The Journal of William Jefferay, Gentleman; Born at Chiddingly, Old England 1591 Died at Newport, New England 1675. Being Some Account of Divers ... in New England. a Diary That Might Have Been

 
9780217045292: The Journal of William Jefferay, Gentleman; Born at Chiddingly, Old England 1591 Died at Newport, New England 1675. Being Some Account of Divers ... in New England. a Diary That Might Have Been

This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1899. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... THE JOURNAL OF WILLIAM JEFFERAY, GENTLEMAN. 1591-1623. In Old England (chiddingly--Cambridge-- London). I was born at Chiddingly Manor (The Peaks, as we do call it), in the county of Sussex, in the year 1591; near an hundred years after the discovery of that great America, but much before settlement of the sheltered corner wherein I finally abode. My father's family had long been seated at Chiddingly, and were ever a respectable, welldoing and well-deserving race, as I have heard ancient people say, and do verily believe it so. My father's name was William Jefferay, and my grandfather, Thomas Jefferay, was cousin to that Sir John Jefferay, knight, some time Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, who lies buried with others of the name in Chiddingly church. (Sir John died May 28th, 1570. He did build a goodly house, since called The Place.) My mother was Audry, daughter of Thomas Harvey, of London, whose brother, my great-uncle, was Clarenceux. I had but one brother, Thomas, and seven sisters, Jone, Audry, Susan, Alice, Mary, Elizabeth, and Ann, all of them well married, as the saying is. I was born in a fair^ountry, of which more anon, and to a fair estate, and have bethought me often, in some straits and hardships across the sea, why I left so much to gain so little. Yet one gain I made that was worth all, and more, of my trials, for it was there I found the best wife man ever had; so, if all be considered, I am well content. I have said the country about Chiddingly was fair to look upon, and indeed one might travel far to find its match. From any part of the parish there is a goodly view of the South Downs; the woods are plentiful, and the soil runneth from sand to clay in about equal division, which, with a good protection from the north winds, maketh bo...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want