Consequences of Love

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9780099521143: Consequences of Love

It is summer in Jeddah but Naser's life seems bleak. An immigrant in an unfriendly land, his friends have fled town for cooler climes and left him to his dead-end job and the scrutiny of the religious police, who keep watch through the shaded windows of their government jeeps. He spends his time writing to his mother in Africa and yearning to meet a woman - but in a country that separates men and women with walls and veils he feels increasingly trapped. Then, one of the black-clad women drops a piece of paper at his feet, instructing him to follow her pink shoes and suddenly his black-and-white life blooms into colour. But relationships between unmarried men and women are illegal under the strict Wahhibism of Saudi state rule - and it's not long before their forbidden love must face the hardest test of all...

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About the Author:

Sulaiman S.M.Y. Addonia was born in Eritrea to an Eritrean mother and an Ethiopian father. He spent his early life in a refugee camp in Sudan following the Om Hajar massacre in 1976, and in his early teens he lived and studied in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He has lived in London since 1990. The Consequences of Love is his first novel.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

The evening of the second Friday in July was an evening of departures. It was 1989 and Jeddah was about to be abandoned by all of those who could afford a holiday. I had left my window open to let the humid breeze into my room. I breathed in the spicy kebsa meat mixed with the spice of men’s cologne; the smells of the day turning into night.

The phone was ringing. After six rings I picked up. It was Jasim. He wanted me to come to the café to say goodbye. He was off to Paris the following day. He regularly traveled abroad and always came back from his trips with presents; he claimed they would encourage sensuality in those he loved.

He also said that I needed to collect the latest of my letters to my mother. I had tried many times to send letters home but they were always returned to sender. I had used Jasim’s café as my return address ever since I had known him.

at that time I lived in a tiny apartment in a small two-story building. It was all I could afford, given that I was earning just four hundred rials a month at the car wash. The apartment was at the poor end of a long street that swelled at the middle, like a man with a big belly and long thin legs. At the rotary it was surrounded by shops and restaurants, before it stretched thin again all the way to Kharentina.

By day, its rows of white-painted buildings glistened under the sun and men in white thobes outnumbered women in black abayas. The scene made you feel like you were in an old black-and-white movie.

I walked past the villas, where the breeze had turned the garden trees into slow-moving ballerinas. Peering down Al-Nuzla Street, I could see the tallest building of our neighborhood. It stood out because of its nine floors and was well-known for the rich people who lived in it.

In front of me, on the pavement, two young men were strolling, holding each other’s hands. They made their way into the Yemeni shop. A few moments later I stopped to let a man pass, dressed in jallabiyah and tagiyah and carrying a box full of plastic Pepsi bottles. I tucked my T-shirt into my tracksuit and continued.

The fragrance of musk filled my nostrils. It meant I was getting close to the biggest mosque in the neighborhood. At one time I had been living with my uncle right next to the mosque; my new home was a few blocks away on the same street, but this mosque was still the closest.

I saw a group of six bearded men standing outside. They stood so close to one another that they looked like they were joined at the hips and shoulders.

They stepped aside to give way to the blind imam who was leaving the mosque. It was because of him that I no longer attended prayers. He was clutching the arm of a tall man who was holding a black leather bag. Their long beards quivered softly in the wind.

I quickly crossed the road and bowed my head as I started to walk in the opposite direction to where they were heading.

Then suddenly, a familiar Jeep with shaded windows swerved toward me and screeched to a halt. I froze. Religious police. I wanted to run but my legs felt heavy. Three bearded men jumped out and came toward me. I couldn’t move an inch. But they passed and entered the building behind me.

Seconds later, they came out of the building with Muhssin. Although I had never spoken to him, I recognized him from school. Muhssin was unmistakable—he modeled his look on the romantic style of Omar Sharif, the Egyptian actor from the sixties. I pulled myself back to the wall. Muhssin’s mother followed them, weeping, begging them to spare her son for the sake of Allah.

“Please forgive him, he is my only son, my only breadwinner. Allah is merciful. Allah is love.” The religious policemen shoved Muhssin into their Jeep and turned to his mother.

One of them brandished a stick and ran toward her, yelling, “Go inside and cover your face, may Allah curse you.” He hit her on the back and buttocks as he herded her inside the building.

A moment later the Jeep sped off toward Mecca Street. I hurried into the building to find Um Muhssin. Through the small windowpane, I could see that she was sitting on the staircase weeping. Her hand was shaking when she tried to get up. I knocked on the door but she didn’t look up.

When i reached the junction of Al-Nuzla and Mecca streets I paused to consider my route. I didn’t want to pass Abu Faisal’s villa and face the possibility of a chance meeting with Jeddah’s most prominent executioner. He was the father of Faisal, my school friend; but when I looked down the road and saw the white Cadillac parked outside his house, I immediately went the other way.

Jasim greeted me, a smile decorating his face. His trimmed goatee curled upward, accentuating his grin. He was wearing Saudi dress, with the sleeves rolled up, his hairy forearms resting on the counter.

Some of the customers craned their necks to look at me. The smell of shisha—smoky, sweet—was gradually overlaid with the smell of hot coffee prepared with plenty of cardamom. Jasim was busy, so I sat down and waited.

I scanned the room and got a glimpse of the new waiter. He was young and agile and he glided through the tight spaces between tables as if his lower half were made of jelly. He squeezed past me and I watched as other customers reached out to touch him. He brushed aside their hands as though they were soft curtains.

The tables were deliberately close together: Jasim wanted men to rub against one another and produce a fire. “There is nothing sweeter than seeing two men caressing each other with their bodies,” he once told me. “It makes me imagine that flames of love might be created.”

Back then, I hadn’t understood. “But if the men think for a second that they are touching each other for any other reason than lack of space, then surely they will burn down the café?”

Jasim shrugged his shoulders and laughed.

Jasim’s café was full of color. And his obsession with color coordination extended from the walls to the tablecloths, to what the boy was wearing.

The walls were painted in two sections. The top half was a misty rose, and the bottom half, with sporadic wildflowers sketched by Jasim, was a warm gray.

At the table always reserved for Fawwaz and his cronies—their whispers muffled by their thick mustaches—the boy stretched across to clear the small coffee cups. He put the cups on a tray and sped to the farthest corner of the room to seek the shelter of an air conditioner. He stood facing the wall and he slowly circled his head as he lifted the hem of his thobe to wipe his face. I could see his tight beige velvet trousers contrasting perfectly with the blue tablecloth next to him.

The men were setting up a game of dominoes. Fawwaz placed his chin on his hand and peered at the boy. His stern expression could not hide the lust in his eyes. He leapt to his feet and went toward the boy.

Fawwaz stood in front of the boy and held his hand. I stared through them. Memories were starting to come back to me from my time as a waiter.

Jasim was sitting at the table with Omar, one of his closest friends. I loved those early smoke-free hours of the morning, when the café was quiet and the warm colors of the walls wrapped you like a silk robe.

I was polishing the counter while listening to an interview that my kafeel—the Blessed Bader Ibn Abd-Allah—was giving on the radio. He was a police chief in the Jeddah region and he was talking about young people and morality. He suddenly broke off from the calm one-to-one chat with the interviewer and steered into a sermon, quoting from the Qur’an and the Prophet’s sayings to warn youth against malevolent behavior. “But,” the kafeel said, “we are working together with the religious police to combat immoral behavior. InshaAllah, Allah will bless our important work.”

I shut off the radio, went to the kitchen, and lit a piece of charcoal. Holding it with the clamps, I brought it over to Jasim’s table and placed the burning coal on the edge of the clay bowl. I pulled up a chair and sat down. Jasim passed me the pipe. I put the mouthpiece on my lips and as I inhaled I moved the charcoal around using the clamps. Omar was talking about a local controversy: A teenage boy had been arrested by the religious police for receiving a note from a girl while walking to school one morning.

“To my knowledge,” said Omar, pinching his left cheek as he talked, “it is mostly princesses and rich girls who go around and toss notes at boys’ feet. They do it for fun and to ease their boredom. Then when they have had enough these girls disappear back to their hidden world as quickly as they came, leaving behind heartbroken boys.”

“So how come I never had notes dropped at my feet?” asked Jasim.

“Well,” said Omar, “I am telling you that these are rich girls and princesses, and they have a fine taste.”

Jasim stood up, surrounded by smoke, and shouted, pretending to be offended, “Are you saying I am not a handsome man?”

Omar laughed and pulled Jasim down. “Just sit. You know you’re not. Plus, you’re smart, and smart people don’t risk the consequences.”

I was woken from my reverie when Jasim called my name. I looked up. He indicated that I should join him at the counter.

“I am going to miss you but you will get a great present from Paris,” he announced as he kissed me on both cheeks. His eyes were bloodshot, streaks of red crossing the whites of his eyes.

“Don’t you ever get tired of traveling?”

He thought for a moment and shook his head, giggling.

“How long are you going for?”

“Shush,” he said, “you are like a fire-breather. You burn me with what you say.”

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Book Description Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 198 x 129 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. It is summer in Jeddah but Naser s life seems bleak. An immigrant in an unfriendly land, his friends have fled town for cooler climes and left him to his dead-end job and the scrutiny of the religious police, who keep watch through the shaded windows of their government jeeps. He spends his time writing to his mother in Africa and yearning to meet a woman - but in a country that separates men and women with walls and veils he feels increasingly trapped. Then, one of the black-clad women drops a piece of paper at his feet, instructing him to follow her pink shoes and suddenly his black-and-white life blooms into colour. But relationships between unmarried men and women are illegal under the strict Wahhibism of Saudi state rule - and it s not long before their forbidden love must face the hardest test of all. Bookseller Inventory # AAZ9780099521143

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Book Description Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom, 2009. Paperback. Book Condition: New. 198 x 129 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. It is summer in Jeddah but Naser s life seems bleak. An immigrant in an unfriendly land, his friends have fled town for cooler climes and left him to his dead-end job and the scrutiny of the religious police, who keep watch through the shaded windows of their government jeeps. He spends his time writing to his mother in Africa and yearning to meet a woman - but in a country that separates men and women with walls and veils he feels increasingly trapped. Then, one of the black-clad women drops a piece of paper at his feet, instructing him to follow her pink shoes and suddenly his black-and-white life blooms into colour. But relationships between unmarried men and women are illegal under the strict Wahhibism of Saudi state rule - and it s not long before their forbidden love must face the hardest test of all. Bookseller Inventory # AAZ9780099521143

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Book Description Vintage Publishing. Paperback. Book Condition: new. BRAND NEW, The Consequences of Love, Sulaiman Addonia, It is summer in Jeddah but Naser's life seems bleak. An immigrant in an unfriendly land, his friends have fled town for cooler climes and left him to his dead-end job and the scrutiny of the religious police, who keep watch through the shaded windows of their government jeeps. He spends his time writing to his mother in Africa and yearning to meet a woman - but in a country that separates men and women with walls and veils he feels increasingly trapped. Then, one of the black-clad women drops a piece of paper at his feet, instructing him to follow her pink shoes and suddenly his black-and-white life blooms into colour. But relationships between unmarried men and women are illegal under the strict Wahhibism of Saudi state rule - and it's not long before their forbidden love must face the hardest test of all. Bookseller Inventory # B9780099521143

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Book Description Vintage, 2009. Book Condition: New. Under the hot sun, the Jeddah streets make a scene from an old black-and-white movie: the women dressed like long, dark shadows and the men in their light cotton tunics. Naser's friends have all left town for cooler climes but he can't get away: he's an outsider in Saudi and he needs to hold down his job at the local carwash. Num Pages: 352 pages. BIC Classification: FA. Category: (G) General (US: Trade). Dimension: 198 x 129 x 22. Weight in Grams: 252. . 2009. Paperback. . . . . Bookseller Inventory # V9780099521143

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Book Description Vintage. Book Condition: New. Under the hot sun, the Jeddah streets make a scene from an old black-and-white movie: the women dressed like long, dark shadows and the men in their light cotton tunics. Naser's friends have all left town for cooler climes but he can't get away: he's an outsider in Saudi and he needs to hold down his job at the local carwash. Num Pages: 352 pages. BIC Classification: FA. Category: (G) General (US: Trade). Dimension: 198 x 129 x 22. Weight in Grams: 252. . 2009. Paperback. . . . . Bookseller Inventory # V9780099521143

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