Claremont Review Writing ContestThe Claremont Review, launched in March 1992, is run by unpaid volunteers who act as co-editors. It has been acclaimed across North America for nurturing young writers and poets, and even counts playwright Neil Simon among its subscribers. The magazine was named after a local high school in Victoria, BC that helped launch the title and where several editors teach.

Contestants aged 13 to 19 years old can supply one story or three poems per entry. The closing date is March 15th and writers can log on to www.theclaremontreview.ca/annual_contest.htm or click the eye on the poster icon on this page for entry details. All winning entries will be published in The Claremont Review’s fall edition. The three winners in both categories will receive prizes of $500, $300 and $200 respectively. All entrants receive a one year subscription to the magazine.

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The Claremont Review supports excellence in literature; here are some of their favorite works.

Picnic, Lightning

Billy Collins

Picnic, Lightening

Over the past decade, Billy Collins has emerged as the most beloved American poet since Robert Frost, garnering critical acclaim and broad popular appeal. Annie Proulx admits, "I have never before felt possessive about a poet, but I am fiercely glad that Billy Collins is ours."

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Rock Springs

Richard Ford

Rock Springs

In these ten stories, Ford mines literary gold from the wind-scrubbed landscape of the American West--and from the guarded hopes and gnawing loneliness of the people who live there. Rock Springs is a masterpiece of taut narration, cleanly chiseled prose, and empathy so generous that it feels like a kind of grace.

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Wild Iris

Louise Gluck

Wild Iris

The Wild Iris was written during a ten-week period in the summer of 1991. Louise Cluck's first four collections consistently returned to the natural world, to the classical and biblical narratives that arose to explain the phenomena of this world, to provide meaning and to console.

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Birds of America

Lorrie Moore

Birds of America

Birds of America is a stunning collection of twelve stories by Lorrie Moore, one of our finest authors at work today. With her characteristic wit and piercing intelligence she unfolds a series of portraits of the lost and unsettled of America, and with a trademark humor that fuels each story with pathos and understanding.

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Different Hours

Stephen Dunn

Different Hours

Stephen Dunn, in his startling and graceful eleventh collection, often set in southern New Jersey where he makes his home, continues to find his subjects in the dailiness of life, at the same time expanding his vision to a darker emotional landscape.

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Runaway

Alice Munro

Runaway

In Alice Munro's superb new collection, we find stories about women of all ages and circumstances, their lives made palpable by the subtlety and empathy of this incomparable writer.

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Sledgehammer

John Mackenzie

Sledgehammer

"This is the work of the hammer: to break us open," writes John MacKenzie in this eloquent debut. His poems draw upon his Maritime roots-the earthy talk and wry humor; the daily grind of physical labor; the tug of family ties.

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Interpreter of Maladies

Jhumpa Lahiri

Interpreter of Maladies

Navigating between the Indian traditions they've inherited and the baffling new world, the characters in Jhumpa Lahiri's elegant, touching stories seek love beyond the barriers of culture and generations.

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