Basic Fluid Mechanics

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9780963605146: Basic Fluid Mechanics
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Basic Fluid Mechanics is an innovative new book on introductory fluid mechanics with important features unavailable in other similar books. This 742-page hardback text features the following:

This book has integrity in the sense that the book has a central theme revolving around the control-volume method, dimensional analysis, establishing logical problem-solving methods, and continually stressing the physics of fluid motion (as opposed to the disorganization that often grows out of a long series of revisions);

A 246-page, typeset study guide entitled Study Guide for Basic Fluid Mechanics (available separately, ISBN 0-9636051-9-4) complements the text---the Study Guide includes more than 150 problems with detailed solutions (as opposed to cluttering the main text with far too many examples solved in a sketchy manner).

A two-volume, 1,400-page, typeset solution manual is available to universities that adopt the book for course use---the solution manual has been developed by the author (as opposed to the common practice of having a graduate student prepare the solution manual);

It presents an integrated, three-pronged approach of analytical, experimental and computational (CFD) methods for analyzing fluid-flow problems (as opposed to appending a stand-alone chapter on CFD);

It includes 1,000 homework problems ranging from straightforward to truly challenging, and sometimes humorous---the problems are designed to stimulate abstraction (as opposed to problem solving by rote);

It includes numerous home experiments that students can perform with no special laboratory equipment;

It can be used for a two-course sequence in fluid mechanics;

It is priced below all of the major introductory fluid-mechanics texts---in some cases, by as much as $20.

As a teacher, Dr. Wilcox found the virtues of most modern fluid mechanics books to be diluted by deficiencies of various types, with a tendency toward teaching the student what to think rather than how to think. These flaws forced him to develop a detailed set of lecture notes based on his education at MIT and Caltech and his teaching experience at USC and UCLA. His students liked the lecture notes so much that they encouraged him, year after year, to write his own book. He has written that book and entitled it Basic Fluid Mechanics.

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About the Author:

Dr. David C. Wilcox, was born in Wilmington, Delaware. He did his undergraduate studies from 1963 to 1966 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics. From 1966 to 1967, he was employed by the McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Division in Long Beach, California, and began his professional career under the guidance of the late A. M. O. Smith. His experience with McDonnell Douglas focused on subsonic and transonic flow calculations. From 1967 to 1970, he attended the California Institute of Technology, graduating with a Ph.D. in Aeronautics. In 1970 he joined TRW Systems, Inc. in Redondo Beach, California, where he performed studies of both high- and low-speed fluid-mechanical and heat-transfer problems, such as turbulent hypersonic flow and thermal radiation from a flame. From 1972 to 1973, he was a staff scientist for Applied Theory, Inc., in Los Angeles, California. He participated in many research efforts involving numerical computation and analysis of fluid flows such as separated turbulent flow, transitional flow and hypersonic plume-body interaction.

In 1973, he founded DCW Industries, Inc., a La Canada, California firm engaged in engineering research, software development and publishing, for which he is currently the President. He has taught several fluid mechanics and applied mathematics courses at the University of Southern California and at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dr. Wilcox has numerous publications on turbulence modeling, computational fluid dynamics, boundary-layer separation, boundary-layer transition, thermal radiation, and rapidly rotating fluids. His scientific book publications include graduate-level texts entitled Turbulence Modeling for CFD and Perturbation Methods in the Computer Age. He has also published a political/philosophical manuscript entitled Cliches of Liberalism: Governing Through Insult, Confusion and Sound Bites. He is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and has served as an Associate Editor for the AIAA Journal.

Excerpt. Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Chapter 1. Introduction

The twentieth century ushered in the era of flight. The century had barely begun when, in 1903, the Wright brothers created the first heavier-than-air craft to fly under its own power. Since that historic flight, aviation has brought us faster and more efficient vehicles that permit mankind to ``soar with the eagles.'' Just 44 years later, Captain Charles (Chuck) Yeager demonstrated that it is possible to fly at speeds in excess of the speed of sound, an issue that was very much in doubt at the time. Captain Yeager's rocket-powered flight is often cited as the beginning of the space age.

The development of rockets has taken us beyond the confines of Earth's gravitational field. Those of us old enough to be tuned in, on color television broadcasting live from the Moon (an achievement in its own right), still remember the chills up and down our spine on July 20, 1969, when Neil Armstrong said, as he became the first man to set foot on the Moon, ``That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.'' Today, we see routine flights of the Space Shuttle performing missions in Earth orbit.

All of these achievements have been accomplished partly because of the vast accumulation of knowledge regarding the motion of fluids. The lifting and propulsive forces generated by the Wright Flyer have been thoroughly understood, and dramatically improved designs have evolved for modern aircraft. Theoretical studies of flows at supersonic speeds were conducted by Prandtl in the early part of the twentieth century, long before supersonic flight was even dreamed of. Those studies provided part of the basis for Captain Yeager's historic flight. Intense theoretical and experimental analysis in the 1950's and 1960's provided accurate predictions of the heating that a space vehicle would have to be protected against to permit safe reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. The emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has put the computer at our disposal to aid in the design of advanced vehicles such as the Space Shuttle.

But, while evidence of its importance and relevance to real-world problems is most obvious in the achievements with aircraft and rockets, fluid mechanics is not limited solely to such problems. The aerodynamic drag of automobiles in the 1990's is less than half the drag of models designed in the 1930's. The flow of gases through the engine of an automobile and even its air-conditioning system are routinely computed by today's auto builders.

A challenging area of fluid-mechanics research is the flow of blood through arteries and, ultimately, through the human heart. Developing a thorough understanding of blood flow through the body will surely help control and/or eliminate one of the most serious health hazards in today's world, namely, arteriosclerosis and heart disease.

Applications involving fluid motion extend to all branches of engineering. Aeronautical and mechanical engineers' interests range from basic studies of fluid motion, most notably turbulence, to everyday problems involving power generation, heating and ventilation, computer disk-drive design, etc. Civil engineers focus on interaction of aerodynamic forces with structures such as bridges and piers. Electrical engineers seek reduced costs in forming microchips, where acids must flow in a controlled manner to create desired patterns on silicon and other semiconductor materials. Chemical engineers must accurately determine reaction rates, a particularly acute problem when the velocity is high enough for the flow to be turbulent.

This book has been written with the object of introducing the reader to the exciting field of fluid mechanics. Relative to many popular texts on the topic, the approach taken is perhaps a bit more from the point of view of a physicist who really wants to use his knowledge to build everyday practical devices. Another way of saying this is the point of view is that of an engineer who shares Prof. Keith Stewartson's disdain for things that are ``unrigorous.'' Either way, the book strives for mathematical rigor throughout, without concealing the exciting physical concepts involved. So, read on with the understanding that the intent is to challenge your intellect, and to encourage you to hone your skills in mathematical and physical reasoning. Aiming high is a good strategy to follow if you truly want to reach for the stars!

To begin our study, we first note that the field we call fluid mechanics is the branch of physics concerned with fluid motion. Most substances found in nature can be thought of as either a solid or a fluid, where the two most common fluids are gases and liquids. The goals of this book are twofold. Our most important goal is to explain how to apply Newton's laws of motion to fluids. Our second goal is to present a brief overview of the general field of fluid mechanics. The first thing we need to do is define what we mean by a fluid.

1.1 Simplistic Definition of a Fluid

Anything that flows. Liquids and gases are the most obvious examples of substances that will flow. Traffic and glass are more subtle examples that can be treated as fluids, in the sense that their motion can be described with equations derived from fluid-mechanics principles.

The flow of traffic has been modeled as a fluid whose density (number of automobiles per unit distance) varies with speed. A particularly interesting application of traffic-flow theory is to the timing of traffic lights. In the 1960's and 1970's, many cities posted signs indicating the speed required to avoid catching a red light on a given route. The speed and timing of the lights were determined from observations of normal traffic flow and a theory developed from the mass and momentum conservation laws of fluid mechanics.

Glass flow is an even more subtle application of fluid mechanics. Although not obvious, glass is a fluid at room temperature, albeit with a very large coefficient of friction (viscosity). This is evident from windows in old structures such as the twin-tower Cathedral in Cologne, Germany. Some windows in the church are more than 200 years old, and show evidence that gravity has caused the glass to flow toward the bottom of each pane. Although it has been a painfully slow process, gravity is gradually overcoming the resisting frictional forces.

1.2 Rigorous Definition of a Fluid

A substance that cannot be in static equilibrium under the action of oblique stresses. On the one hand, if only normal forces such as pressure act, a fluid will adjust to the applied pressure with a change in volume...

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Other Popular Editions of the Same Title

9781928729310: Basic Fluid Mechanics (Third Edition)

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ISBN 10:  1928729312 ISBN 13:  9781928729310
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9781928729037: Basic Fluid Mechanics (Second Edition)

D C W ..., 2000
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