Tan, Amy Saving Fish From Drowning

ISBN 13: 9780007232116

Saving Fish From Drowning

3.41 avg rating
( 25,445 ratings by GoodReads )
 
9780007232116: Saving Fish From Drowning

This is the highly-anticipated new novel from the best-selling author of "The Joy Luck Club" and "The Bonesetter's Daughter". On an ill-fated art expedition of the Southern Shan State in Burma, eleven Americans leave their Floating Island Resort for a Christmas morning tour - and disappear. Through the twists of fate, curses, and just plain human error, they find themselves deep in the Burma jungle, where they encounter a tribe awaiting the return of the leader and the mythical book of wisdom that will protect them from the ravages and destruction of the Myanmar military regime. 'Filled with Amy Tan's signature 'idiosyncratic, sympathetic characters, haunting images, historical complexity, significant contemporary themes, and suspenseful mystery' ("Los Angeles Times"), "Saving Fish from Drowning" seduces the reader with a facade of Buddhist illusions, magical tricks, and light comedy, even as the absurd and picaresque spiral into a gripping morality tale about the consequences of intentions - both good and bad - and of the shared responsibility that individuals must accept for the actions of others.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Review:

Amy Tan, who has an unerring eye for relationships between mothers and daughters, especially Chinese-American, has departed from her well-known genre in Saving Fish From Drowning. She would be well advised to revisit that theme which she writes about so well.

The title of the book is derived from the practice of Myanmar fishermen who "scoop up the fish and bring them to shore. They say they are saving the fish from drowning. Unfortunately... the fish do not recover," This kind of magical thinking or hypocrisy or mystical attitude or sheer stupidity is a fair metaphor for the entire book. It may be read as a satire, a political statement, a picaresque tale with several "picaros" or simply a story about a tour gone wrong.

Bibi Chen, San Francisco socialite and art vendor to the stars, plans to lead a trip for 12 friends: "My friends, those lovers of art, most of them rich, intelligent, and spoiled, would spend a week in China and arrive in Burma on Christmas Day." Unfortunately, Bibi dies, in very strange circumstances, before the tour begins. After wrangling about it, the group decides to go after all. The leader they choose is indecisive and epileptic, a dangerous combo. Bibi goes along as the disembodied voice-over.

Once in Myanmar, finally, they are noticed by a group of Karen tribesmen who decide that Rupert, the 15-year-old son of a bamboo grower is, in fact, Younger White Brother, or The Lord of the Nats. He can do card tricks and is carrying a Stephen King paperback. These are adjudged to be signs of his deity and ability to save them from marauding soldiers. The group is "kidnapped," although they think they are setting out for a Christmas Day surprise, and taken deep into the jungle where they languish, develop malaria, learn to eat slimy things and wait to be rescued. Nats are "believed to be the spirits of nature--the lake, the trees, the mountains, the snakes and birds. They were numberless ... They were everywhere, as were bad luck and the need to find reasons for it." Philosophy or cynicism? This elusive point of view is found throughout the novel--a bald statement is made and then Tan pulls her punches as if she is unwilling to make a statement that might set a more serious tone.

There are some goofy parts about Harry, the member of the group who is left behind, and his encounter with two newswomen from Global News Network, some slapstick sex scenes and a great deal of dog-loving dialogue. These all contribute to a novel that is silly but not really funny, could have an occasionally serious theme which suddenly disappears, and is about a group of stereotypical characters that it's hard to care about. It was time for Amy Tan to write another book; too bad this was it. --Valerie Ryan

About the Author:

Amy Tan is the author of 'The Joy Luck Club', 'The Kitchen God's Wife', 'The Hundred Secret Senses', 'The Bonesetter's Daughter', 'The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life', and two children's books, 'The Moon Lady' and 'The Chinese Siamese Cat'. Tan was also a co-producer and co-screenwriter of the film version of 'The Joy Luck Club', and her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. Her work has been translated into more than thirty-six languages. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Tan, Amy
Published by HarperPerennial (2006)
ISBN 10: 000723211X ISBN 13: 9780007232116
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description HarperPerennial, 2006. Paperback. Book Condition: New. book. Bookseller Inventory # 000723211X

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 99.18
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds