My life as an Indian: The story of a red woman and a white man in the lodges of the Blackfeet

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9780917652387: My life as an Indian: The story of a red woman and a white man in the lodges of the Blackfeet

Book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1907. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER II THE RUSE OF A SAVAGE LOVER TT WAS agreed that I should join Berry in the autumn, when he would begin the season's trade with the Indians. He owned a large bull-train, with which he hauled freight from Fort Benton to the mining camps in summer, finding in that much more profit than in trading for the deer, elk, and antelope skins, which were about the only things of value that the Indians had to barter at that season. Buffalo robes were valuable only from animals killed from November to February inclusive. I did not wish to remain in Fort Benton; I wanted to hunt and travel about in this land of glorious sunshine and dry, clear air; so I bought a roll of bedding, large quantities of tobacco, and .44 rim-fire cartridges for my Henry rifle, a trained buffalo horse and saddle, and pulled out of the town with Sorrel Horse and his outfit. Perhaps if I had gone to the mines instead I would have done better in a financial way. More steamboats had arrived, the place was full of people bound for the gold fields, and there were many just from there with heavy sacks of gold-dust in their battered grips and greasy bags. They had made their stake, they were bound for the States; for "God's country," they said. God's country! If there was a more beautiful land than that of the great sunlit plains and mountains, grand and soul-inspiring in their immensity, I never saw it. I am glad I did not get the mining fever, for then I would probably never have learned to know them intimately. There are some things of far more value than gold. For instance, a life free from cares or duties of any kind; a life in which every day and every hour brings its share of pleasure and satisfaction, of excitement, of happily earned and well-enjoyed fatigue. Had I, too, gone to the placer field...

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About the Author:

J. W. Schultz (1867–1969) lived in relative obscurity prior to the penning of My Life as an Indian, which was a hit following its first publication in 1907 and has had lasting recognition as a work of unsurpassed insight.

Review:


A rip-roaring yarn and a dazzling glimpse into a vanished past.” The New York Times

James Willard Schultz was a master of storytelling in the Indian manner.” John C. Ewers, author of The Blackfeet: Raiders on the Northwestern Plains

A sensation-creating volume.” St. Petersburg Times

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