Usury and the Public Debt in Florence (Studies and Texts)

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9780888441447: Usury and the Public Debt in Florence (Studies and Texts)

Money, politics and law were intimately linked in the merchant republics of medieval and Renaissance Italy. Nowhere was this more evident than in the realm of public finance. Beginning in the twelfth century, governments borrowed money from citizens to meet expenses that exceeded ordinary revenues; by 1350, most had converted their outstanding debts into permanent funds serviced by consumption taxes and levies on subject territories. Loans were usually compulsory, but ruling classes preferred them to taxes: not only did loans pay a return in the form of interest, but they could also be sold to recoup part of the lender's capital.
Despite the blessing of elites, deficit financing was highly controversial. In Florence, the creation of the funded debt was associated with social upheaval and remained a factor in political struggles for over a century. Debts in Florence and elsewhere also raised legal and moral questions that became the focus of growing controversy in the later Middle Ages. Lawyers and theologians rarely questioned the reliance of governments on debt, but many considered the payment of interest to government creditors a violation of the ban on usuary, which law and theology defined as any charge for a loan.
The defence of public debt offered by the Florentine lay canonist Lorenzo Ridolfi (1362-1443) in his Treatise on Usury was the most influential contribution to the debate and quickly became the standard canonical authority on the problem. Usury and Public Debt in Early Renaissance Florence presents an edition of the relevant portions of Ridolfi's treatise based on the autograph manuscript in the Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze and a running commentary on the text. The introduction examines Ridolfi's text in the light of earlier writers on the debt problem and situates it in the broader sociopolitical and cultural context of early Quattrocento Florence. This study will be of interest to legal historians, to historians of medieval political economy and economic thought, and to students of early Renaissance Florence.

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Armstrong, Lawren
Published by Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies (2003)
ISBN 10: 0888441444 ISBN 13: 9780888441447
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Book Description Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2003. Book Condition: Good. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. Bookseller Inventory # GRP89082890

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Armstrong, Lawren
Published by Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto (2003)
ISBN 10: 0888441444 ISBN 13: 9780888441447
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Book Description Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, Toronto, 2003. Hardcover. Book Condition: Good. Dust Jacket Condition: No Dust Jacket. Xiv, 460 pp. Glossary, bibliography, index citations, general index. Color frontic plate, The Tribute Money. Much text in Latin, else English. Cream cloth covers with black to the spine has some faint sign of library spine label, otherwise good, interior has library stamp on first free end paper, otherwise no library marks, clean and sturdy. Nice copy. Florentine lay canonist Lorenzo di Antonio Ridolfi finished writing his Tractatus de usuris in February 1404. Armstrong situtates Ridolfi in the sociopolitcal context of early Renaissance Florence and reviews the politically divisive history of the monte from its foundation in 1343-45 to the early 15th century, and argues that Ridolfi's apology for the monte should not be interpreted as an abstract theorectical exercise but rather as part of a broader elite strategy to generate consent to its political programme at a moment of instability and crisis. ; Studies and Texts; Vol. 144; 9 X 6 X 1 inches; 460 pages. Bookseller Inventory # 5962

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L. Armstrong
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Book Description Brepols Publishers 0, Versand an Institutionen auch gegen Rechnung. Hardcover. Book Condition: Verlagsfrisch New copy. Versand an Institutionen auch gegen Rechnung (illustrator). Verlagsfrisch New copy Studies and Texts ST 144 Usury and Public Debt in Early Renaissance Florence Lorenzo Ridolfi on the 'Monte Comune' L. Armstrong XIV+460 p., 156 x 234 mm, 2004 ISBN: 978-0-88844-144-7 Languages: English Hardback The publication is available. Retail price: EUR 85,00 Money, politics and law were intimately linked in the merchant republics of medieval and Renaissance Italy. Nowhere was this more evident than in the realm of public finance. Beginning in the twelfth century, governments borrowed money from citizens to meet expenses that exceeded ordinary revenues; by 1350, most had converted their outstanding debts into permanent funds serviced by consumption taxes and levies on subject territories. Loans were usually compulsory, but ruling classes preferred them to taxes: not only did loans pay a return in the form of interest, but they could also be sold to recoup part of the lender's capital. Despite the blessing of elites, deficit financing was highly controversial. In Florence, the creation of the funded debt was associated with social upheaval and remained a factor in political struggles for over a century. Debts in Florence and elsewhere also raised legal and moral questions that became the focus of growing controversy in the later Middle Ages. Lawyers and theologians rarely questioned the reliance of governments on debt, but many considered the payment of interest to government creditors a violation of the ban on usury, which law and theology defined as any charge for a loan. The defence of public debt offered by the Florentine lay canonist Lorenzo Ridolfi (1362-1443) in his Treatise on Usury was the most influential contribution to the debate and quickly became the standard canonical authority on the problem. Usury and Public Debt in Early Renaissance Florence presents an edition of the relevant portions of Ridolfi's treatise based on the autograph manuscript in the Biblioteca Nazionale di Firenze and a running commentary on the text. The introduction examines Ridolfi's text in the light of earlier writers on the debt problem and situates it in the broader sociopolitical and cultural context of early Quattrocento Florence. This study will be of interest to legal historians, to historians of medieval political economy and economic thought, and to students of early Renaissance Florence. Buch. Bookseller Inventory # 1932

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