What the Twilight Says

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9780374288419: What the Twilight Says

A collection of essays gathers pieces written over more than twenty years, including examinations of Caribbean culture and commentary on some of the world's great writers

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Review:

Derek Walcott's identity as a poet is evident even in his literary criticism. Who else would produce a sentence such as "Let the shaggy, long horde of spiky letters and the dark rumbling of hexametrical phalanxes rise over the outback towards the capital of the English language" to describe the work of a fellow poet--in this case, Australian Les Murray? Indeed, each of the essays in What the Twilight Says is at least as rich in language as it is in ideas; so much so, in fact, that at times the view is obscured by the verbiage. Nevertheless, beneath the loco rococo turns of phrase Walcott has some serious points to make. In his discussion of V.S. Naipaul, for example, he offers some telling insights into the effects of colonialism on his subject's psyche: "What is the cost to his Indianness of loving England?" Walcott asks; "To whom does he owe any fealty? Ancestors? The surroundings that history placed them in, the cane fields of Trinidad, were contemptible, as they themselves would have to be, having lost both shame and pride. Therefore, the only dignity is to be neither master nor servant, to choose a nobler servitude: writing. The punishment for the choice is the astonishment of gratitude; to be grateful to the vegetation of an English shire. Not to India or the West Indies, but to the sweet itch of an old wound." Walcott praises Naipaul's genius while calling him on his racism, selfishness, and disdain for his roots--in effect loving the sinner while hating the sin. His essay on Joseph Brodsky is an intelligent meditation on the art of translation while "The Muse of History" looks at the influence of history in New World literature. From a discussion of the poetry of Ted Hughes to an open love letter to Martiniquan writer Patrick Chamoiseau, Derek Walcott provides plenty of provocative food for thought wrapped in poetical prose. --Alix Wilber

About the Author:

Derek Walcott was born in St. Lucia in 1930. His recent works include Omeros and The Bounty. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. He lives in New York City and Castries, St. Lucia.

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Walcott, Derek
Published by Farrar Straus Giroux (1998)
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Derek Walcott
Published by Farar, Straus and Giroux (New York) (1998)
ISBN 10: 0374288410 ISBN 13: 9780374288419
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Book Description Farar, Straus and Giroux (New York), 1998. Hardcover. Book Condition: New. Dust Jacket Condition: New. 1st Edition. First edition, first printing. Hardbound. BRAND NEW! Fine in a fine dust jacket. A tight, clean copy, unread. Jacket unclipped with publisher's price intact. Comes with archival-quality mylar dust jacket protector. Shipped in well padded box. SIGNED BY AUTHOR on title page. He has signed his name only. Signed by Author(s). Bookseller Inventory # 893

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