The Happy Prince and Othe Stories

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9780786106721: The Happy Prince and Othe Stories

"Swallow, Swallow, little Swallow," said the Prince, "will you not stay with me one night longer?" "It is winter," answered the swallow, "and the chill snow will soon be here. In Egypt the sun is warm" From his high vantage point, the glittering statue of the Happy Prince is the pride of city officials. But the Prince’s sapphire eyes are filled with tears because of the suffering he sees below. Stuck fast on his pedestal, there is nothing the gem-encrusted statue can do to help relieve the poor, until a little swallow stops to rest at his feet. The Prince persuades the bird to be his messenger, and to pluck out and carry one precious jewel after another to those in need. In order to survive the winter, the swallow must fly to a warmer place, but his love for the now-shabby Prince compels him to stay despite the consequences. Time after time, the brave little bird does all that is asked, until both he and the Happy Prince have nothing left to give. Oscar Wilde’s classic fairy tale of compassion and selflessness is given new life by Robin Muller’s exquisite illustrations in this special edition.

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From the Inside Flap:

Ilustrated by Charled Robinson

About the Author:

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born in Dublin in 1854. After his marriage to Constance Lloyd in 1884, he tried to establish himself as a writer, but with little initial success. However, his three volumes of short fiction, The Happy Prince (1888), Lord Arthur Savile's Crime (1891) and A House of Pomegranates (1891), together with his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), gradually won him a reputation as a modern writer with an original talent, a reputation confirmed and enhanced by the phenomenal success of his Society Comedies -- Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest, all performed on the West End stage between 1892 and 1895. Success, however, was short-lived. In 1891 Wilde had met and fallen in love with Lord Alfred Douglas. In 1895, when his success as a dramatist was at its height, Wilde brought an unsuccessful libel action against Douglas's father, the Marquess of Queensberry. Wilde lost the case and two trials later was sentenced to two years' imprisonment for acts of gross indecency. As a result of this experience he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol. He was released from prison in 1897 and went into an immediate self-imposed exile on the Continent. He died in Paris in ignominy in 1900.

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