The Paris Review Book: of Heartbreak, Madness, Sex, Love, Betrayal, Outsiders, Intoxication, War, Whimsy, Horrors, God, Death, Dinner, Baseball, ... and Everything Else in the World Since 1953

4.23 avg rating
( 349 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780312422394: The Paris Review Book: of Heartbreak, Madness, Sex, Love, Betrayal, Outsiders, Intoxication, War, Whimsy, Horrors, God, Death, Dinner, Baseball, ... and Everything Else in the World Since 1953

For a half-century, The Paris Review has published writing and interviews from the world's most brilliant authors. To commemorate the anniversary, a breathtakingly diverse and illuminating anthology has been assembled. The greatest writers here write and speak upon the greatest subjects of our time:
*Lorrie Moore and Raymond Carver on "Heartbreak"
*Vladimir Nabokov on SEX
*Kurt Vonnegut and Susan Sontag on "War"
*Jonathan Franzen on "Betrayal"
*Jeffrey Eugenides and Norman Mailer on "Death"
*Philip Roth on "God"
Inspiring a dizzying range of thought and emotion, the collection holds a mirror to the world we live in and to the reader's own hopes, dreams, fears, and joy.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

The Paris Review has published fiction, poetry, interviews, essays, and art since 1953. They have published the work of Philip Roth and Seamus Heaney, William Styron and Truman Capote, Toni Morrison and Alice Munro, among others, and have interviewed everyone from Vladimir Nabokov to Ralph Ellison to Richard Ford.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Paris Review Book
HEARTBREAKLorrie MooreTerrific MotherAlthough she had been around them her whole life, it was when she reached thirty-five that holding babies seemed to make her nervous--just at the beginning, a twinge of stage fright swinging up from the gut. "Adrienne, would you like to hold the baby? Would you mind?" Always these words from a woman her age looking kind and beseeching--a former friend, she was losing her friends to babble and beseech--and Adrienne would force herself to breathe deep. Holding a baby was no longer natural--she was no longer natural--but a test of womanliness and earthly skills. She was being observed. People looked to see how she would do it. She had entered a puritanical decade, a demographic moment--whatever it was--when the best compliment you could get was: You would make a terrific mother. The wolf whistle of the nineties.So when she was at the Spearsons' Labor Day picnic, and when Sally Spearson had handed her the baby, Adrienne had burbled at it as she would a pet, had jostled the child gently, made clicking noises with her tongue, affectionately cooing, "Hello punkinhead, hello my little punkinhead," had reached to shoo a fly away and, amidst the smells of old grass and the fatty crackle of the barbecue, lost her balance when the picnic bench, dowels rotting in the joints, wobbled and began to topple her--the bench! The wobbly picnic bench was toppling her! And when she fell backward, spraining her spine--in the slowed quickness of this flipping world she saw the clayey clouds, some frozen faces, one lone star like the nose of a jet--and when thebaby's head hit the stone retaining wall of the Spearsons' newly terraced yard and bled fatally into the brain, Adrienne went home shortly thereafter, after the hospital and the police reports, and did not leave her attic apartment for seven months, and there were fears, deep fears for her, on the part of Martin Porter, the man she had been dating, and on the part of almost everyone, including Sally Spearson who phoned tearfully to say that she forgave her, that Adrienne might never come out. 
Those months were dark and cavernous with mourning. Martin Porter usually visited her bringing a pepper cheese or a Casbah couscous cup; he had become her only friend. He was divorced and worked as a research economist, though he looked more like a Scottish lumberjack--graying hair, red-flecked beard, a favorite flannel shirt in green and gold. He was getting ready to take a trip abroad. "We could get married," he suggested. That way, he said, Adrienne could accompany him to northern Italy, to a villa in the Alps set up for scholars and academic conferences. She could be a spouse. They gave spouses studios to work in. Some studios had pianos. Some had desks or potter's wheels. "You can do whatever you want." He was finishing the second draft of a study of first-world imperialism's impact on third-world monetary systems. "You could paint. Or not. You could not paint."She looked at him closely, hungrily, then turned away. She still felt clumsy and big, a beefy killer in a cage, in need of the thinning prison food. "You love me, don't you," she said. She had spent the better part of seven months napping in a leotard, an electric fan blowing at her, her left ear catching the wind, capturing it there in her head, like the sad sea in a shell. She felt clammy and doomed. "Or do you just feel sorry for me?" She swatted at a small swarm of gnats that had appeared suddenly out of an abandoned can of Coke."I don't feel sorry for you.""You don't?""I feel for you. I've grown to love you. We're grownups here. One grows to do things." He was a practical man. He often referred to the annual departmental cocktail party as "standing around getting paid.""I don't think, Martin, that we can get married.""Of course we can get married." He unbuttoned his cuffs as if to roll up his sleeves."You don't understand. Normal life is no longer possible for me. I've stepped off all the normal paths and am living in the bushes. I'm a bushwoman now. I don't feel that I can have the normal things. Marriage is a normal thing. You need the normal courtship, the normal proposal." She couldn't think what else. Water burned her eyes. She waved a hand dismissively, and it passed through her field of vision like something murderous and huge."Normal courtship, normal proposal," Martin said. He took off his shirt and pants and shoes. He lay on the bed in just his socks and underwear and pressed the length of his body against her. "I'm going to marry you, whether you like it or not." He took her face into his hands and looked longingly at her mouth. "I'm going to marry you till you puke." 
They were met at Malpensa by a driver who spoke little English but who held up a sign that said VILLA HIRSCHBORN, and when Adrienne and Martin approached him, he nodded and said, "Hello, buon giorno. Signor Porter?" The drive to the villa took two hours, uphill and down, through the countryside and several small villages, but it wasn't until the driver pulled up to the precipitous hill he called La Madre Vertiginoso, and the villa's iron gates somehow opened automatically then closed behind them, it wasn't until then, winding up the drive past the spectacular gardens and the sunny vineyard and the terraces of the stucco outbuildings, that it occurred to Adrienne that Martin's being invited here was a great honor. He had won this thing, and he got to live here for a month."Does this feel like a honeymoon?" she asked him."A what? Oh, a honeymoon. Yes." He turned and patted her thigh indifferently.He was jet-lagged. That was it. She smoothed her skirt, which was wrinkled and damp. "Yes, I can see us growing old together," she said, squeezing his hand. "In the next few weeks, in fact." If she ever got married again, she would do it properly. The awkward ceremony, the embarrassing relatives, the cumbersome, ecologically unsound gifts. She and Martin had simply gone to City Hall, and then askedtheir family and friends not to send presents but to donate money to Greenpeace. Now, however, as they slowed before the squashed-nosed stone lions at the entrance of the villa, its perfect border of forget-me-nots and yews, its sparkling glass door, Adrienne gasped. Whales, she thought quickly. Whales got my crystal.The upstairs "Principessa" room, which they were ushered into by a graceful, bilingual butler named Carlo, was elegant and huge--a piano, a large bed, dressers stenciled with festoons of fruit. There was maid service twice a day, said Carlo. There were sugar wafers, towels, mineral water and mints. There was dinner at eight, breakfast until nine. When Carlo bowed and departed, Martin kicked off his shoes and sank into the ancient, tapestried chaise. "I've heard these 'fake' quattrocento paintings on the wall are fake for tax purposes only," he whispered. "If you know what I mean.""Really," said Adrienne. She felt like one of the workers taking over the Winter Palace. Her own voice sounded booming. "You know, Mussolini was captured around here. Think about it."Martin looked puzzled. "What do you mean?""That he was around here. That they captured him. I don't know. I was reading the little book on it. Leave me alone." She flopped down on the bed. Martin was changing already. He'd been better when they were just dating, with the pepper cheese. She let her face fall deep into the pillow, her mouth hanging open like a dog's, and then she slept until six, dreaming that a baby was in her arms but that it turned into a stack of plates, which she had to juggle, tossing them into the air. 
A loud sound awoke her. A falling suitcase. Everyone had to dress for dinner, and Martin was yanking things out, groaning his way into a jacket and tie. Adrienne got up, bathed and put on pantyhose which, because it had been months since she had done so, twisted around her leg like the stripe on a barber pole."You're walking as if you'd torn a ligament," said Martin, locking the door to their room, as they were leaving.Adrienne pulled at the knees of the hose, but couldn't make them work. "Tell me you like my skirt, Martin, or I'm going to have to go back in and never come out again.""I like your skirt. It's great. You're great. I'm great," he said, like a conjugation. He took her arm and they limped their way down the curved staircase (Was it sweeping? Yes! It was sweeping!) to the dining room, where Carlo ushered them in to find their places at the table. The seating arrangement at the tables would change nightly, Carlo said in a clipped Italian accent, "to assist the cross-pollination of ideas.""Excuse me?" said Adrienne.There were about thirty-five people, all of them middle aged, with the academic's strange, mixed expression of merriment and weariness. "A cross between flirtation and a fender bender," Martin had described it once. Adrienne's place was at the opposite side of the room from him, between a historian writing a book on a monk named Jaocim de Flore and a musicologist who had devoted his life to a quest for "the earnest andante." Everyone sat in elaborate wooden chairs, the backs of which were carved with gargoylish heads that poked up from behind either shoulder of the sitter, like a warning."De Flore," said Adrienne, at a loss, turning from her carpaccio to the monk man. "Doesn't that mean 'of the flower'?" She had recently learned that disaster meant "bad star" and she was looking for an opportunity to brandish and bronze this tidbit in conversation.The monk man looked at her. "Are you one of the spouses?""Yes," she said. She looked down then back up. "But then so is my husband.""You're not a screenwriter, are you?""No," she said. "I'm a painter. Actually more of a printmaker. Actually, more of a--right now I'm in transition."He nodded and dug back into his food. "I'm always afraid they're going to start letting screenwriters in here."There was an arugula salad, and osso bucco for the main course. She turned now to the musicologist. "So you usually find them insincere? The andantes?" She looked quickly out over the other heads to give Martin a fake and girlish wave."It's the use of the minor seventh," sniffed the musicologist. "So fraudulent and replete." 
"If the food wasn't so good, I'd leave now," she said to Martin. They were lying in bed, in their carpeted skating rink of a room. It could beweeks, she knew, before they'd have sex here. "So fraudulent and replete," she said in a high nasal voice the likes of which Martin had heard only once before, in a departmental meeting chaired by an embittered, interim chair who did imitations of colleagues not in the room. "Can you even use the word replete like that?""As soon as you get settled in your studio, you'll feel better," said Martin, beginning to fade. He groped under the covers to find her hand and clasp it."I want a divorce," whispered Adrienne."I'm not giving you one," he said, bringing her hand up to his chest and placing it there, like a medallion, like a necklace of sleep, and then he began softly to snore, the quietest of radiators.They were given bagged lunches and told to work well. Martin's studio was a modern glass cube in the middle of one of the gardens. Adrienne's was a musty stone hut twenty minutes farther up the hill and out onto the wooded headland, along a dirt path where small darting lizards sunned. She unlocked the door with the key she had been given, went in, and immediately sat down and ate the entire bagged lunch--quickly, compulsively, though it was only nine-thirty in the morning. Two apples, some cheese, and a jam sandwich. "A jelly bread," she said aloud, holding up the sandwich, scrutinizing it under the light.She set her sketch pad on the work table and began a morning full of killing spiders and drawing their squashed and tragic bodies. The spiders were star shaped, hairy, and scuttling like crabs. They were fallen stars. Bad stars. They were earth's animal-try at heaven. Often she had to step on them twice--they were large and ran fast. Stepping on them once usually just made them run faster.It was the careless universe's work she was performing, death itchy, and about like a cop. Her personal fund of mercy for the living was going to get used up in dinner conversation at the villa. She had no compassion to spare, only a pencil and a shoe."Art trouvé?" said Martin, toweling himself dry from his shower, as they dressed for the evening cocktail hour."Spider trouvé," she said. "A delicate, aboriginal dish." Martin let out a howling laugh that alarmed her. She looked at him, then looked down at her shoes. He needed her. Tomorrow she would have to godown into town and find a pair of sexy Italian sandals that showed the cleavage of her toes. She would have to take him dancing. They would have to hold each other and lead each other back to love or they'd go nuts here. They'd grow mocking and arch and violent. One of them would stick a foot out, and the other would trip. That sort of thing.At dinner she sat next to a medievalist who had just finished his sixth book on The Canterbury Tales."Sixth," repeated Adrienne."There's a lot there," he said defensively."I'm sure," she said."I read deep," he added. "I read hard.""How nice for you."He looked at her narrowly. "Of course, you probably think I should write a book about Cat Stevens." She nodded neutrally. "I see," he said.For dessert Carlo was bringing in a white chocolate torte, and she decided to spend most of the coffee and dessert time talking about it. Desserts like these are born, not made, she would say. She was already practicing, rehearsing for courses. "I mean," she said to the Swedish physicist on her left, "until today, my feeling about white chocolate, was: Why? What was the point? You might as well have been eating goddamn wax." She had her elbow on the table, her hand up near her face, and she looked anxiously past the physicist to smile at Martin at the other end of the long table. She waved her fingers in the air like bug legs."Yes, of course," said the physicist, frowning. "You must be--well, are you one of the spouses?" 
She began in the mornings to gather with some of the other spouses--they were going to have little tank tops printed up--in the music room for exercise. This way she could avoid hearing words like Heideggerian and ideological at breakfast; it always felt too early in the morning for those words. The women pushed back the damask sofas, and cleared a space on the rug where all of them could do little hip and thigh exercises, led by the wife of the Swedish physicist. Up, down, up down."I guess this relaxes you," said the white-haired woman next to her."Bourbon relaxes you," said Adrienne. "This carves you.""Bourbon carves you," said a redhead from Brazil."You have to go visit this person down in the village," whispered the white-haired woman. She wore a Spalding sporting goods T-shirt."What person?""Yes, what person?" asked the blonde.The white-haired woman stopped and handed both of them a card from the pocket of her shorts. "She'...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

The Paris Review
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Big River Books
(Powder Springs, GA, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Paperback. Book Condition: New. Brand New! We ship daily Monday - Friday!. Bookseller Inventory # 1EY82M00AWRQ

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 15.38
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.49
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

2.

The Paris Review
Published by Picador (2004)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
pickabook
(San francisco, CA, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Picador, 2004. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Bookseller Inventory # mon0000147557

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 19.75
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

3.

The Paris Review
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Paperbackshop-US
(Wood Dale, IL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description 2000. PAP. Book Condition: New. New Book. Shipped from US within 10 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000. Bookseller Inventory # KS-9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 21.41
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

4.

The Paris Review
Published by Picador USA 9/5/2000 (2000)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback or Softback Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
BargainBookStores
(Grand Rapids, MI, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Picador USA 9/5/2000, 2000. Paperback or Softback. Book Condition: New. The Paris Review Book: Of Heartbreak, Madness, Sex, Love, Betrayal, Outsiders, Intoxication, War, Whimsy, Horrors, God, Death, Dinner, Baseba. Book. Bookseller Inventory # BBS-9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 27.07
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

5.

The Paris Review
Published by Picador (2017)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: > 20
Print on Demand
Seller:
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Picador, 2017. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Never used! This item is printed on demand. Bookseller Inventory # 0312422393

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 25.45
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 1.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

6.

The Paris Review
Published by Picador (2004)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Picador, 2004. Paperback. Book Condition: New. book. Bookseller Inventory # M0312422393

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 27.48
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

7.

The Paris Review
Published by St Martin s Press, United States (2004)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St Martin s Press, United States, 2004. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . Brand New Book. For a half-century, The Paris Review has published writing and interviews from the world s most brilliant authors. To commemorate the anniversary, a breathtakingly diverse and illuminating anthology has been assembled. The greatest writers here write and speak upon the greatest subjects of our time: *Lorrie Moore and Raymond Carver on Heartbreak *Vladimir Nabokov on SEX *Kurt Vonnegut and Susan Sontag on War *Jonathan Franzen on Betrayal *Jeffrey Eugenides and Norman Mailer on Death *Philip Roth on God Inspiring a dizzying range of thought and emotion, the collection holds a mirror to the world we live in and to the reader s own hopes, dreams, fears, and joy. Bookseller Inventory # AAS9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 28.02
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

8.

The Paris Review
Published by St Martin s Press, United States (2004)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
The Book Depository US
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St Martin s Press, United States, 2004. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . Brand New Book. For a half-century, The Paris Review has published writing and interviews from the world s most brilliant authors. To commemorate the anniversary, a breathtakingly diverse and illuminating anthology has been assembled. The greatest writers here write and speak upon the greatest subjects of our time: *Lorrie Moore and Raymond Carver on Heartbreak *Vladimir Nabokov on SEX *Kurt Vonnegut and Susan Sontag on War *Jonathan Franzen on Betrayal *Jeffrey Eugenides and Norman Mailer on Death *Philip Roth on God Inspiring a dizzying range of thought and emotion, the collection holds a mirror to the world we live in and to the reader s own hopes, dreams, fears, and joy. Bookseller Inventory # AAS9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 28.89
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

9.

The Paris Review
Published by St Martin s Press, United States (2004)
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
Book Depository hard to find
(London, United Kingdom)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St Martin s Press, United States, 2004. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Reprint. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. For a half-century, The Paris Review has published writing and interviews from the world s most brilliant authors. To commemorate the anniversary, a breathtakingly diverse and illuminating anthology has been assembled. The greatest writers here write and speak upon the greatest subjects of our time: *Lorrie Moore and Raymond Carver on Heartbreak *Vladimir Nabokov on SEX *Kurt Vonnegut and Susan Sontag on War *Jonathan Franzen on Betrayal *Jeffrey Eugenides and Norman Mailer on Death *Philip Roth on God Inspiring a dizzying range of thought and emotion, the collection holds a mirror to the world we live in and to the reader s own hopes, dreams, fears, and joy. Bookseller Inventory # BZE9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 29.79
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
From United Kingdom to U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

10.

Review, The Paris
Published by Picador
ISBN 10: 0312422393 ISBN 13: 9780312422394
New PAPERBACK Quantity Available: 10
Seller:
Lakeside Books
(Benton Harbor, MI, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description Picador. PAPERBACK. Book Condition: New. 0312422393 BRAND NEW, GIFT QUALITY! NOT OVERSTOCKS OR MARKED UP REMAINDERS! DIRECT FROM THE PUBLISHER!|2.35. Bookseller Inventory # OTF-S-9780312422394

More Information About This Seller | Ask Bookseller a Question

Buy New
US$ 26.30
Convert Currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, Rates & Speeds

There are more copies of this book

View all search results for this book