9780684848280

Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography--The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa

Mathabane, Mark

ISBN 10: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7
ISBN 13: 9780684848280
Publisher: Free Press
Publication Date: 1998
Binding: Softcover
Editorial Reviews for this title:
Synopsis:
The Classic Story of Life in Apartheid South Africa

Mark Mathabane was weaned on devastating poverty and schooled in the cruel streets of South Africa's most desperate ghetto, where bloody gang wars and midnight police raids were his rites of passage. Like every other child born in the hopelessness of apartheid, he learned to measure his life in days, not years. Yet Mark Mathabane, armed only with the courage of his family and a hard-won education, raised himself up from the squalor and humiliation to win a scholarship to an American university.

This extraordinary memoir of life under apartheid is a triumph of the human spirit over hatred and unspeakable degradation. For Mark Mathabane did what no physically and psychologically battered "Kaffir" from the rat-infested alleys of Alexandra was supposed to do -- he escaped to tell about it.

Review:
Kaffir Boy does for apartheid-era South Africa what Richard Wright's Black Boy did for the segregated American South. In stark prose, Mathabane describes his life growing up in a nonwhite ghetto outside Johannesburg--and how he escaped its horrors. Hard work and faith in education played key roles, and Mathabane eventually won a tennis scholarship to an American university. This is not, needless to say, an opportunity afforded to many of the poor blacks who make up most of South Africa's population. And yet Mathabane reveals their troubled world on these pages in a way that only someone who has lived this life can.

Review

Editorial reviews may belong to another edition of this title.
 

Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography--The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa: Search Results

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Kaffir Boy (ISBN: 9780684848280)
Mathabane, Mark
ISBN 10: 0684848287
ISBN 13: 9780684848280
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KAFFIR BOY (ISBN: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7)
Mathabane, Mark
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Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (ISBN: 9780684848280)
Mathabane, Mark
ISBN 10: 0684848287
ISBN 13: 9780684848280
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Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth s Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (Paperback) (ISBN: 9780684848280)
Mathabane, Mark
ISBN 10: 0684848287
ISBN 13: 9780684848280
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Book Description: Simon Schuster Ltd, United Kingdom, 2006. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reissue. 211 x 140 mm. Brand New Book. I am always asked to explain what it felt like to grow up black under South Africa s system of legalized racism known as apartheid, and how I escaped from it and ended up in America. This book is the most thorough answer I have heretofore given. The last thing I ever dreamed of when I was daily battling for survival and for an identity other than that of inferiority and fourth-class citizen, which apartheid foisted on me, was that someday I would attend an American college, edit its newspaper, graduate with honors, practise journalism and write a book. How could I have dreamed of all this when I was born of illiterate parents who could not afford to pay my way through school, let alone pay the rent for our shack and put enough food on the table; when black people in Alexandra lived under constant police terror and the threat of deportation to impoverished tribal reserves; when at ten I contemplated suicide because I found the burden of living in a ghetto, poverty-stricken and without hope, too heavy to shoulder; when in 1976 I got deeply involved in the Soweto protests, in which hundreds of black students were killed by the police, and thousands fled the country to escape imprisonment and torture? In Kaffir Boy I have re-created, as best as I can remember, all these experiences. I have sought to paint a portrait of my childhood and youth in Alexandra, a black ghetto of Johannesburg, where I was born and lived for eighteen years, with the hope that the rest of the world will finally understand why apartheid cannot be reformed: it has to be abolished. Much has been written and spoken about the politics of apartheid: the forced removals of black communities from theirancestral lands, the Influx Control and Pass laws that mandate where blacks can live, work, raise families, be buried; the migrant labour system that forces black men to live away from their families eleven months out of a year; the breaking up of black families in the ghettos as the authorities seek to create a so-called white South Africa; the brutal suppression of the black majority as it agitates for equal rights. But what does it all mean in human terms? When I was growing up in Alexandra it meant hate, bitterness, hunger, pain, terror, violence, fear, dashed hopes and dreams. Today it still means the same for millions of black children who are trapped in the ghettos of South Africa, in a lingering nightmare of a racial system that in many respects resembles Nazism. In the ghettos black children fight for survival from the moment they are born. They take to hating and fearing the police, soldiers and authorities as a baby takes to its mother s breast. In my childhood these enforcers of white prerogatives and whims represented a sinister force capable of crushing me at will; of making my parents flee in the dead of night to escape arrest under the Pass laws; of marching them naked out of bed because they did not have the permit allowing them to live as husband and wife under the same roof. They turned my father -- by repeatedly arresting him and denying him the right to earn a living in a way that gave him dignity -- into such a bitter man that, as he fiercely but in vain resisted the emasculation, he hurt those he loved the most. The movies, with their lurid descriptions of white violence, reinforced this image of white terror and power. Often the products of abjectpoverty and broken homes, many black children, for whom education is inferior and not compulsory, have been derailed by movies into the dead-end life of crime and violence. It is no wonder that black ghettos have one of the highest murder rates in the world, and South African prisons are among the most packed. It was purely by accident that I did not end up a tsotsi (thug, mugger, gangster). It was no coincidence that, until the age of ten, I refused to set foot in the white world. The turning point came when one day in my eleventh year I accompanied my grandmother to her gardening job. Bookseller Inventory # ABZ9780684848280

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5.
Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth s Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (Paperback) (ISBN: 9780684848280)
Mathabane, Mark
ISBN 10: 0684848287
ISBN 13: 9780684848280
Bookseller: The Book Depository US (Gloucester, ., United Kingdom)
Bookseller Rating: 5-star rating
Quantity Available: 10

Book Description: Simon Schuster Ltd, United Kingdom, 2006. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reissue. 211 x 140 mm. Brand New Book. I am always asked to explain what it felt like to grow up black under South Africa s system of legalized racism known as apartheid, and how I escaped from it and ended up in America. This book is the most thorough answer I have heretofore given. The last thing I ever dreamed of when I was daily battling for survival and for an identity other than that of inferiority and fourth-class citizen, which apartheid foisted on me, was that someday I would attend an American college, edit its newspaper, graduate with honors, practise journalism and write a book. How could I have dreamed of all this when I was born of illiterate parents who could not afford to pay my way through school, let alone pay the rent for our shack and put enough food on the table; when black people in Alexandra lived under constant police terror and the threat of deportation to impoverished tribal reserves; when at ten I contemplated suicide because I found the burden of living in a ghetto, poverty-stricken and without hope, too heavy to shoulder; when in 1976 I got deeply involved in the Soweto protests, in which hundreds of black students were killed by the police, and thousands fled the country to escape imprisonment and torture? In Kaffir Boy I have re-created, as best as I can remember, all these experiences. I have sought to paint a portrait of my childhood and youth in Alexandra, a black ghetto of Johannesburg, where I was born and lived for eighteen years, with the hope that the rest of the world will finally understand why apartheid cannot be reformed: it has to be abolished. Much has been written and spoken about the politics of apartheid: the forced removals of black communities from theirancestral lands, the Influx Control and Pass laws that mandate where blacks can live, work, raise families, be buried; the migrant labour system that forces black men to live away from their families eleven months out of a year; the breaking up of black families in the ghettos as the authorities seek to create a so-called white South Africa; the brutal suppression of the black majority as it agitates for equal rights. But what does it all mean in human terms? When I was growing up in Alexandra it meant hate, bitterness, hunger, pain, terror, violence, fear, dashed hopes and dreams. Today it still means the same for millions of black children who are trapped in the ghettos of South Africa, in a lingering nightmare of a racial system that in many respects resembles Nazism. In the ghettos black children fight for survival from the moment they are born. They take to hating and fearing the police, soldiers and authorities as a baby takes to its mother s breast. In my childhood these enforcers of white prerogatives and whims represented a sinister force capable of crushing me at will; of making my parents flee in the dead of night to escape arrest under the Pass laws; of marching them naked out of bed because they did not have the permit allowing them to live as husband and wife under the same roof. They turned my father -- by repeatedly arresting him and denying him the right to earn a living in a way that gave him dignity -- into such a bitter man that, as he fiercely but in vain resisted the emasculation, he hurt those he loved the most. The movies, with their lurid descriptions of white violence, reinforced this image of white terror and power. Often the products of abjectpoverty and broken homes, many black children, for whom education is inferior and not compulsory, have been derailed by movies into the dead-end life of crime and violence. It is no wonder that black ghettos have one of the highest murder rates in the world, and South African prisons are among the most packed. It was purely by accident that I did not end up a tsotsi (thug, mugger, gangster). It was no coincidence that, until the age of ten, I refused to set foot in the white world. The turning point came when one day in my eleventh year I accompanied my grandmother to her gardening job. Bookseller Inventory # ABZ9780684848280

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Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography--The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (ISBN: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7)
Mathabane, Mark
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Kaffir Boy The True Story of a Black Youths Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (ISBN: 9780684848280)
Mathabane, Mark
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Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography--The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (ISBN: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7)
Mathabane, Mark
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Kaffir Boy: The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (Paperback) (ISBN: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7)
Mathabane, Mark
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ISBN 13: 9780684848280
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Book Description: Paperback. Book Condition: New. 140mm x 23mm x 211mm. Paperback. The Classic Story of Life in Apartheid South AfricaMark Mathabane was weaned on devastating poverty and schooled in the cruel streets of South Africa's most desperate ghetto, where bl.Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability. 368 pages. 0.327. Bookseller Inventory # 9780684848280

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Kaffir Boy: An Autobiography--The True Story of a Black Youth's Coming of Age in Apartheid South Africa (ISBN: 0684848287 / 0-684-84828-7)
Mathabane, Mark
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