Top Marketplace offers for ISBN

9780805090901

The Wrecking Crew: How Conservatives Ruined Government, Enriched Themselves, and Beggared the Nation

Frank, Thomas

3.96 avg rating
( 1,444 ratings by GoodReads )
Not the book you're looking for? Search for all books with this author and title
Image Not Available

From the most astute political scoffer since H. L. Mencken, the definitive account of the conservative reign of misrule and corruption

Hailed as a “hunk of dynamite” (Salon) and celebrated for its “satiric wit” (The New York Times Book Review) and “delighted outrage” (The New Republic), The Wrecking Crew supplies the first and—lacking future fact-finding commissions—probably the only full reckoning of what conservatism has wrought.

Casting his eyes from the Bush administration’s final months of plunder to the earliest days of the Republican revolution, Thomas Frank uncovers the deep logic behind the graft and incompetence of conservatives in power. He shows how leaders dedicated to a doctrine of government by entrepreneurship proceeded to sell off the state, channeling the profits to cronies and loyalists. He surveys the federal agencies doomed to failure by the inept and even hostile staff appointed to run them. He charts the practice of wholesale deregulation and the devastating results now clear for all to see. From political scandal to mortgage meltdown, Frank documents the consequences of enshrining the free market as the logic of the state.

As conservatives retreat to lick their wounds and a new administration prepares to undo the years of misgovernment, The Wrecking Crew makes clear the challenges before the nation. A brilliant and audacious stocktaking—now thoroughly revised and updated—this is Frank’s most revelatory work yet.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

Thomas Frank is the author of Pity the Billionaire, The Wrecking Crew, What's the Matter with Kansas?, and One Market Under God. A former opinion columnist for The Wall Street Journal, Frank is the founding editor of The Baffler and a monthly columnist for Harper's. He lives outside Washington, D.C.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Chapter One
Golconda on the Potomac
The richest county in America isn’t in Silicon Valley or some sugarland preserve of Houston’s oil kings; it is Loudoun County, Virginia, a fast-growing suburb of Washington, D.C., that is known for swollen suburban homes and white rail fences of the kind that denote “horse country.” The second richest county is Fairfax, Virginia, the next suburb over from Loudoun; the third, sixth, and seventh richest counties are also suburbs of the capital.1 The Washington area has six different Morton’s steakhouses to choose from, seven BMW dealerships,2 six Ritz-Carlton installations, 3 three luxury lifestyle magazines, and a Capital Beltway that is essentially an all-hours Mercedes speedway. There are malcontents all over America with a ready explanation for why this is so: Washington is rich because those overpaid federal bureaucrats are battening on the hard work of people like us, gorging themselves on the bounty that the IRS extracts out of the vast heartland. In blog and barbershop alike they rail against big government like it’s 1979, moaning about meddling feds and cursing the income tax as a crime against nature.   As a way of explaining the stratospheric prosperity of Washington today, however, this old, familiar plaint makes as much sense as attributing the price of stocks to the coming and going of sunspots. After all, it isn’t FTC paper pushers who buy the six-thousand-square-foot “estate homes” of Loudoun County, and even the highest-ranking members of Congress drool to behold the fine cars and the vacation chateaus of the people sent to lobby them by, say, the pharmaceutical industry.   The reason our barbershop grumblers don’t get it is that their myths don’t account for the swarming, thriving fauna that populates the capital today. Conservative Washington is, by and large, unknown territory. The private offices to which it has delegated the nation’s public business are not included on the tourist’s map. Its monuments are not marked. Its operations are not well understood outside the city. But Washington’s newfound opulence gives us our first clue as to what those operations entail.   Washington is a strange place under any circumstances. If you happen to come here from the urban Midwest, as I did, the city seems alien and hopelessly unreal. The blue-collar workers who make up a good portion of the population elsewhere in America are a minority in Washington, with lawyers outnumbering machinists, to choose one example, by a factor of twenty-seven to one. There are few rusting factories or empty warehouses in Washington—and few busy factories or well-stocked warehouses either. The largest manufacturing outfit in town, at least as of the early 1980s, was the Government Printing Of.ce.4 The neighborhood taverns one finds on nearly every street corner in Chicago are almost completely absent, as are the three-.flats that house much of that midwestern metropolis.   While the capital has desperately poor people in abundance, members of the political class have almost no reason to mingle with them. If you stay within the boundaries of the federal colony, you will meet only people like your tidy white-collar self: college graduates wearing ID badges and speaking correct American English. In one residential neighborhood I visited, a full 50 percent of the adult population possess advanced degrees.   The city is a perfect realization of the upper-bracket dream of a white-collar universe, where economies run on the information juggling of the “creative class” and where manufacturing is something done by .filthy brutes in far-off lands. In the hard-hit heartland this fantasy seems so risible as to not require attention. In Washington and its suburbs, however—where there are hundreds of corporate offices but little manufacturing—it is thought to be such an apt description of reality, such a pearly pearl of wisdom, that the city’s big thinkers return to it again and again. The malls and offices and housing developments of northern Virginia so overwhelmed Joel Garreau, the man on the “cultural revolution” beat at the Washington Post, that in describing them he slipped into the past-tense profundo: the region’s “privateenterprise, high-information, high-education, post-Industrial Revolution economy,” he raved in 1991, “made it a model of what American urban areas would be in the twenty-.first century.”5   Washington has boomed before, and it’s even been proclaimed a model for the world before—most famously during the thirties and forties, when the federal government looked like the savior of the nation and maybe even of the planet. The city was occupied then by an army of “New Dealers” who were talented, idealistic about the possibilities of government, and young—far younger than the gray old gentlemen who had previously run the place. Today we naturally think of Washington as a young person’s town, thanks to all the fresh-faced interns and aides and paralegals who fill its offices. But in the thirties this was a novel development, made possible by the stock market crash and the Depression, which closed other doors and utterly destroyed the traditional American faith in limited government and benevolent business.   Disabused of the old myths, and unable to get a job, the class of 1933 went to Washington instead of Wall Street. They lived in group houses, drank hard, and threw themselves into building the new regulatory state. It’s not a calling that anyone associates with glamour anymore, but excitement and high patriotism are constant themes in the literature of the New Deal period. One account from 1935, for example, described the city’s “mood of adventure, the exhilaration of exciting living which the humblest office-holders share with the Brain Trust [the president’s close advisers] as co-workers in the great experimental laboratory set up in their city.”6 The stories of that period always seemed to follow the same pattern: how the bright young man arrived in the city, fresh from law school, where he was put to work immediately on business of the utmost urgency; how he went for days without sleep; how he marveled at the awesome abilities of the people the administration had brought to Washington. I know of none in which the young man came to Washington to get rich. When the New Dealers grew older, of course, they found ample opportunity to pile up the coin, often by guiding business interests through the bureaucracies that they themselves had created.7 But in those early years, when business had failed so spectacularly and when the country looked desperately to Washington for relief, public service became the object of a sort of cult.8   Liberalism was something strong and bold in those days, and making government work was at the very heart of it. This was the period when the United States developed a first-rate bureaucracy, and the famous law professor Felix Frankfurter attributed its appearance to the epochal migration of idealistic youth to the capital (a movement for which Frankfurter was partially responsible). “The ablest of them—in striking contrast to what was true thirty years ago—are eager for service in government,” he wrote in 1936. “They find satisfaction in work which aims at the public good and which presents problems that challenge the best ability and courage of man.”9   Like all historical myths, the legend of the capable and selfless New Dealer is surely overdrawn. Even so, there were in those years enough genuine cases of honest public service delivered despite peril to the public servant’s career to make the thirties and forties truly seem like some kind of bureaucratic golden age. The chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority, for example, provoked the berserk, undying hostility of the senior senator from Tennessee by refusing to allow this worthy to pack the TVA with cronies and patronage hacks. The head of the Office of Price Administration, responsible for wartime rationing, fended off not only the spoilsmen of Congress but the profiteers of the private sector, earning the enmity of senators and industrialists alike. And when Franklin D. Roosevelt’s nominee for chairman of the Federal Reserve was informed that the private sector would agree to his appointment if he would abandon his liberalism, he responded, “You can tell your banker friends to go to hell.”10   True, Washington crawled with millionaires back then, just as it does today. There was a critical difference, however: in those days the millions almost always came from somewhere else. At the turn of the twentieth century, in the golden age of unregulated capitalism, the masters of the great fortunes had found it amusing to settle down among the diplomats and statesmen of the federal city, and so Massachusetts Avenue came to be lined with the grand palazzos of people who had made their pile—or, more accurately, whose parents had made their pile—in mining or manufacturing or railroads or steel or breakfast cereal. Occasionally these nabobs went in for politics themselves: A 1905 novel by David Graham Phillips is set in “one of the very .nest of the houses that have been building since rich men began to buy into the Senate and Cabinet.” But by the thirties their days in public service had ended. Now these patricians spent their time throwing dinner parties for ambassadors, publishing newspapers, settling back into comfortable alcoholic delirium, and, of course, raging against the New Dealers who had supplanted them.11   “Never before have such vast numbers of officials swarmed to the capital, and never b...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Holt Paperbacks (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Softcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Book Deals
(Lewiston, NY, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Holt Paperbacks, 2009. Book Condition: New. Brand New, Unread Copy in Perfect Condition. A+ Customer Service! Summary: "A no-holds-barred exegesis on the naked cynicism of conservatism in America."Kirkus Reviews, starred review "Written with barbed wit and finely controlled anger, he skewers such juicy targets as libertarian strategist Grover Norquist and Michelle Malkin."Publishers Weekly, starred review"Glorious. Often brilliant. Frank's gloom is leavened by an eye for the unexpected and the absurd."Los Angeles Times "Well-researched and witty. Provides a powerful liberal antidote to the high-volume rantings of Bill O'Reilly, Ann Coulter and Fox News."Seattle Post-Intelligencer"Frank's gifts as a social observer are on display. His analysis of why there are so many libertarian think tanks in a country with so few libertarians is dead on. In Thomas Frank, the American left has found its own Juvenal."The New York Times Book Review"Frank offers one damning anecdote after another.The Wrecking Crewexplains how cynical conservatives have wrested control of the government by railing against its very existence, all while using federal perches to funnel billions into the pockets of lobbyists and the corporations they represent."Time"Thomas Frank is back with another hunk of dynamite.The Wrecking Crewshould monopolize political conversation this year. It's the first book to effectively tie the ruin and corruption of conservative governance to the conservative "movement building" of the 1970s, and, before that, the business crusade against good government going back at least to the 1890s."Salon.com"Tom Frank has hold of something real.The Wrecking Crewcan be good, spirited fun. Frank captures a quality of exuberant bullying in those of his conservative subjects he knows well enough to identify individually, rather than categorically."The New Yorker"Frank's sentences inhale and unfurl with a wit and verve."The New York Observer"Conservatives in office have made their share of blunders and mistakes, and Frank is at his finest in depicting some of the stunning instances of hypocrisy and idiocy in the period of Republican rule."The New York Post"Smart, thoroughly researched, and written with wit and panache."The Wichita Eagle"A welcome read. There is no doubt that Frank is helping to restore the journalistic and literary standards to political books. Elegant.The Wrecking Crewhas the rhetorical power to illustrate the dire consequences of a government sold off piece by piece to the highest bidder. One finishes the book feeling as if one's political vision has been brought into focus."The Courier-Journal"A superb follow-up toWhat's The Matter with Kansas'. Thorough reporting and incisive historical analysis. With genuine outrange and blasts of polemic, but Frank never allowsThe Wrecking Crewto become just another seething right- or left-wing political tract preaching to the choir."The Oregonian"Frank brings invaluable insider perceptions, ardor, and precision to his lancing inquiry into the erosion of democracy and the enshrinement of the mighty dollar. An electrifying, well-researched analysis of 'conservatism-as-profiteering.' This staggering history of systematic greed with inject new energy into public discourse as a historical election looms."Booklist(starred review). Bookseller Inventory # ABE_book_new_0805090908

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 10.29
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Frank, Thomas Author
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
AMAZINGBOOKDEALS
(IRVING, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Paperback. Book Condition: BRAND NEW. BRAND NEW. Fast Shipping. Prompt Customer Service. Satisfaction guaranteed. Bookseller Inventory # 0805090908BNA

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 6.32
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

Frank, Thomas Author
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 5
Seller
Bookoutlet1
(bridgeton, NJ, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Paperback. Book Condition: New. Book is in great shape- may have a remainder mark SHIPS DIRECTLY FROM AMAZON. Bookseller Inventory # 39B0000085T9

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 7.25
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Henry Holt and Co (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Paperbackshop-US
(Secaucus, NJ, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Henry Holt and Co, 2009. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # KS-9780805090901

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 8.18
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

5.

Frank, Thomas Author
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Castle Rock
(Pittsford, NY, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Book Condition: Brand New. Book Condition: Brand New. Bookseller Inventory # 97808050909011.0

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 8.64
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

6.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Holt Paperbacks (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
ExtremelyReliable
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Holt Paperbacks, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 1 Reprint. Bookseller Inventory # DADAX0805090908

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 9.83
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

7.

Frank, Thomas Author
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: > 20
Seller
BargainBookStores
(Grand Rapids, MI, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # 869907

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 9.95
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

8.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Henry Holt Company, United States (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
The Book Depository US
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Henry Holt Company, United States, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reprint. 203 x 132 mm. Language: English Brand New Book. From the author of the landmark bestseller What s the Matter with Kansas? comes a jaw-dropping investigation of the decades of deliberate--and lucrative--conservative misrule. Bookseller Inventory # AAS9780805090901

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 14.15
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

9.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Henry Holt Company, United States (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Henry Holt Company, United States, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reprint. 203 x 132 mm. Language: English Brand New Book. From the author of the landmark bestseller What s the Matter with Kansas? comes a jaw-dropping investigation of the decades of deliberate--and lucrative--conservative misrule. Bookseller Inventory # AAS9780805090901

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 14.57
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

10.

Frank, Thomas Author
Published by Holt Paperbacks (2009)
ISBN 10: 0805090908 ISBN 13: 9780805090901
New Paperback Quantity Available: 20
Seller
Murray Media
(MIAMI SHORES, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Holt Paperbacks, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # 0805090908

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 13.95
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 0.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

There are more copies of this book

View all search results for this book