The story of Chicken Licken (A New View)

 
9780021790203: The story of Chicken Licken (A New View)

Reading Together is a learn-to-read series of picture books for young children and parents to enjoy together. There are four levels, each consisting of six books, offering a variety of reading experiences: stories, poems, rhymes and songs, traditional tales and information books.

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From School Library Journal:

PreSchool-K Ormerod's World-Mother-Goose-Theater-treatment of The Story of Chicken Licken is a little disappointing. She presents the old story as a class (perhaps kindergarten) play: the narrator dressed in a top hat and bow tie, all of the bird costumes obviously put together from old clothes and cardboard-and-construction-paper masks. Ormerod's reporting of this ritual of childhood is the book's most appealing feature. Each double page is designed so that three-fifths of the horizontal spread is on the stage and two-fifths is the audience (with a baby carrier in the foreground). Readers view the book as if watching from the back of the theater (or gym), so they view three arenas in each spread: the baby (who eventually climbs up on the stage) in the foreground, the backs of the audience in silhouette and the action on stage. All three focuses are story lines in themselvesthere is just too much going on. Having one's eye drawn in so many directions, it is difficult to give any attention to the text, and the story loses any sort of the momentum so necessary in a cumulative tale such as "Chicken Licken." In the end, the telling of the story becomes merely a fragmented part of the work. It's not a good version of the story, and it's not good Jan Ormerod, either. There is a neither here nor thereness about the book that makes one wonder just what to do with it. Christina Olson, Beverly Hills Public Library
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Publishers Weekly:

In the shadows of an audience of parents, engrossed in a production of Chicken Licken that's taking place on stage, a baby crawls out of its carrier and makes a break for the spotlight. This is but one of the many subplots that takes place in Ormerod's distinctly original version of the classic story. A freckle-faced young narrator solemnly orates most of the action, while children speak the words of Henny Penny, Cock Lock, Drake Lake and quick-witted Foxy Woxy. The parents, in silhouette, seem to enjoy the showexcept for one bearded man who falls asleep, and one of the performer's fidgety younger brothers, who gets shushed periodically by his mother. But the baby, both in the book and on stage, steals the show, climbing into the light just in time to give the lulled audience a big laugh. Children will laugh, too, as they flip the pages back and forth, observing different audience members at different points in the play. With her usual gift for subtlety, Ormerod has given readers a chance to view Chicken Licken and the rest of the gang in a newand very funnylight.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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