Top Marketplace offers for ISBN

9780374227302

Genesis: A Novel (Crace, Jim)

Crace, Jim Author

3.07 avg rating
( 14 ratings by GoodReads )
Not the book you're looking for? Search for all books with this author and title
9780374227302: Genesis: A Novel (Crace, Jim)

A major new novel about sex and the citizen by the award-winning author of Being Dead

The timid life of actor Felix Dern is uncorrupted by Hollywood, where his success has not yet been shackled with any intrusive fame. But in the theaters and the restaurants of his own city, "Lix" is celebrated and admired for his looks, for his voice, and for his unblemished private life. He has succeeded in courting popularity everywhere, this handsome hero of the left, this charming darling of the right, this ever-twisting weather vane.

A perfect life? No, he is blighted. He has been blighted since his teens, for every woman he sleeps with bears his child. So now it is Mouetta's turn. Their baby's due in May. Lix wants to say he feels besieged. Another child? To be so fertile is a curse...

In Genesis, Jim Crace, winner of the National Book Critics' Circle Award and the Whitbread Novel of the Year, charts the sexual history of a loving, baffled man, the sexual emancipation of a city, and the sexual ambiguities of humankind.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

Jim Crace is the author of seven previous novels, including Being Dead (FSG, 2000) which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction, and, most recently, The Devil's Larder (FSG, 2001). He lives in Birmingham, England.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

1

Lix left it late. Till November 1979. He was almost twenty-one and it was nearly midnight when he first had sex with anyone. Full docking sex, that is. Full snug-'n'-comfy. Like almost everybody else his age, of course, he'd had hand jobs, not only with himself since he was twelve but twice with helpful boys at school and once (a birthday treat when he was seventeen) with an unsuspicious girl, one of nature's volunteers. Her first time with a boy. She'd seemed surprised at what she'd done, at what she'd made him do, and with such little exertion. She jumped back just in time, so that only her sandal and her wrist were soiled by Lix's sudden gratitude.
On that night of his induction-if it were not for the birthmark on his cheek-you would not recognize the celebrated Lix. Less heavy for a start, less grand. And much more volatile, as you'd expect of someone in his first semester free of parents and the family home. He was training for the stage at the academy. This was a time when Theater, newly unleashed from the censors, was argumentative and powerful. Lix truly wanted to improve the world, believed that Art was Revolution's smarter twin, that Acting and Action were equal partners. Collaborators, in fact. He'd signed up with the Mime/Scream Community Drama Collective in his first month as a student and was active, too, in Street Beat Renegades, Provocations & Co., and the Next Stage (as in Paul Roesenthaler's "The next stage is the elimination of captains, chaplains, and kings"). He didn't have a repertoire, Lix said (adapting Roesenthaler yet again, our city's feted radical), he had "an onstage manifesto." Actors seemed to be the partisans of change back in those simpler times when appointees and the army controlled our lives even more completely than they do now, now that-to chant the cynics' chorus-theater is unfettered and trifling, all our leaders have been democratically imposed, and Freedom has destroyed our impulse to be free.
Lix had a democratically modest fourth-floor room amongst the tenements down on the wharf, with not only skylight views across the newly named City of Kisses toward the river but also a narrow glimpsing view from his box kitchen into Cargo Street, where now there are boutiques and restaurants instead of groceries and bars and "working folk."
The woman who had set her heart that night on Lix stood with his binoculars (where he had stood and spied on her so many times), her back against the little stove, her face veiled by the curtains, the rubber eyecups pressed against her lids and focused on the late night customers, the waitress, and the owner in the sidewalk cafe below, across the street. His stolen daily view of her. She was surprised how large the people seemed-they filled the lens-and how unsuspecting, uninhibited, they were, free to mutter to themselves, or stare, or rearrange their belts and straps, or swing their legs, with no idea that they were being scrutinized. "So!" she said. So this was where the owl had his nest. "I've often wondered what the view would be like if I were looking down on me!"
Lix was embarrassed, obviously. Caught out. He was also frightened and aroused. For all his noisy confidence, he'd never had an unrelated woman in his room before. What might it mean? He watched her from the kitchen door, his arms stretched up to grip the lintel, his printed T-shirt riding high above his belt to inadvertently display an adolescent abdomen and the apex of his pubic hair.
She, too, seemed large and detailed, in a way she'd never been through his binoculars. Her outfit was familiar, of course, her general shape. He recognized the fashionable "Sandinista" tunic suit with its half sleeves and "rough-look" calf-length skirt. He recognized the matching spangled rebel scarf. But mostly she was unfamiliar. The angle, for a start, was different. He'd mostly seen her from above, the shoulders and the head. Binoculars had shortened her. Binoculars diminish the world, reduce the senses to one. Precision optical instruments, no matter how finely ground, fogproof, waterproof, and vision-adjusted, could not hope to convey true proximity, the candid softness of the flesh, the spiciness of scent, the rustling, independent simpering of clothes, the clink of her bracelets, the perfect imperfections and the blemishes of someone close to thirty years of age. Until that night, he'd only seen this woman from afar.
Lix, actually, like many young men, was practiced in the art of watching women from afar, not always through binoculars, of course, but women he could only dream of touching, women he could only scheme about: his voice tutor at the Arts Academy, the swan-necked student called Freda from one of the science faculties, the daughter of the concierge at his apartment house, the overscented cashier in the campus cafeteria, the tiny half-Greek actress in his course, the bursar's haughty wife in her white suits, the many tough and visionary women in
cf0his "groups," and-let's admit the universal truth-any female under fifty simply chancing into view. All worshipped from afar. They'd all be judged and sifted, feeding his mind's eye, as casually and unself-consciously as a sea anemone might sift the random flotsam in its reach.
When you're that young and inexperienced you take in fantasies with every breath. You mean no harm. But then you don't expect a distant fantasy to walk up to your room. You don't imagine that the woman waiting for her boyfriend every evening after work in the sidewalk cafe below your kitchen window will ever be so close and intimate except through your binoculars. You cannot know, might never know, that she will be the mother of your eldest child.

She'd noticed him standing there with his binoculars many times in the preceding weeks, behind the twitching curtains in the rented rooms. The shifting lenses caught the light and signaled to the street. As did the pale and transfixed face beyond, with its dark birthmark on the upper cheek. She hadn't minded that he was spying on her. Being watched and waiting for your lover was much less tedious than simply waiting unobserved. She did not display herself, exactly. She stayed demure; crossed legs, with a newspaper or magazine to read, perhaps, or a letter to write to her sister in Canada. Sometimes a book. Occasionally a cigarette. She always seemed so self-contained and concentrated, this little information clerk in her expressive outfits. Always looking down. She had learned to watch the upper window in the building opposite without lifting her head. Men weren't as undetectable as they imagined. And she did seek out the best-lit tables in the sidewalk cafe, the ones most favored by the evening sun, the ones directly opposite the snooper's room. She liked this silent and seductive rendezvous.
It had occurred to her, of course, that any man so patient and persistent with binoculars, and fixated enough to waste his time staring through his lenses at her, might not be honorable or sane or attractive even. She'd seen the remake of the classic Peeping Tom. She'd read the trial reports of dangerous voyeurs. There was something animal about his spying, too: faces at windows, figures in caves. She should have been more fearful and more wary. Yet she felt safe. She had spotted her admirer once, out on the street. There'd been no mistaking that birthmark, or how unmenacing he seemed. The young man was striking. The blemish on the face was beautiful, an unexpected touch of innocence for one so secretive and scheming. She was surprised, as well, how adolescent he was. That made his voyeurism charming almost, more forgivable, appropriate. How satisfying to have magnetized a fellow scarcely out of his teens
fs20when she-a mere month off her thirtieth birthday, not married yet herself but desperately dependent on a married man-had almost dismissed herself as being attractive to no one single.
It can be no surprise, then (given how her sense of worth had been diminishing), that the daily half an hour between her ending work and her part-time lover getting to the cafe became for a month or so the best part of her day. She sat with a perc of coffee, out on the street, her body trim, and was desired. Desired sexually. Desired simply for the way she looked by the young man now swinging from the door frame only a meter behind her, with his sweet, appealing midriff and the kiss-me birthmark on his face. She did not want him for a lover. She didn't even want him for a friend. She wanted him just once, just for the hour, and just to reassure herself. A "little interlude" to salve her wounds.
Her "little interlude" had not been planned. She'd never cheated on a man before. Never needed to. But when the call had come through to the cafe that evening to tell her that her lover had been delayed and that he'd phone the next day at her office "when he got the chance," then she'd been troubled and offended beyond words. The small offenses irritated most-the effort she had expended after work, before arriving at the cafe, touching up her makeup, fixing her hair, changing into clothes he liked, the time she'd squandered during the day imagining their meeting, rehearsing their embrace-although the larger implications were unignorable and frightening. The pattern was familiar. This was the third time in ten days that he had let her down in one way or another. This was the third cheating husband in the last two years who had disillusioned her. She took the hint. She felt the chill. Another cooling, flagging man was scuttling from her life.
She'd started out the day as a woman with some status, not bloated with self-regard like some people she could name but confident enough to know that she was valued somewhere. Whenever she was waiting in the cafe-an almost daily routine for the past three months-she had a purpose and a role. She was the early half of a couple, waiting to be validated by her man-and that was satisfying. The owner and the little waitress understood that she would arrive before the boyfriend, that she would order a coffee and-occasionally-a glass of mineral water. They were used to her eager nervousn...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Buy New View Book
List Price: US$
US$ 1.00

Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 2.95
Within U.S.A.

Destination, Rates & Speeds

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Crace, Jim Author
Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Your Online Bookstore
(Houston, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. 0374227306. Bookseller Inventory # HGT7750SWPARG072214H0015B

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 1.00
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 2.95
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Crace, Jim Author
Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Hardcover First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller
ExtremelyReliable
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. 1st. Bookseller Inventory # DADAX0374227306

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 9.00
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

Crace, Jim Author
Published by Farrar Strauss, NY (2003)
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Hardcover First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Crowfly Books
(South Portland, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Farrar Strauss, NY, 2003. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: New. 1st Edition. 16mo - over 5¾ - 6¾" tall. This is a New and Unread copy of the first edition (1st printing). Book. Bookseller Inventory # 035933

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 17.00
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.75
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

Crace, Jim Author
Published by Gordonsville, Virginia, U.S.A.: Farrar Straus & Giroux (2003)
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Hardcover First Edition Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Golden Bridge Books
(Ottawa, ON, Canada)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Gordonsville, Virginia, U.S.A.: Farrar Straus & Giroux, 2003. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: New. 1st Edition. Bookseller Inventory # ABE-1102622250

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 17.00
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 19.95
From Canada to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

5.

Crace, Jim Author
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Golden Bridge Books
(Ottawa, ON, Canada)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Book Condition: New. Ships From Canada. New in new dust jacket. Glued binding. Paper over boards. With dust jacket. 246 p. Audience: General/trade. Bookseller Inventory # 9463257486

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 18.14
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 19.95
From Canada to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

6.

Crace, Jim Author
Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN 10: 0374227306 ISBN 13: 9780374227302
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 2
Seller
Murray Media
(MIAMI SHORES, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # P110374227306

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 59.47
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 1.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds