How Stories Came into the World: A Folk Tale from West Africa (Folk Tales of the World)

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9780872264113: How Stories Came into the World: A Folk Tale from West Africa (Folk Tales of the World)

Once only Mouse knew, and kept to himself, the stories of how the world came to be until angry Lightning broke down Mouse's door and the stories escaped into the world.

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From School Library Journal:

Grade 1-4--Tikkatoo's Journey is an Eskimo folktale that will be unfamiliar to most readers (no sources are given). An ice spirit enters the heart of Tikkatoo's grandfather, making him ill; without his guidance the entire village suffers. Only Tikkatoo, the youngest and smallest, volunteers to get a flame of fire from the Sun to help his grandfather's frozen heart. The text lacks the economy of the best retellings, but the fascinating images may inspire children to dream up their own fantastic journeys. The plot is simple and not particularly compelling, but there is a sense of triumph in a small boy's showing up the disdainful but cowardly adult hunters. The art carries the book. Fanciful watercolor paintings feature decorative borders, and the locations and creatures Tikkatoo encounters are exotic and stir the imagination. The Moon-spotted dog, however, looks as though he has a skin disease. Delicate greens, blues, and beige pervade, with touches of brilliant oranges and yellows. In How Stories Came Into the World , Troughton combines five stories from West Africa under the mantle of the myth of Mouse, who weaves story pictures of all that she sees. Each story is approximately three spreads long; all deal with banishment or relocation. Although brief, all of the retellings but one are satisfying. The collection ends nicely, when Mouse's stories escape to wander the Earth. The lively cartoon-style art appears to be done in watercolor, ink, and perhaps wax crayons. Troughton's book is better for reading aloud, and it will appeal to older children with limited skills. --Marilyn Iarusso, New York Public Library
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Publishers Weekly:

Part of the Folk Tales of the World series, this intriguing picture book incorporates six West African creation myths into a single narrative. Included among the fanciful fables are the two Ekoi tales of how all the animals came to reside on Earth and the Mouse and her story children--the collection's unifying element. Three stories are rooted in the Efik Ibibio tribe: why the Sun and Moon live in the sky (when Water came to visit, it "overflowed the top of the roof"), why Hippo lives in the water and the origin of thunder and lightning. Rounding out the anthology is the Yoruba tale of the rubber girl--commonly told in America as the Tar Baby. Troughton builds on the strong plot lines in each of the brief retellings and weaves them into a single, almost seamless, episodic tale. Her arresting, primitive paintings vividly evoke African styles and images, and distinctive border designs differentiate cleverly each linked tale. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Troughton, Joanna
Published by Peter Bedrick Books
ISBN 10: 0872264114 ISBN 13: 9780872264113
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Cloud 9 Books
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Book Description Peter Bedrick Books. LIBRARY BINDING. Book Condition: New. 0872264114 New Condition. Bookseller Inventory # NEW6.0559643

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