Homemade Fun: 101 Crafts and Activities to Do with Kids

3.4 avg rating
( 15 ratings by Goodreads )
 
9780312610777: Homemade Fun: 101 Crafts and Activities to Do with Kids
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

Homemade Fun is Rae Grant's third charming family activity book. Like the previous books in the series, Homemade Fun offers a generous collection of classic activities for kids and families who enjoy making creative projects at home, paired with delightful vintage art throughout. Parents, especially moms who are juggling kids, time, and a budget, can use this book as a resource when looking for ways to enrich and entertain their kids. Featuring a versatile compilation of classic crafts, games, and activities that are family and kid-oriented, the book can be used for many different situations including camp activities, after-school activities, birthday parties, rainy day events, and vacations as well.

Homemade Fun will provide hours of family fun!
--stitch a handy wallet
--build a tool box
--decorate a pillowcase
--make paper flowers
--bake pretzels
--decorate cupcakes
--have a pizza party
--hold a bubble race
plus so much more!

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

RAE GRANT  is a book designer, collage illustrator, and author. Her background in fine letterpress, printing, and bookmaking established her reputation for designing high-quality illustrated books. Rae lives in Manhattan with her daughter and husband. Her previous books are Crafting Fun and Cooking Fun.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Homemade Fun
Hand Sewing and EmbroideryHand Sewing and EmbroideryRecycled Containers Sewing Equipment Sewing Terms Repurposing Good Stuff to Repurpose Rules for Hand Sewing Threading a Needle Masking a Knot Running Stitch Backstitch Creasing and Hemming Buttons Useful Embroidery Stitches Up-and-Down Stitch Straight Stitch Flower Stem Stitch Satin Stitch Blanket Stitch Crisscross Stitch Chain Stitch French Knot Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion Bluebird Ornament Lunch Money Wallet Embroidered Pillowcase Placemat Roll-Up Pouch Washcloth Puppet Tooth Fairy Pillow Soft Toy BunnyRecycled ContainersEveryday containers can be reused for storing your sewing supplies. Before you buy anything from the store, check in the cupboards and closets for useful throwaways. Look around your house for some of the containers listed below. Be sure to rinse and clean tins before using.Berry boxes (wooden or cardboard) Baking powder tins Biscuit and cookie tins Candy and gum tins Cardboard cheese containers with lids Cardboard oatmeal containers with lids Drawstring bags Lidded candy boxes Plastic or metal toolbox Shoeboxes with lids (adult or kid-size) Small orange crates Soap boxes Straw baskets with lids Tea tins and small tea boxesSewing EquipmentFor the projects in this book, you will need the following supplies:Buttons, eyelets, and snaps Clear plastic ruler Cloth tape measure Craft scissors for cutting paper Embroidery floss Embroidery hoops (two 6-inch, either wooden or plastic) Hand-sewing needles (size 6 or 7 sharps and large wide-eye needles) Non-sharp metal or plastic blunted needle Pencils with erasers for marking sewing linesPinking shears (optional) Sewing basket or other recycled containers Sharp scissors for cutting fabric Small magnet for picking up stray pins Straight pins (large, colored-head pins are easier to handle) Safety pins Thimble (metal or plastic) Thread (good quality brand name in off-white or gray) Water-soluble marking pensSewing TermsFabric: Cloth or material woven from cotton, wool, linen, or silk. Soft cotton cloth (like muslin) is best for a beginner.Selvage: The finished edge that runs lengthwise on a piece of fabric. It will not fray or unravel.Raw edge: The edge of the fabric that is cut or torn.Warp and weft: These are the threads of the cloth. The threads running lengthwise are the warp threads, and those running across from selvage to selvage are the weft. The warp is usually stronger than the weft.Folded Edge: The edge made by doubling one part of the cloth over the other.Wrong side: The side of the fabric that faces in when you wear a garment.Right side: The side of the fabric that faces out when you wear a garment.TIPWash and dry fabric before using to prevent shrinking.To tear a piece of cloth, make a 1-inch cut into the cloth. Holding the corner of each cut between the thumb and forefinger of each hand, pull the edges away from you and tear carefully.RepurposingTo repurpose an item is to take something old, like a shirt, and reuse it to make a new item. It's an old tradition and a good habit to practice when starting any craft project. Not only is it environmentally friendly to recycle as much as we can, it's also fun and challenging to create something new from a favorite old shirt or pair of pants. The very best place for you to look for material to repurpose is right in your own home, maybe even in your closet or dresser. It's a little like a treasure hunt--there's no telling what old and useful things you might find. Be sure to check with your parents before cutting anything.Good Stuff to RepurposeAprons Burlap Baby blankets, cotton or fleece Cotton clothing Dish towels Denim jeans Felt scraps Flannel pajamas Fleece clothing Flour sacks Handkerchiefs or bandanas Men's shirts with cuffs Napkins or dish towels Pillowcases or sheets Placemats Ribbon and string Socks Tablecloths Washcloths or bath towelsRules for Hand Sewing1 . Work with clean hands to avoid getting dirt or smudges on the fabric. Do not put any sewing material or equipment in your mouth!2. Always sew with a thimble on the index or middle finger of the opposite hand holding the needle. Use it to push the eye-end of the needle through the fabric or to protect your finger when pushing the needle through fabric.3. Avoid eye strain by working ill a room with plenty of natural daylight or good lighting. It is best to sit in a sturdy chair with your sewing basket nearby.4. When passing scissors or anything sharp to someone, be sure the tips are closed and the pointy side is facing down. This will prevent any accidental poking and pricks.5. Protect your scissors by keeping them closed and stored in a small fabric case or a Placemat Roll-Up Pouch when not in use.TIPMake a Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion for storing pins and needles,Threading a NeedleA needle is a small piece of steel with a point on one end and a small opening on the other end. This opening is called the eye of the needle. Store your needles in Jelly Jar Lid Pin Cushion or a needle case. 
1. Measure and cut a length of thread about 12 inches. This length will help you manage the thread as you sew and prevent tangling and knots. Before threading your needle, snip off one end of your thread to make it even and smooth. This will allow you poke it through the eye of the needle more easily.2. Next, hold the needle between the thumb and forefinger of your left hand. with the eye of the needle sitting a little above your pinched fingers. Moisten the tip of the thread to a point and then poke it through the eye of the needle. Pull the thread through about 3 inches and make a knot in the other end.TIPIf you are having trouble threading your needle try holding the needle and thread above a white sheet of paper near a light.Making a KnotTo make a knot at the end of your thread, wrap the end around your index finger once or twice. Loosen the wrap a little hit and slip the loop off your finger. Slip the top end of the thread through the small loop and pull.Running StitchThis sturdy stitch is used to make a seam to hold two pieces of fabric together. The running stitch is made by running or weaving the needle in and out of the fabric using small, even stitches. (The stitches do not overlap.) 
1. To practice a Running Stitch, draw a line on a piece of fabric. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Take a small stitch down and run your needle underneath the fabric along the lime you have drawn.3. Push the needle up from the other side just in front of the last stitch. Continue this method of going up and down in small stitches along your line.4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back or the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end hack through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.TIPWhen using this stitch for an embroidery project, experiment with different thicknesses of thread to decide which you like best for your project. A thin thread will make a light line and a thicker thread make a wider or bolder one.BackstitchUse a to make an extra strong seam. This stitch can also be used to make bold or delicate lines when embroidering. 
1. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the Needle up through the back of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric. Make one small stitch to the right of where your Needle came up.2. Next, weave the needle forward so it is in front of your starting point, about the length of a small stitch, and pull the needle all the way through (Figure 1).3. Repeat as above. Go back towards your last stitch. Poke the needle down through the fabric, just in front of the last stitch. Pull the needle all the way through and begin the next stitch. Continue stitching the length of the line (Figure 2).4. When you come to the end. take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Creasing and HemmingTo hem is to turn fabric under in two small folds and sew the folded edge to the under layer. It is used for many of the sewing projects in this book. 
1. A crease is made by folding the fabric and pressing along the edge with your thumbnail until a line is made. To prepare the hem, you will need to crease the fabric First, fold the edge of the fabric down 1/2 inch and crease it well, then fold the fabric down another 1/2 inch and crease again.2. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Starling at one end of your project, poke the needle underneath the fold and pull it up through the folded edge until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1). Tuck the knot under the edge using the point or the needle.3. Point the needle into the fabric on a slant to take up two threads from the under layer and then through the fabric on the folded edge. Keep the needle on a slanted line pointing towards the left shoulder (Figure 2).4. Continue making close and slanting stitches through all layers until you reach the end of the folded edge (Figure 3). When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.ButtonsAt some point you will lose a button from your clothing and will want to repair it. Sew-through buttons are the most common type of button. They are flat with two or four holes, But buttons aren't only for practical things, they can also be used as decoration on fabric patches and small pillows. 
1. Mark the oil the fabric where you want your button to go will a straight pin. (If you are mending you can usually find the old hole.)2. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Starting at A Figure 1 , pull the needle up through the hack of the spot you have marked and place your button on the needle. Slide it to the end of the thread, against the fabric.3. Next, poke the needle down through the second hole B (Figure 1) and into the fabric. Repeat the A B step twice, and bring the needle back up through C and then down through D (Figure 2). Repeat the C-D steps twice. Finish with your needle under the button and tie the thread in a knot. Your stitches will have formed the letter "X" on the surface of the button.TIPTo sew on two-hole buttons first pull the needle up through the first button hole then weave the end back down through the second hole (see Button Bracelet). Repeat threading through the hole twice and then finish as above.See a pin and pick it up, All the day you'll have good luck; See a pin and let it lay, Bad luck you'll have all the day. A Nursery RhymeUseful Embroidery StitchesUp-and-Down StitchThe Up-and-Down Stitch (also know as a running straight stitch) is easy to learn and can be used to make simple creative designs. Use it to embroider a small decorative flower on fabric or sew two pieces of fabric together. 
1. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. Poke the needle up through the hack of the fabric until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1).2. Next, poke the needle down along the design or seam line (Figure 2). Pull the needle down through the fabric and then poke it up just in front of the last stitch. Continue going up and down along the line until you have reached the end of the fabric.3. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Straight Stitch flowerTrace or draw a flower on your sample fabric to practice making flowers with the straight stitch. 
1 . Use a pencil lo draw a flower on fabric (Figure 1).2. Thread your needle and tie a knot at the end. At the outside end of one drawn line, poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the needle through until the knot tugs against the fabric (Figure 1).3. Next. position the needle at the inside end of the drawn line and poke down into the fabric. Weave your needle from underneath the end point, and come up at the beginning of the next inside line (Figure 2). Pull the thread lightly so that it lies flat on the line. (If it is a little twisted flatten it out with your fingers.) Take your needle to the back end point of the line and continue stitching until you finish.4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch. but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before dipping any extra thread.Stem StitchThe stem stitch is good for outlining curves, and stems, The stitches are always sewn at a slant.1. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.2. Make a Straight Stitch from point A to B. Point the needle back towards point A and insert through the fabric at point B, then come through at point C (Figure 1). Pull the thread through gently.3. Next, take the needle back ¼ inch from your last stitch. Insert the needle through the fabric at point D and come back up through the fabric just right of the B hole (Figure 2). Repeat the same steps as described and continue stitching to the next point, keeping the tension even and the stitches the same length (Figure 3).4. When you come to the end, take the thread to the back of the fabric for the last stitch, but don't come up again. Secure the thread by weaving the end back through the stitching before clipping any extra thread.Satin StitchThe Satin Stitch is used to fill in designs for leaves, stems, and flower petals. Use four to six strands of embroidery floss when working with this stitch. Be sure the fabric is tight in your embroidery hoop. This will help you make firm stitches.1. Draw a leaf shape design (Leaf Art Journal) onto your fabric.2. Thread your needle and tie the end in a knot. Poke the needle up through the back of the fabric and pull the thread through until the knot tugs against the fabric.3. Starting on the left side, come up at A and go down at B, making a Straight Stitch the width of your leaf shape. Next, come up at C. Continue to sew the straight stitches close t...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

Top Search Results from the AbeBooks Marketplace

1.

Grant, Rae
Published by St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN 10: 0312610777 ISBN 13: 9780312610777
New Quantity Available: 4
Seller:
zeebooks
(Foley, AL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St. Martin's Griffin. Hardcover-SPIRAL. Condition: New. 0312610777 Brand new. Any book may show light shelf wear from warehouse storage and handling. Seller Inventory # 42170

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 30.94
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 4.45
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

2.

Grant, Rae
Published by St. Martin's Griffin (2010)
ISBN 10: 0312610777 ISBN 13: 9780312610777
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 2
Seller:
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St. Martin's Griffin, 2010. Hardcover-spiral. Condition: New. Never used!. Seller Inventory # P110312610777

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 47.88
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

3.

Rae Grant
Published by St. Martin's Griffin (2010)
ISBN 10: 0312610777 ISBN 13: 9780312610777
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St. Martin's Griffin, 2010. Hardcover-spiral. Condition: New. Spi. Seller Inventory # DADAX0312610777

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 43.99
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: US$ 3.99
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds

4.

Rae Grant
Published by St. Martin's Griffin (2010)
ISBN 10: 0312610777 ISBN 13: 9780312610777
New Hardcover Quantity Available: 1
Seller:
Irish Booksellers
(Portland, ME, U.S.A.)
Rating
[?]

Book Description St. Martin's Griffin, 2010. Condition: New. book. Seller Inventory # M0312610777

More information about this seller | Contact this seller

Buy New
US$ 50.62
Convert currency

Add to Basket

Shipping: FREE
Within U.S.A.
Destination, rates & speeds