Anthropology

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9780205320240: Anthropology

Provides coverage, currency and connections of the four fields and core concepts through out the text to provide students with the most integrated and contemporary understanding of anthropology available. Overview of the four fields of cultural, biological, physical anthropology and archaeology. Anyone who wishes to gain a better understanding of the interconnection between the four fields of anthropology and access the latest research available in each field.

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From the Back Cover:

“The approach is, on the whole, like a breath of fresh air.”
Ilsa Glazer, Kingsborough Community College

“I really enjoyed reading this textbook...the consistent use of examples from many of the four-fields in each chapter...emphasizes that anthropology is not just cultural or archaeological, but a combination of many different fields in anthropology and that anthropologists in whatever field experience many of the same trials and tribulations in research.”
Leslie Grace Cecil, Baylor University

“Top-notch writers....excellent maps and diagrams!”
Dr. Russell Hamby, Coker College

“I find the Miller/Wood chapters much more satisfying and integrated into an overall holistic approach.”
Dr. James J. Sheehy, Pennsylvania State University

“The text is engaging and frequently prompts critical reflection.”
Kevin Keating, Broward Community College

“It is well written, easy to read, contemporary and engaging. There is a good balance of ideas and examples.”
Raymond A. Bucko, Creighton University

“It does a very good job of introducing anthropology and explaining its relevance to society today.”
Donald Whatley, Blinn College

“I'm very pleased to see that archaeology has been given its own footing here.”
Keith Prufer, Wichita State University

About the Author:

BARBARA D. MILLER

 

Cultural anthropology is exciting because it CONNECTS with everything, from FOOD to ART. And it can help prevent or SOLVE world problems related to social inequality and injustice.

 

Barbara Miller is Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs, and Director of the Culture in Global Affairs (CIGA) Research and Policy Program, at The George Washington University. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Syracuse University in 1978. Before coming to GW in 1994, she taught at the University of Rochester, SUNY Cortland, Ithaca College, Cornell University, and the University of Pittsburgh. For thirty years, Barbara’s research has focused mainly on gender-based inequalities in India, especially the nutritional and medical neglect of daughters in northern regions of the country. In addition, she has conducted research on culture and rural development in Bangladesh, on low-income household dynamics in Jamaica, and on Hindu adolescents in Pittsburgh. Her current interests include continued research on gender inequalities in health in South Asia, the role of cultural anthropology in informing policy issues, and cultural heritage and public policy, especially as related to women, children, and other disenfranchised groups. She teaches courses on introductory cultural anthropology, medical anthropology, development anthropology, culture and population, health and development in South Asia, and migration and mental health. In addition to many journal articles and book chapters, she has published several books: The Endangered Sex: Neglect of Female Children in Rural North India, 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 1997), an edited volume, Sex and Gender Hierarchies (Cambridge University Press, 1993), a co-edited volume with Alf Hiltebeitel, Hair: Its Power and Meaning in Asian Cultures (SUNY Press, 1998), and Cultural Anthropology, 3rd ed. (Allyn & Bacon, 2005).

 

 

 

BERNARD WOOD

 

The BEST THING about science is being able to COLLABORATE with other scientists.

 

Bernard Wood is the Henry R. Luce Professor of Human Origins in the Department of Anthropology at The George Washington University and Adjunct Senior Scientist at the National Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution. He served as founding Director of the Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology at The George Washington University. A medically qualified paleoanthropologist, he practiced briefly as a surgeon before moving into full-time academic life in 1972. He earned a Ph.D. and D.Sc. from The University of London. He has taught at The University of London and The University of Liverpool. In 1995 he was appointed Dean of The University of Liverpool Medical School where he served until moving to Washington in 1997. He teaches a problem-based learning seminar for first-year undergraduates, courses on the fossil evidence for human evolution, evolutionary anatomy, and research methods, as well as teaching anatomy in the GW medical school. In 1968, when a medical student, Bernard joined Richard Leakey’s first expedition to what was then called Lake Rudolf, and he has remained associated with that research group and pursued research in paleoanthropology ever since. His research centers on the reconstruction of human evolutionary history by developing and improving the analysis of the hominid fossil record. A “splitter,” his interests include distinguishing between intraspecific and interspecific variation in order to devise sound

taxonomic hypotheses, refinement of cladistic techniques for the recovery of phylogenetic information, reconstruction of early hominin function such as chewing and locomotion, and exploration of methods for studying the evolution of human growth and development. Bernard’s books include the definitive monograph on the cranial remains from the Koobi Fora site. He regularly publishes journal articles, book reviews, and essays.

 

 

 

ANDREW BALKANSKY

 

Archaeology means I get to PLAY in the DIRT for a LIVING. It’s the next best thing to being a professional baseball player.

 

Andrew Balkansky is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1997. From 1998 to 2002, he was Assistant Professor of Anthropology at The George Washington University, where he taught courses on introductory anthropology, Mesoamerican archaeology, and ethics and intellectual property rights. Among other courses that Andrew teaches in his current position at SIU is an introductory course in four-field anthropology. An anthropological archaeologist, Andrew has been conducting fieldwork in Southern Mexico for the past ten years in order to illuminate the evolution of complex societies. His current field project is the excavation of a site called Tayata that dates between 1300 to 300 BCE, the period immediately prior to the urban revolution and a time about which little is known. His publications include journal articles, chapters and book reviews, and the monograph The Sola Valley and the Monte Albán State: A Study of Zapotec Imperial Expansion, published by the

Museum of Anthropology at the University of Michigan in 2002.

 

 

 

JULIO MERCADER

 

Being an archaeologist means I get to go to the FIELD, gather NEW DATA, and ANALYZE it.

 

Julio Mercader is a Canada Research Chair and Assistant Professor in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Calgary, Canada. He holds a simultaneous appointment as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at The George Washington University and at the Smithsonian Institution. He earned a Ph.D. from Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 1997 and was subsequently awarded a joint postdoctoral research fellowship with The George Washington University and the Smithsonian Institution. His teaching includes courses on African archaeology, hominoid behavior, and European prehistory. He has conducted fieldwork in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, and Mozambique.

Julio’s recent publications include the edited book Under the Canopy: The Archaeology of the Tropical Rain Forests, published by Rutgers University Press in 2003. In 2003, he received a grant from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Canada Research Chairs Program to build the newly created Tropical Archaeology Laboratoy at the University of Calgary, which he directs.

 

 

 

MELISSA PANGER

 

Being a primatologist gives me opportunities to TRAVEL, do RESEARCH with fascinating animals, get to KNOW people in different cultures, and help preserve

endangered primate species.

 

Melissa Panger is a wildlife biologist in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and holds a simultaneous appointment as Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology at The George Washington University. She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1997. From 2000 to 2003, she was an NSF IGERT postdoctoral research fellow with the Hominid Paleobiology Program at The George Washington University. During much of that period, she was also Assistant Professorial Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology and taught courses on primatology and biological anthropology. She has conducted field research on nonhuman primates in Côte d’Ivoire, Panama, Costa Rica, and Florida. Melissa is the recipient of many grants and scholarships, and she has published wide...

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Miller, Barbara D., Wood, Bernard, Balka
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