: Collation: A8, B2, C-Z8, Aa-Nn8, Oo8, Pp-Zz8, Aaa-Ddd8, Eee8, Fff-Kkk8, Lll6. Lacking the cancel Oo4, as often (The cancelland, with a dedication to Prince Henry, was removed upon the prince's death. It was removed and was to be replaced by a cancel bearing a dedication to the Earl of Nottingham but "evidently the substation was delayed for most copies occur without any dedication."-Pforzheimer.) Of Enormous Importance to Tudor Poetry & DramaThe Only Complete Edition This edition collects all three earlier parts of ?Mirrour for Magistrates? and adds ?A Winter Nights Vision? and ?Englands Eliza,? written by Richard Niccols. ?Shakespeare was familiar with it and used the story of Queen Cordelia for some points in 'King Lear.' This collection also contains the story of Locrine, which was used in the anonymous play of that name wrongly attributed to Shakespeare in the Third Folio."(Bartlett 277).The first attempt to print the ?Mirrour for Magistrates? was undertaken by John Wayland, who intended to print the text as a second volume to his edition of Lydgate?s reworking of Boccaccio?s ?Fall of Princes?(1554). The ?Mirrour? was, in fact, conceived of as a continuation of Lydgate?s ?Fall? and begins were Lydgate left off. The printing was halted for political reasons and only the title page for that intended edition was printed. The contents of all subsequent editions varied due to the influence of the nobility, editorial choices, and issues involving licenses, so that no edition is the same. The first part of the ?Mirrour? to appear in print was in fact what was to become known as the ?Third Part.? Consisting of 19 lives, covering primarily the War of the Roses, it was printed by Thomas Marshe in 1559 and exists in only 9 copies. Marshe next printed an expanded edition, with 8 additional lives, in 1563. Subsequently, other parts were written and printed, resulting in titles announcing ?The First Part? (written by John Higgins), the ?Second Part? (by Thomas Blenerhasset), and ?The Last Part? (i.e. the ?Third Part?) by William Baldwin, George Ferrers, and others. The first collected edition, which united the previously published ?First Part? and ?Last Part? (but omitted the ?Second Part?) with new material, appeared in 1587.The only complete edition of the ?Mirrour for Magistrates? (the one offered here) was printed by Felix Kyngston in 1610. The copyright to the previously published parts descended to Kyngston through his mother, Joan Orwin, from Thomas Marshe. The whole was edited by Richard Niccols (1584-1616), who wrote ?A Winter Nights Vision? and ?Englands Eliza? Ha also re-wrote the life of Richard III, and wrote several additional lives including that of King Arthur. According to Pforzheimer, this edition includes ?in addition to the new material- all of the material from the 1587 edition mentioned previously as well as ?The Second Part?, which had been omitted from that edition.The authors:William Baldwin and George Ferrers are credited with writing 19 of the lives that made up the first edition of 1559. Other contributors of note include Thomas Phaer (translator of Vergil?s ?Aeneid?), Thomas Chaloner, Thomas Churchyard, John Skelton, Thomas Heywood, and Thomas Sackville. The ?Mirrour? was enormously influential in the development of English philosophy and the conception of tragedy among the Elizabethan poets. Its influence on Shakespeare has already been noted. The poems of William Warner, Michael Drayton, and Richard Daniel also reflected its strong appeal. The tragic demises of famous men and women from English history were intended to cause those in power to ?reflect? on their own character and actions. Some of the most memorable parts include the fortunes of Edward IV?s notoriously wanton mistress Jane Shore (1445-1527), and Sackville?s celebrated poems ?Complaint of Henry Duke of Buckingham? and ?Induction?, which relates the poet?s journey to the underworld. Drayton?s ?Cromwell? was not only influenced by the ?. Bookseller Inventory # 3148D

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Henricus de Herpf (c. 1410-1477)

Published by Peter Drach, after 17 January 1484, not after, Speyer: (1486)

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Item Description: Peter Drach, after 17 January 1484, not after, Speyer:, 1486. 31.4 x 21.5 cm. Folio: 428 leaves, 48 lines, two columns. Collation: "1"8, "2"10, a-m8, n6, o-p8, q6, r-z8, A-L8, M10, N-Y8, Z6, AA6, BB-FF8. Complete. With all three blanks, a1, B8, and FF8, present. The BMC collation, calling for 8 leaves in signature n, is erroneous. A Fabulous Copy This is an extraordinarily fresh, complete example, rubricated throughout in red, with smaller initials and capital strokes. The leaves have very wide, clean margins throughout. Leaves d1-3, 6-8, N3 and 6 are printed on smaller (chancery) sheets, entirely untrimmed and with their deckled edges preserved. With a neatly written, contemporary inscription to the recto of the first leaf, identifying the work: ?Daily and Seasonal Sermons, Sermons for Saints? Days, On Penance, and The Coming of Christ on Judgment Day.? This copy has only the most minor of faults, hardly worth the mention: a small smudge to leaf f8, a light dampstain to three leaves (A7-8, C2), slight worming at beginning and end, contemporary ms. note to first and small ownership inscription to second leaf. Housed in a custom box with the gilt label of the Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica.There is no colophon, though Drach is the addressee of the introductory epistle (leaf 1b). Drach?s small, attractive printer?s device, modeled on that of Fust and Schöffer, appears on the final leaf of text. Just above it are four lines of type that read:?Reader, take these fruitful sermons of Henricus de HerpfAnd grant that you be in the power of their hospitalityFor if your library should receive them gently,Then you may trust that they will give the great rewards of friendship.?These lines are followed by a contemporary ms. note that appears to be a snide joke: ?"Certain people find them to be tiresome."Peter Drach (d. 1504) operated an extensive printing and bookselling business from Speyer, situated on the Rhine, near Heidelberg in Germany. He participated in the Frankfurt and Leipzig book fairs, and his sphere of trade extended from Antwerp to Bohemia, and from Lübeck to Rome. Drach also sold books in the business centers Nuremberg and Augsburg, and in the university cities of Tübingen and Heidelberg. His most famous client was the humanist Jakob Wimpheling.The Dutch mystic Henricus de Herpf (d. 1477) had a profound impact on later mystical writers, including Francisco de Osuna, who in turn influenced St. Teresa of Jesus.From 1445, Herpf was a rector of the Brothers of the Common Life in Delft and, later, in Gouda, where he encouraged book production in particular. In 1450, on a pilgrimage to Rome, he joined the Franciscan Observance (the Capuchin reform) at the Convent of Ara Coeli. Upon his return to northern Europe, he served in several posts for the Franciscan Observants of the Cologne Province, including as provincial of the Province of Cologne (1470?73), then guardian of the convent of Mechlin in present-day Belgium, where he died in 1477.?Herpf?s sermons concentrated on the explication of text and teaching through Scripture. The third sermon deals at length with drinking to excess. Perhaps because of his reputation as a great preacher, Herpf is mistakenly identified here as a member of the ?praedicatorum? (Dominicans). The mistake was caught during the press run, and corrected in print in some later copies to ?minorum? (Franciscans). This copy has the identification corrected in a contemporary hand, probably that of an employee in the printing shop.? (M. Ford, BPH catalogue). Bibliographical references: HC 8527; GW 12225; BMC II, 493; Goff H-38; ISTC ih00038000; Simon, Bibl. Bacchia I, 118 & Gastronomica 839. Bound in contemporary blind-stamped calf over beech wood boards, with a hand-written vellum title strip affixed to the upper board; rubbed at extremities, without central and corner bosses and clasps. A wonderful, unsophisticated copy. The leather of the joints is cracked but the boards are firmly attached by the double rawhide sewing supports. Provenance: Benedictine monastery at Asbach; J.R. Rit. Bookseller Inventory # 2567D

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Item Description: Christoph. Mangius,, Augsburg:, 1615. FIRST EDITION.. 19.2 x 15.5 cm. Quarto: a , b , A-4N , [chi] (final leaf blank and present.) With the engraved title page and the folding plan both present. The Diary of Matteo Ricci?The most influential description of China to appear during the first half of the 17th century.?-Lach The Jesuits were convinced that they had to understand China in order to win converts. Accordingly, they adopted Chinese names, dress, and language, traveled extensively, and immersed themselves in Chinese language, philosophy, art, and literature. Ricci was the first Western scholar to master Chinese, and he brought Confucian philosophy to the West. At the same time, Ricci brought to China western mathematics, scientific instruments, cartography, and astronomy, in part through his published works in Chinese, thereby ushering in a new era of Chinese understanding of the world. In 1592 Ricci famously predicted a solar eclipse with greater accuracy than the court astronomers. As a result, the emperor invited Ricci to Peking.Ricci studied in Rome, before traveling to Goa in 1578, where, apart from a period at Cochin, he remained until he traveled to China via Macao in 1582. Ricci, together with Michele de Ruggieri and other missionaries, gradually penetrated further into mainland China and established residences at Chaoch'ing in 1583 and Shaochow in 1589. From 1589, at the latter residence, Ricci adopted the dress of an educated Chinese and, due to his proficiency with Mandarin, dispensed with the services of interpreters. Despite various setbacks, Ricci's knowledge of the sciences, astronomy, and geography became appreciated by the authorities, and in 1600 Ricci was invited to enter Peking by Emperor Wan-li. Ricci arrived in the city in 1601, and a residence was established there in 1606, where Ricci was based until his death in 1610. During this period he translated a number of works into Chinese (including the first six books of Euclid), which both enhanced his reputation in cultivated Chinese circles and served to propagate Christian theology; however, his reputation stems principally from his letters and his journal, which was posthumously published under the title De christiana expeditione apud Sinas (Augsburg: 1615), edited by the Jesuit Nicolas Trigault, who brought the manuscript back from China to EuropeTrigault?s work was "the most influential description of China to appear during the first half of the 17th century. Trigault, the procurator of the Jesuits' China mission, translated and augmented the pioneer missionary Matteo Ricci's journal, aiming to elicit support for the mission. The ?De Christiana Expeditione?, therefore, is essentially a translation of Ricci's Journal. Trigault, however, did not merely translate the journal; he omitted or changed many passages, rearranged its parts, and added material from other Chinese missionaries to complete the story and to depict China and the Jesuit mission in a more favorable light. The resulting volume contains a history of the Jesuit mission in China from its inception in 1583 until Ricci's death in 1610, the same year in which Trigault arrived in China. It includes a wealth of information about China in the chapters describing Chinese geography, people, laws, government, religion, learning, commerce and the like. The ?De Christiana Expeditione?, despite its departures from Ricci's original journal, provided European readers with more, better organized, and more accurate information about China than was ever before available." (Lach, Asia in the Making of Europe, III.512) De Backer-Sommervogel VIII, 239, 6; Streit V, 2094; Cordier, Sinica 809; Löwendahl, Sino-Western Relations, Vol. I, p. 29 ff. No. 54; J. Gernet, China and the Christian Impact (1985) p. 7; Mungello, Curious Land: Jesuit accommodation and the origins of Sinology, Ch. 2; ON the provenance stamp, see Lugt, Les Marques de Collections de Dessins & d?Estampes, 3285 A fine copy bound in strictly contemporary limp vellum, soiled, lacking ties. The text is in truly. Bookseller Inventory # 2773D

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Horace [Horatius Flaccus, Quintus.] (65-8 B.C.)

Published by Joannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, 17 May,, Venice: (1483)

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Item Description: Joannes and Gregorius de Gregoriis, 17 May,, Venice:, 1483. A Fine Venetian Incunabulum Horace?s Poems With the Commentary of Cristoforo LandinoA Beautiful Copy The works of Horace with the commentary of the celebrated Renaissance humanist Cristoforo Landino (1424-1498), tutor to Lorenzo and Giuliano de Medici and member of Marsilio Ficino?s Florentine academy. His literary skills were wide-ranging and his edition of the ?Commedia? marked a watershed in Dante criticism. Landino?s was the first humanist commentary to be written on Horace?s poems.?Horace as the poet of serene balance, of detachment from passion, of moderation: this image is deeply rooted. And the traditional image, in this case as in others, is quite close to the truth. It leads us to sense, first of all, the central role that thought and philosophical culture plays in Horatian lyric. Here it is natural to think of the poet of the Satires and the assimilation, through the diatribe tradition, of concepts and problems of the Hellenistic schools of philosophy; this feature renders Horace?s pronouncements substantially different from those of early Greek lyric. Nonetheless, it is no more than a genuine moral inquiry based on the critical observation of others. In a certain sense one may say that the Odes begin where the Satires leave off, with a thoughtful meditation upon a few fundamental achievements of philosophy, Epicurean philosophy in particular. These basic notions, which, to be sure, also owe something to common sense, receive from Horace a formulation that is so clear and incisive that they have become part of the European cultural heritage, which has often drawn upon Horace?s poetry as a storehouse of maxims."The cardinal point is the awareness of the brevity of life, which implies the need to take the joys of the moment, without getting lost in the fruitless concerns over hopes, ambitions, and fears. The exhortation to Leuconoe is the most famous of all:?Sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi spem longam reseces. Dum loquimur, fugerit invidi aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.? ?Be wise, strain the wine; and since time is brief, reduce lengthy hope. While we are speaking, envious life will have fled: seize the day, and do not trust to tomorrow.?[I.II.6 ff.] "The wise man will deal with events as they are and be able to accept them. He relies on the present alone, which he seeks to capture in its flight, and he acts as if each day of life were his last. The ?carpe diem? therefore, should not be misunderstood as a banal invitation to pleasure; in Horace, as also in Epicurus, the invitation to pleasure is not separate from the keen awareness that the pleasure itself is fleeting, as human life is fleeting. The only possibility is to erect, against the imminence of death or misfortune, the solid protection of possessions already enjoyed, happiness already experienced." (Conte, "Latin Literature, A History") Goff H 448; GW 13459; BMC , V 339 Bound in contemporary quarter calf over quarter-sawn wooden boards with expert repairs to the spine. There is a small metal attachment for a now-lost clasp. This is an almost spotless copy with only a light ink smudge on leaf x5v. The margins are broad, the paper crisp, and the text is rubricated in red and blue throughout. There are some contemporary marginal notes and interlinear glosses. Beautiful. Provenance: There is a contemporary or near-contemporary ownership inscription and an old institutional stamp of the Herzoglicher S. Meiningischer Bibliothek both on the blank recto of the first leaf. SECOND EDITION WITH LANDINO?S COMMENTARY. [The editio princeps was printed ca. 1471, also at Venice.]. Bookseller Inventory # 2976D

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Thucydides (ca. 455-ca. 400 B.C.); Hobbes, Thomas, translator (1588-1679)

Published by Imprinted [at Eliot?s Court Press] for Hen: Seile, and are to be sold at the Tigres Head in Paules Churchyard,, London: (1629)

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Item Description: Imprinted [at Eliot?s Court Press] for Hen: Seile, and are to be sold at the Tigres Head in Paules Churchyard,, London:, 1629. FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE.. 31 x 21 cm. Folio: [34], 536 [i.e. 535], [13] pp. Collation: A4, a-c4, B-Z4, Aa-Zz4, Aaa-Yyy4, Zzz6 (the final leaf is blank and present). With an added engraved title page and five engraved plates, three of which are folding. Hobbes? Thucydides. The First Edition in a Contemporary Binding Hobbes published his translation in 1629, when he was in his early forties. Yet he tells us in the introduction that the translation, once completed ?lay long by? him, indicating that it had been completed much earlier.?Hobbes was interested in Thucydides less for his style than his subject matter. Nor did he take up the study and translation of the Greek historian simply with a scholar?s antiquarian interest, but with the humanist desire to learn and pass on the lessons of history to his contemporaries. He is not shy of speaking of the utility of history. He talks of Thucydides? writings ?as having in them profitable instruction for Noblemen, and such as may come to have the managing of great and weighty actions.? It is in the history of Thucydides that the purposes of history are most finely embodied: ?For the principall and proper worke of History, being to instruct, and enable men, by the knowledge of Actions past, to beare themselves prudently in the present, and providently towards the Future, there is not extant any other (merely humane) that doth more fully, and naturally performe it, then this of my Author.???Hobbes had very definite ideas about the conclusions to be drawn from Thucydides. In the long introductory essay, ?Of the Life and History of Thucydides?, he derives from the history an account of the political opinions of its author:?For his opinion touching the government of the State, it is manifest that he least of all liked the Democracy. And upon divers occasions, hee noteth the emulation and contention of the Demagogues, for reputation, and glory of wit; with their crossing of each others counsels to the damage of the Publique; the inconstancy of Resolutions, caused by the diversity of ends, and power of Rhetorique in the Orators; and the desperated actions undertaken upon the flattering advice of such as desired to attaine, or to hold what they had attained of authority and sway amongst the common people. Nor doth it appeare, that he magnifieth anywhere the authority of the Few; amongst whom he saith every one desireth to be chiefe; and they that are undervalued, beare it with lesse patience than in a Democracy; whereupon sedition followeth, and dissultion of the government. Hee prayseth the government of Athens, when it was mixed of the Few and the Many; but more he commendeth it, both when Pisistratus raigned (saving that it was an usurped power) and when in the beginning of this Warre, it was Democraticall in name, but in effect Monarchicall under Pericles.??Thucydides here is represented as a closet royalist. The passage to which Hobbes is directly referring, which must have been written after the final defeat of Athens in 404, is Thucydides summary account of the causes of her downfall in Book II. This is a long but crucial passage in Hobbes? translation, a shortcut to the lessons to be learnt from the larger narrative. While there are many factors that contributed to the political philosophy later developed by Hobbes (not least his experience of civil disorder in Britain), it might be argued that the political analysis here of the weakness of the Athenian democracy was influential in defining a problem to which the doctrine of Leviathan was the solution.?(Robin Sowerby, ?Thomas Hobbes? Translation of Thucydides?)"The historical methods of Thucydides, who lived in the fifth century B.C., have never been bettered. His severe standard of historical truth, coupled with his passionate belief in the general significance of particular events, have given his history of the tragic war between Athens and Sparta a universal value to statesmen and historians alike." (Printing and the Mind of Man, 219) STC 24058; Macdonald & Hargreaves, T. Bookseller Inventory # 3110D

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Elizabeth I, Queen of England (1533-1603)]

Published by Imprinted? in Povles Churcheyarde by Richard Iugge and Iohn Cavvood, Printers to the Quenes Maiestie,, London: (1559)

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Item Description: Imprinted? in Povles Churcheyarde by Richard Iugge and Iohn Cavvood, Printers to the Quenes Maiestie,, London:, 1559. 18 x 13 cm. Quarto: [14] pp. Collation: A-B4 (lacking blank leaf B4) First Edition of Queen Elizabeth?s Visitation ArticlesFrom the Library of the Elizabethan Book Collector Humphrey Dyson (1582-1633) With the signature of the 16th c. book collector Humphrey Dyson (1582-1633) at the foot of the title page. The bookplate of Albert Ehrman, with his motto ?Pro Viribus Summis Contendo? is affixed to the front pastedown. This was lot 270 in the 1978 sale of Ehrman?s library. Very rare. ESTC locates 4 copies in the U.S.: Folger, Huntington, Harvard, Yale.First edition of the first visitation articles established for the reformed church after Elizabeth?s accession. The visitation articles are a series of 56 questions that were to be asked by church commissioners as they visited each parish within the kingdom. They include inquiries into the number of people imprisoned, starved or burned at the stake during Mary?s reign; the number of known drunkards, adulterers, brawlers, sorcerers, book burners, possessors of unlawful books, and minstrels or others who ?do use to synge or saye anye songes or dytties that be vyle or uncleane, and especially in derision of anye godly ordre, nowe sette forth and established? in a given parish.?On 19 July 1559 Elizabeth issued a royal proclamation publishing her fifty-three ?Injunctions,? which set forth to the clergy the form and substance of the Elizabethan Church established by the 1559 Act of Uniformity. Besides calling ?all ecclesiastical persons? to observe all the laws that restored to the Crown the ancient jurisdiction over the ?state ecclesiastical,? the Injunctions specified that educated and licensed preachers should preach the Word of God (or lacking such preachers, that homilies should be read); that accessories for Catholic worship should be removed from churches and that Bibles should replace them? They called upon the Queen?s subjects to live in charity and to avoid religious epithets like ?papist? or ?schismatic? as words of reproach. Among the Injunctions, one called for press licensing to deter printed books against the religious settlement? Besides those statutes that established Elizabeth?s succession and Church settlement, among the earliest acts of Elizaneth I?s first Parliament were those that extended the Marian treason statutes. The first of these included, in the definition of high treason, writing or printing anything saying that the Queen was not entitled to rule or that someone else was. The second act extended the Marian statute that criminalized false, slanderous, and seditious news about the Queen.? (Clegg, Censorship and the Press, (1580-1720) pp. 9-10)That the re-implementation of Protestant reforms was of paramount importance for Elizabeth is reflected in the second and third articles:The second article inquires ?Whether in theyr Churches and chapels, al ymages, shrynes, al tables, Candelstickes, Trindelles, or rolles of Mare, Pictures, Payntynges, and al other monuments of fayned and false myracles, Pylgrymages, ydolatrye, and superstition be removed, abolished and destroyed.? While the third asks whether the vicars? ?openly, playnley, and distinctlye, recite to theyr paryshners in the Pulpit, the Lordes prayer, the Belief, and the tenne commaundements in Englyshe.?Further, each parishioner is to be ?admonished? that they ought not to presume to receive the sacrament of the body & bloud of Christ before they can perfectly [recite] the Lordes prayer, the articles of the faith, and the x. commaundementes in Englyshe.?(Article 12)And of course, the old rite is to be suppressed. In article 9, the Commissioners are asked to discover whether any of the vicars, curates, or ministers declare ?anyte thynge to the extollynge or settynge forth of vayne and superstitious religion, pylgrimages, reliques, or ymages, or lyghtyngge of candelles, kyssinge, knelynge, eckynge of the same ymages.?The question regarding sorcery seems to encompass the work of midwives: ?Whether you knowe any that doe. Bookseller Inventory # 2653D

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Item Description: Io. Froben, and Excusum per Renatu[m] Beck in aedibus zum Thiergarten, and Jean Petit, In vico Sancti Iacobi, 1515 and 1515 and, Basel: and Strasbourg: and Paris:, 1513. Large Quarto: 3 works bound in one volume: I. Piccolomini: i-iv, A-B4, C8, D-E4, F8, G-H4, I8, K-L4, M8, N-O4, P6. II. Lactantius: A6, B4, a-z8/4, A-D8/4, E6, F-N8/4, O6, P4. III. "Praise of Folly": a-h4, a-z4, A-B4, C6 The 1515 Froben ?Praise of Folly?In a Humanist SammelbandBound in Contemporary Pigskin and Wooden Boards This edition includes the original dedicatory letter to Thomas More, whose name Erasmus plays upon cleverly in the title of the work; and the letter to Martin Dorp in which Erasmus explains his motives for writing the ?Moria?: ?My aim in the ?Folly? was exactly the same as in my other works. Only the presentation was different. In the ?Enchiridion? I simply outlined the pattern of a Christian life. In my little book, the ?Education of a Christian Prince?, I offered plain advice on how to instruct a prince. In my ?Panegyric? I did the same under the veil of eulogy as I had done elsewhere explicitly. And in the ?Folly? I expressed the same ideas as in the ?Enchiridion?, but in the form of a joke.? The Froben edition is augmented with a number of other texts (See the final paragraphs of this description.)Praise of Folly:?The ?Praise of Folly? is Erasmus? most famous and controversial work? In Erasmus? lifetime, the ?Moria? was condemned in 1527 by the theologians of Paris for its attacks on faith and morality and again in 1533 by the Franciscans, who found it full of heresies. The officials of the Sorbonne put it on the list of condemned books in 1542 and 1543, a list that was the basis of the Tridentine Index of 1564??The ?Moria? may start as a learned joke to amuse a fellow humanist [Thomas More] but it moves into sharp criticism of contemporary mores, and ends with a plea for a return to the Christianity of the Gospels? Erasmus writes in a Lucianic spirit of irreverent burlesque of the gods of classical mythology and light-hearted amusement at the irrationality of mankind. Folly argues that she is all that is natural, youthful, fecund, and happy, and that life would be intolerable if it were not ruled by civilized conventions, which necessitate a degree of humbug and illusion. By contrast, the Stoic ideal rational man is a ?kind of marble statue of a man, devoid of sense and any sort of human feeling.? She [then] shifts her viewpoint and lists the people who enjoy her benefits in so far as they try to preserve their illusions or are happy in their ignorance, self-deception, or self-love. She even adds superstitious piety to alchemy, gambling, and the nobility?s obsession with hunting and extravagant building??[Next] Erasmus starts to deliver a sharp and often bitter attack on all the victims of blind folly, those who are deaf to the voice of true religion and lacking the gentler Christian virtues, among whom are sycophants, self-seekers, money-makers, pedants, scholastics, lawyers, theologians, superstitious worshippers of images and relics, courtiers and kings, worldly monks, and irreligious pontiffs. This section culminates in a savage thrust at Pope Julius II, the bellicose pope. The keen wit and ingenuity of the satire can be highly entertaining, but there is no note of gaiety now. As Erasmus surveys the gulf between the Church and the ?true philosophy of Christ? he moves into the final section, where the alternative offered to barren scholasticism is the vision of reality taken from Plato, and folly in the sense used by Saint Paul, that of receptivity to the Christian message by the ?fool in Christ.? All irony is dropped, until the final short epilogue when Folly light-heartedly cuts short her ?hotch-potch of words?; this is a direct and simply worded account of Erasmus? personal belief, moving into an exposition of the Neoplatonist concept that the soul?s ascent to beatitude ends in ecstasy, a form of folly which is its supreme fulfillment.?(Betty Radice, CWE Vol. 27, pp. 78 ff.)Piccolomini?s ?Germania?:Shortly after 1455, Aeneas Sylvius Piccolomini came into possession of the recently rediscovered man. Bookseller Inventory # 2454D

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