Politics & Government American Government

ISBN 13: 9780130882417

American Government

4 avg rating
( 1 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780130882417: American Government

Prentice Hall's exclusive Companion Website that accompanies American Government, Ninth Edition offers unique tools and support that make it easy for students and instructors to integrate this online study guide with the text. The site is a comprehensive resource that is organized according to the chapters within the text and features a variety of learning and teaching modules:FOR STUDENTS: Study Guide Modules contain a variety of exercises and features designed to help students with self-study including multiple choice, fill in the blank, true/false, and essay practice tests. Students also have access to a wealth of material that helps them research and write papers for their political science classes, find internships and careers in political science, and locate their own state's web resources. Survey Module allows students to see how their political opinions stack up against others across the county. Reference Modules include features such as Election 2000, Connect with Politics, Documents on Line, and Net Search options that provide the opportunity to quickly reach information on the Web that relates to the content in the text. Communication Modules include tools such as Live chat and Message Boards to facilitate online collaboration and communication. Personalization Modules include our enhanced Help feature that contains a text page for browsers and plug-ins. FOR INSTRUCTORS: Faculty Resources give faculty the ability to download art from the book for creating Power Point slides in addition to Lecture notes and strategies for teaching American government. Syllabus Manager tool provides an easy-to-follow process for creating, posting, and revising a syllabus online that is accessible from any point within the Companion Website . This resource allows instructors and students to communicate both inside and outside of the classroom at the click of a button. The Companion Website makes integrating the Internet into your course exciting and easy. Join us online at the address above and enter a new world of teaching and learning possibilities and opportunities.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

From the Publisher:

A concise approach to the basics of American Government.

From the Inside Flap:

PREFACE It was the beginning of a new century and a new millennium. I was working on the revisions of the ninth edition of this textbook on American government. My thoughts turned to the political system of the United States one hundred years ago. How did it compare with the system that operated at the start of the twenty-first century? Had we improved American democracy in the past hundred years? A detailed examination of these questions would require the production of a book-length manuscript and I was faced with publishing deadlines for this volume. But I have put together a few thoughts on the state of American democracy then and now. My overall conclusion is that despite some weaknesses in our present system, our political system is markedly improved and far more democratic today than it was a hundred years ago. Consider the following facts. In 1900, African-Americans in the South lived in a segregated society. Separation of the races existed in both the private and public spheres. Private companies and individuals were free to discriminate and government laws required racial segregation in all public facilities from schools and parks to bathrooms and drinking fountains. The entire system of segregation was given, legal sanction by the 1896 decision of the United States Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson. This case held that government could require the separation of the races so long as the facilities provided to each group were equal. In reality, "separate but equal" meant separation but not equality for black Americans. It was only with the 1954 Supreme Court case of Brown v. Board of Education and the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that racial segregation was gradually brought to an end in this country. Voting rights in the United States were also restricted in 1900. Despite the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution that protected African-Americans from being denied the right to vote because of their race, very few voted in the American South. Devious legal schemes, intimidation, and violence kept most African-Americans from voting in this region of the nation. It was not until after the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that blacks were freely able to vote in the South. Similarly, few women voted in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century. Although women had been granted the right to vote in a number of states, no constitutional provision existed to bar the states from denying them the right to vote. That changed in 1920 with the adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment. In the decades since this change occurred, more and more women have begun to participate in American elections. Indeed, in recent presidential elections, more women have actually voted than men. In 1900, United States Senators were chosen by the state legislatures. Most often this meant that a few influential state political leaders made these important decisions. In 1913, the Seventeenth Amendment to the Constitution was adopted making United States Senators popularly elected by the voters in each state. Finally, in 1900, there was little in the way of social legislation to protect Americans when they become unemployed, disabled, ill, or when they retired. They were forced to depend on relatives or on charity provided by churches other private organizations. The country did not even have child labor laws to protect children from working long hours in factories and mines. Although some European countries had established social security systems by 1900—Germany, for example—it was not until 1935 that the United States adopted legislation that established a social security retirement system. Later in the same decade, Congress also enacted laws that established the maximum number of hours a person could work each week, created a minimum wage, outlawed child labor, and formulated a program of unemployment insurance. And it was not until the 1960s that Congress passed legislation that provided government programs of medical care for the elderly and the poor. The fact that in the twentieth century the United States eliminated much of the blight of racial and gender discrimination and created a safety net of social legislation does not mean that we have solved all of our problems. Much remains to be done to eliminate the remaining traces of discrimination in our society. Further, perhaps thirty percent of the people living in the United States do not have any medical insurance. We are a rich nation that should be able to provide health protection for all of our citizens. To enumerate two problems—discrimination and the lack of medical insurance for many people—that have not yet been solved, is not to suggest that there are no other difficulties confronting the nation in this new century. The widening economic gap between rich and poor that exists in the United States today is not a healthy condition for our democracy. Nor is the present campaign finance system that permits wealthy individuals, corporations, and unions to spend large sums of money on national elections. Other shortcomings in our society exist that have not yet been identified. Their discovery is the work of coming generations, including the generation that is currently attending America's colleges and universities. In writing each edition of this textbook I have always attempted to keep students in the forefront of my thinking. It has been my goal to write a book that is both readable and interesting to undergraduates. Without these qualities, there is small hope that its readers will develop a concern for this nation's governmental system and its public problems. Although I have attempted to interest students in American government, I have never been willing to lower the intellectual level of the book below what I believe to be appropriate for an introductory college level course. I would like to thank Professor Cynthia A. Roberts, a colleague of mine in the Political Science Department of Hunter College, for providing invaluable help to me in the writing of the chapter on foreign affairs. My work has also been aided by the contributions of a number of reviewers who offered suggestions for improving the quality of the book: Thomas Keating, Arizona State University; E. Terrence Jones, University of Missouri-St. Louis; David Steiniche, Missouri Western State College; Robert Ballinger, South Texas Community College; Joanna L. Brigand, Monroe County Community College; Jennifer B. Clark, South Texas Community College; Chris Bourdouvalis, Augusta State University; Steven J. Shone, South Texas Community College; and Ann Kelleher, Pacific Lutheran University. Needless to say, I assume all responsibility for any errors of fact that might be present in this textbook.

Walter E. Volkomer

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Walter E. Volkomer, Walter E. Volkomer (Editor)
Published by Prentice Hall College Div (2000)
ISBN 10: 0130882410 ISBN 13: 9780130882417
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Prentice Hall College Div, 2000. Spiral-bound. Book Condition: New. 9th Sprl. Bookseller Inventory # DADAX0130882410

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 43.98
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

Volkomer Walter E.
Published by Prentice-Hall
ISBN 10: 0130882410 ISBN 13: 9780130882417
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller
Majestic Books
(London, ,, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Prentice-Hall. Book Condition: New. pp. 457. Bookseller Inventory # 58131495

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 63.96
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 7.21
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds