No Locations Russ Whitney BUILDING WEALTH

ISBN 13: 9780671866174

BUILDING WEALTH

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9780671866174: BUILDING WEALTH

The creator of Whitney Leadership Group seminars reveals how to make money in various aspects of real estate, presenting tested techniques for building capital, prospering in bad economic times, and more. 75,000 first printing. $60,000 ad/promo. Tour.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

About the Author:

Russ Whitney is recognized worldwide as a leader in the investment-training field and is chairman and CEO of Whitney Information Network, Inc. (WIN). He is also the bestselling author of Millionaire Real Estate Mentor and The Millionaire Real Estate Mindset.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Chapter 1

Light Your Internal Fire

Destiny is not a mater of chance; it's a mater of choice.
Unknown

When I was 20, I got the best job I thought I'd ever have: I was making $5 an hour killing hogs.

I worked in a slaughterhouse where, on a good day, 1,400 hogs were butchered. The process was very systematic. The 400-pound hogs were herded up a chum. At the top of the chute, they were stunned by an electric shock to the back of the neck, causing them to fall onto a conveyor belt. At that point, we could shackle their hind legs (that was my job) and they were flipped upside down so the man next to me could cut their jugular vein. Then they would bled to death.

It was messy, disgusting work, and I believed I would be doing it for the rest of my life.

Then I noticed a magazine ad for a "get rich" program. I was wary and didn't respond to that ad; in fact, I studied a number of ads before I answered any of them. But just reading the first one set my thoughts in motion, and it wasn't long before I realized I didn't want "a job" -- and certainly not a job in a slaughterhouse.

I waned to be wealthy.

It was quite an ambition for a high school dropout with a bad attitude. And even though I knew what I wanted, I didn't know how to go about getting it. So I started answering some of those ads. I got replies about how to make mail-order millions, how to make $300,000 a year stuffing envelopes, the lazy way to riches, various franchises, and dozens of other responses that were probably a mix of legitimate opportunities and outright scams.

If you've ever responded to any of these ads, you've got a good idea of the kind of stuff that filled my mailbox. If you haven't, I'm going to save you a lot of disappointment, time, and money. I'm going to tell you how to find the real road to more money and security.

But first, it's important that you know how I did it. As I said, when I decided I waned to become wealthy, I was a 20-year-old high school dropout working at a dead-end job. I easily could have used my lousy childhood as an excuse for never achieving anything significant. Also, I had to consider the fact that I was married and my wife was expecting our first child. I had obligations and bills, and I needed a shady income. I didn't have much, but I couldn't afford to risk what I had.

So there I was, accumulating a drawerful of money-making ideas that wouldn't work for me, primarily because they required large up-front investments. Then I saw an ad for a book on building wealth that did not brag about overnight success. I discussed it at length with my wife, because the book (long since out of print) was $10 -- a significant amount of money for us at the time. We debated, and since the publisher offered a money-back satisfaction guarantee, we finally agreed to give it a try. I mailed in my order, and when the book came, I started to read it.

I literally stayed up all night reading, taking notes, and making plans. I was young and naive, but I wasn't stupid. I immediately realized there was no magic to building wealth. It was definitely something I could do.

Three weeks later, I made $11,000.

Now that's not a tremendous amount of money, but it was more than I made in a year at the slaughterhouse -- and I did it on a very part-time basis. I thought, d I could make that much money that quickly after reading one tittle book, imagine what I could do if I read a few more! I began building a library of these types of books, focusing on the fundamental principles, and selectively following the advice that sounded realistic and sensible.

By the time I turned 23, I was able to quit my job, because I had become financially independent. By the time I was 27, I had been written up in several publications as one of the youngest self-made millionaires in the United States!

The methods I used were not complicated. I've refined them slightly over the years, and they we still working for me today. They can be used by virtually anyone, anywhere, on a full- or part-time basis, and they don't necessarily require a let of capital or credit. They do, however, require Sat you redirect your thinking and develop a game plan.

I've taken the fundamental principles -- the ones that work -- and figured out how anyone, regardless of their experience or education level, can use them to become wealthy, too. Basically I have cut out the pie-in-the-sky stuff, the empty premiss, and put together a program that I know works -- and I know it works because I've done it, and I've already taught countless others how to do it.

I can't tell you how wealthy you will eventually become, but I can tell you this: If you will follow the steps outlined in this book, you will see a very rapid improvement in your financial circumstances, and you will be on your way to building your own personal fortune.

Think like a High School Dropout

At the age of 20, it seemed as if my life had been just one hardship after another. My mother left my father and me when I was 3, and then he died when I was 14. Not only was I emotionally devastated, but I had to get a job to support myself and wound up quitting school in the eleventh grade. I was very naive, and I was desperate for something or someone to believe in. Everywhere I turned, I hit a wall.

But I kept on looking. I found my wife, and knew almost from Se minute we were introduced that this was the woman I would spend the rest of my life with. We both came from working-class backgrounds where the accepted life pattern was to work at a job, save up enough to make a down payment on a house, work until you were 65, retire wis a gold watch and a meager pennon, and die a few yews later. After we were married, we realized we waned more for ourselves and our children. I began my search for financial security, and Ingrid prodded the much-needed moral support. It wasn't easy, but we knew that America was full of rags-to-riches stories, and if it could happen for someone else, it could happen for us.

All we had to do was figure out a way.

In my own case, I went out and aphid one idea -- and made $11,000 in throe weeks. I had faith in a system. Had I been a little mom sophisticated, a little mom educated, I might have questioned it, and I might not have tried it. But I was thinking like the high school dropout I was, and it worked.

As I travel around the country giving lectures, I frequently ask audiences for a show of hands of those who have gone to college. The usual response is about 90 percent. This means the vast majority of the people I speak to about wealth building have a college education -- and they're coming to hear a high school dropout tell them how to make more money. And the real irony is that their education may well be the mason why they don't have mom money than they do.

Let's be very clear on this: A college education does have value, but formal schooling will not teach you how to make money. You probably know some very wall educated people who are living a life of financial failure, or at least economic mediocrity. You may be one of them. If you are, take heart: You can overcome your education.

The Paralysis of Analysis

I once had a business partner who held an MBA dong with degrees in engineering and accounting. Every time I came up with a new idea, he would sit at his large, polished oak desk, making notes on a legal pad and coming at the idea from every angle possible to try and figure out why it wouldn't work. While he was doing that, I would be at the bank trying to get it financed.

Of course, there is merit to evaluating an idea carefully for the risk-and-reward ratio. But if you constantly focus on what could go wrong, you'll bury yourself under so much fear that you'll never accomplish anything. And the problem with most colleges is that they teach what I call the paralysis of analysis. They teach students how to figure out all the reasons why something won't work, instead of teaching them to go to work.

While I'm sure them are exceptions, it has generally been my experience that the more educated an individual is, the less likely it is that he or she will demonstrate the characteristics that lead to true financial independence. Business schools teach people how to get along in the corporate environment and do the nuts-and-bolts work of managing in a company. Engineering schools teach people how to be engineers. Journalism schools turn out reporters. Medical schools produce doctors.

Schools, whether at the primary, secondary, or post-secondary level, teach students how to perform at a job. That's okay if all you want out of life is a job, if you'll be content to go to work every day, struggling to put a little money aside so you can take a vacation every year, and hoping to have enough left over to support yourself in retirement. But if you want more, you must study the methods of wealthy people and learn how the rags-to-riches stories truly happened.

I talk to thousands and thousands of college graduates every year who tell me they bought into the "go to college, get a good job, and life will be rosy" idea, but today they're stuck in jobs they don't like and are worried about losing. They're straggling to pay bills, and they're searching for a way to get mom out of life. These people and countless others have changed theft fives by using just a few of the strategies you will learn in the following pages.

A point of clarification here: I am not advocating Mat we shut down our colleges and universities. Certainly when I'm sick I want a doctor who is highly trained in his specialty. I want an attorney who knows and understands the law. And I fully intend to send my own children to college. However, I have taught my children to think like high school dropouts, because I know that's the only way they will achieve their own financial security.

Remember, high school dropouts lack formal education, but they do not necessarily lack common sense. I am a high school dropout, but I'm also a national lecturer, I can convene articulately on a variety of supers other than business and investing, I've walton a number of books, and I am routinely called on by business and civic leaders when they need advice. Oh, yes, and I'm a multimillionaire.

There's a Bigger Reason for Wealth than the Money

I don't worship at the altar of the almighty dollar, and I'm not suggesting that you should, either. But having money makes your life easier, and having lob of money makes your life a lot easier.

As I look back, I can clearly see how I built the desire and belief that I should and could become wealthy. I can almost hear you groan, because most how-to books do the desire bit to death. You must have a burning desk, they say, a wrenching feeling in your gut that drives you to acquire wealth. It sounds as if you could eat a bowl of spicy chili and be on your way to your first million in a few hours.

Of course, we all want money and the niceties and freedoms having money provides. But just fantasizing about a bigger house, a sleeker car, and a membership at the country club won't get you those things. There's got to be a reason for the wealth that's bigger -- much bigger -- than the money itself.

Let me share how, for me, the desire for wealth grew from a tiny spark of an idea to a powerhouse of enemy, determination, and the guts to get it done.

I've already mentioned that my mother left my father and me when I was three years old. Because he believed I needed a mother, my father remarried. Unfortunately, the woman he chose mined out to be the stereotypical wicked stepmother. She was sweet and loving until they were married, then her attitude toward my father became one of grading accommodation. To me, she was negative and abusive. She told me repeatedly that I was no good, that I would never amount to anything, and that I would probably wind up spending most of my life in jail. She also physically abused me. I remember clearly how she held my hands over the time of a gas stove to discipline me.

This type of treatment is not only difficult for a child to deal with, it's overwhelming. When you hear over and over that you are a bad person, you come to believe it. I tried to take my problems to my father, but my stepmother convinced him that I was either exaggerating or lying. And he worked long, exhausting hours as an elevator mechanic. I was miserable, but I didn't feel I could burden him when he would come home tired and dirty from his dead-end job. So I bottled up my frustration, anger, and confusion, and focused on surviving.

My father was 39 when he died of heart disease. I lived with an aunt for about a year, then ran away from her home md moved in with my 18-year-old half-sister. She couldn't afford to support me, so I quit school and went to work. I lied about my age to get a job as a short-order cook from five o'clock in the morning to three in the afternoon. I'd clan up from the restaurant and dash across the street to put in a few hours as a minimum-wage telemarketer. Then, using a fake driver's license, I drove a taxi until one or two in the morning. I needed all three jobs, because none by itself would pay enough to cover my shoe of our living expense.

I lived this way, going from job to job, until I got the job in the slaughterhouse. I was working there when I met and married my wife, and she became my partner in our wealth-building strategies. Today one of our companies, the Whitney Leadership Group, employs nearly 100 people. Our corporate mission is to help people change their lives in a positive, productive way. In the process, I have made even mom money, and I have helped others do the same. But I was never really motivated by the dollars.

Sure, I wanted to be wealthy. I waned to be a millionaire. But it wasn't for the Rolex watch, although today I have one. It wasn't for the nice homes or expensive cars, although I have those, too. It took me years to understand what was driving me -- and it wasn't positive thinking. For me, it was simply this: If I could become a millionaire, it would make all the pain from the past go away. I would be somebody. I could show all those people, like my stepmother, who said I would never amount to anything, that they were wrong. Most importantly, I could give my family all the security and safety that I had never had and I so baby waned them to have.

To build the desire necessary to achieve wealth, you must unleash the energy of your own pain. Maybe your pain comes from someone telling you that you wouldn't ever succeed. Maybe your pain comes from imagining your children in a mediocre, financially deprived life. Whatever its source, you must find that pain, crystallize it, and understand what will make it go away.

Fortunately, somewhere along the way, my pain and animosity faded. I never gloated about my success to my stepmother. By the time I began achieving my financial goals, it wasn't necessary. And gradually the need to escape the pain of my unhappy childhood was replaced with the need to repeat the pleasure my achievements generated. The challenges and rewards of building wealth bec...

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