S Kalyanaraman Meluhha: Tree of life

ISBN 13: 9780991104802

Meluhha: Tree of life

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9780991104802: Meluhha: Tree of life

Hieroglyphs are sacred carvings incised, to convey rebus substantive messages in Meluhha. Symbols associated with divinities and tree of life are Meluhha sacred carvings. Many carvings relate to specific varieties of plants, buds, flowers which are associated with sacredness because they connote -- rebus -- metal artifacts of a kole.l ‘smithy/forge’ which is, kole.l ‘temple’. Archaeological evidences from Ancient Near East point to the practice of worship in temples of divinities associated with these hieroglyphs. Kabbalah of the Ancient Near East is a synonym of agama of Indian tradition with the roots found in Meluhha as a visible language. Both traditions venerate altars as models of temples. What lessons can be learnt from the evidences to delineate the roots of religious experiences of our ancestors? This inquiry primarily based on archaeologically attested artifacts is an incomplete religious inquiry. Kabbalah is a school of thought, a magnificent statement resulting from an intense inquiry into the nature of phenomena including living and non-living forms and cosmic order. One thought is apparent and central. There is some energy which permeates the universe and a name ws given to this energy, calling it by various appellations includes divine creation which can only be modeled on hieroglyphs. The hieroglyphs then become attributes of that divinity manifested in the cultural world order. When the king kneels in adoration in front of an altar which has as the center-piece a mere staff or pole, how did he vocalise the phenomenon which the sculpture has created? Is the sculpture an attempt at representing thought resulting from the inquiry? Or is it just a limited manifestation of the sculptor's life-experience? Or, is it a model of the ziggurat, the temple itself? Ziggurat as a temple is a leap in inquiry. It is a mere accumulation, a piling up of dhatu, earth forms containing minerals and what is left of minerals, may be ashes, after the processes in the crucible, smithy and forge. Or, is it a memory of accumulated memories bequeathed by ancestors in a life-continuum? The agama tradition in ancient India also has its roots in inquiry resulting in representation of attributes in human and non-human forms in an architectural model of a temple. The story of the agama and the kabbalah has to be fully told to understand the boundaries of the sacred observed and practised as religious experience. What is the difference between hakira (philosophy) and darash (inquire, seek‎) Is the darash traceable to the Indian traditions of dars'ana? How do Rabbinic meanings ( midrashic) explain the traditions evolved over time, narrated in Tanakh? Is there a cosmic law? The sememe dars'an has its root dRs', 'to see'. Is the seeing mere visual experience or an experience of the conscious mind? The beholding could be a series of flashes or glimpses seen by the inquirer. The cognate wor darash thus becomes a series of events, related or unrelated. events of conscious thought of the devotee. A fantastic metaphor emerges in the Vis'warupa, divine, wondrous manifestation holding many weapons, ornamented with celestial flowers and perfumes. Before such a form, the devotee kneels down in adoration, like Tukulti-Ninurta I (1243-1207 BCE), King of Assyria or like Arjuna in front of Sri Krishna as narrated in the Mahabharata and the Gita. Is there any significance or meaning assignable, from a narrative, which refers to artifacts of gypsum, strong copper and the Magilum boat of Meluhha fame, apart from Anzu who had stolen the tablet of destiny? It appears that Meluhhan artificer who created a writing system referred to strong copper by using the rebus metaphor of the sunflower, karaDa which also connoted 'strong copper' or hard alloy. When copper was hardened by alloying, it became 'useful' or 'meaningful' as a resource for making weapons and tools or as a resource for engaging in trade transactions using the Magilum boat.

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Dr. S. Kalyanaraman is Director, Sarasvati Research Center, President, Ramasetu Protection Movement in India and BoD member of World Association for Vedic Studies. His research interests relate to rediscovery of Vedic Sarasvati River, roots of Hindu civilization, decoding of Indus Script, National Water Grid and creation of Indian Ocean Community. He has a Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of the Philippines. He is a multi-lingual scholar versed in Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Sanskrit, Hindi. He was a senior financial and IT executive in Asian Development Bank, Manila, Philippines and on Indian Railways. His 18 publications include: Indian Lexicon - a multilingual dictionary for over 25 Indian languages, Sarasvati in 15 volumes, Indian Alchemy - Soma in the Veda, Indus Script Cipher, Rastram, Indian Hieroglyphs, Harosheth Hagoyim, Indus writing in ancient Near East, Indian Ocean Community, A Theory for Wealth of Nations, Sagan Finds Sarasvati (A novel), Meluhha – A visible language. He is a recipient of many awards including Vakankar Award (2000), Shivananda Eminent Citizens’ Award (2008) and Dr. Hedgewar Prajna Samman (2008). Website: http://sites.google.com/site/kalyan97

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Book Description Sarasvati Research Center, United States, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. Hieroglyphs are sacred carvings incised, to convey rebus substantive messages in Meluhha. Symbols associated with divinities and tree of life are Meluhha sacred carvings. Many carvings relate to specific varieties of plants, buds, flowers which are associated with sacredness because they connote -- rebus -- metal artifacts of a kole.l smithy/forge which is, kole.l temple . Archaeological evidences from Ancient Near East point to the practice of worship in temples of divinities associated with these hieroglyphs. Kabbalah of the Ancient Near East is a synonym of agama of Indian tradition with the roots found in Meluhha as a visible language. Both traditions venerate altars as models of temples. What lessons can be learnt from the evidences to delineate the roots of religious experiences of our ancestors? This inquiry primarily based on archaeologically attested artifacts is an incomplete religious inquiry. Kabbalah is a school of thought, a magnificent statement resulting from an intense inquiry into the nature of phenomena including living and non-living forms and cosmic order. One thought is apparent and central. There is some energy which permeates the universe and a name ws given to this energy, calling it by various appellations includes divine creation which can only be modeled on hieroglyphs. The hieroglyphs then become attributes of that divinity manifested in the cultural world order. When the king kneels in adoration in front of an altar which has as the center-piece a mere staff or pole, how did he vocalise the phenomenon which the sculpture has created? Is the sculpture an attempt at representing thought resulting from the inquiry? Or is it just a limited manifestation of the sculptor s life-experience? Or, is it a model of the ziggurat, the temple itself? Ziggurat as a temple is a leap in inquiry. It is a mere accumulation, a piling up of dhatu, earth forms containing minerals and what is left of minerals, may be ashes, after the processes in the crucible, smithy and forge. Or, is it a memory of accumulated memories bequeathed by ancestors in a life-continuum? The agama tradition in ancient India also has its roots in inquiry resulting in representation of attributes in human and non-human forms in an architectural model of a temple. The story of the agama and the kabbalah has to be fully told to understand the boundaries of the sacred observed and practised as religious experience. What is the difference between hakira (philosophy) and darash (inquire, seek ) Is the darash traceable to the Indian traditions of dars ana? How do Rabbinic meanings ( midrashic) explain the traditions evolved over time, narrated in Tanakh? Is there a cosmic law? The sememe dars an has its root dRs , to see . Is the seeing mere visual experience or an experience of the conscious mind? The beholding could be a series of flashes or glimpses seen by the inquirer. The cognate wor darash thus becomes a series of events, related or unrelated. events of conscious thought of the devotee. A fantastic metaphor emerges in the Vis warupa, divine, wondrous manifestation holding many weapons, ornamented with celestial flowers and perfumes. Before such a form, the devotee kneels down in adoration, like Tukulti-Ninurta I (1243-1207 BCE), King of Assyria or like Arjuna in front of Sri Krishna as narrated in the Mahabharata and the Gita. Is there any significance or meaning assignable, from a narrative, which refers to artifacts of gypsum, strong copper and the Magilum boat of Meluhha fame, apart from Anzu who had stolen the tablet of destiny? It appears that Meluhhan artificer who created a writing system referred to strong copper by using the rebus metaphor of the sunflower, karaDa which also connoted strong copper or hard alloy. When copper was hardened by alloying, it became useful or meaningful as a resource for making weapons and tools or as a resource for engaging in trade transactions. Bookseller Inventory # APC9780991104802

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Book Description Sarasvati Research Center, United States, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.Hieroglyphs are sacred carvings incised, to convey rebus substantive messages in Meluhha. Symbols associated with divinities and tree of life are Meluhha sacred carvings. Many carvings relate to specific varieties of plants, buds, flowers which are associated with sacredness because they connote -- rebus -- metal artifacts of a kole.l smithy/forge which is, kole.l temple . Archaeological evidences from Ancient Near East point to the practice of worship in temples of divinities associated with these hieroglyphs. Kabbalah of the Ancient Near East is a synonym of agama of Indian tradition with the roots found in Meluhha as a visible language. Both traditions venerate altars as models of temples. What lessons can be learnt from the evidences to delineate the roots of religious experiences of our ancestors? This inquiry primarily based on archaeologically attested artifacts is an incomplete religious inquiry. Kabbalah is a school of thought, a magnificent statement resulting from an intense inquiry into the nature of phenomena including living and non-living forms and cosmic order. One thought is apparent and central. There is some energy which permeates the universe and a name ws given to this energy, calling it by various appellations includes divine creation which can only be modeled on hieroglyphs. The hieroglyphs then become attributes of that divinity manifested in the cultural world order. When the king kneels in adoration in front of an altar which has as the center-piece a mere staff or pole, how did he vocalise the phenomenon which the sculpture has created? Is the sculpture an attempt at representing thought resulting from the inquiry? Or is it just a limited manifestation of the sculptor s life-experience? Or, is it a model of the ziggurat, the temple itself? Ziggurat as a temple is a leap in inquiry. It is a mere accumulation, a piling up of dhatu, earth forms containing minerals and what is left of minerals, may be ashes, after the processes in the crucible, smithy and forge. Or, is it a memory of accumulated memories bequeathed by ancestors in a life-continuum? The agama tradition in ancient India also has its roots in inquiry resulting in representation of attributes in human and non-human forms in an architectural model of a temple. The story of the agama and the kabbalah has to be fully told to understand the boundaries of the sacred observed and practised as religious experience. What is the difference between hakira (philosophy) and darash (inquire, seek ) Is the darash traceable to the Indian traditions of dars ana? How do Rabbinic meanings ( midrashic) explain the traditions evolved over time, narrated in Tanakh? Is there a cosmic law? The sememe dars an has its root dRs , to see . Is the seeing mere visual experience or an experience of the conscious mind? The beholding could be a series of flashes or glimpses seen by the inquirer. The cognate wor darash thus becomes a series of events, related or unrelated. events of conscious thought of the devotee. A fantastic metaphor emerges in the Vis warupa, divine, wondrous manifestation holding many weapons, ornamented with celestial flowers and perfumes. Before such a form, the devotee kneels down in adoration, like Tukulti-Ninurta I (1243-1207 BCE), King of Assyria or like Arjuna in front of Sri Krishna as narrated in the Mahabharata and the Gita. Is there any significance or meaning assignable, from a narrative, which refers to artifacts of gypsum, strong copper and the Magilum boat of Meluhha fame, apart from Anzu who had stolen the tablet of destiny? It appears that Meluhhan artificer who created a writing system referred to strong copper by using the rebus metaphor of the sunflower, karaDa which also connoted strong copper or hard alloy. When copper was hardened by alloying, it became useful or meaningful as a resource for making weapons and tools or as a resource for engaging in trade transactions. Bookseller Inventory # APC9780991104802

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Book Description Paperback. Book Condition: New. Paperback. Hieroglyphs are sacred carvings incised, to convey rebus substantive messages in Meluhha. Symbols associated with divinities and tree of life are Meluhha sacred carvings. Many carvings relate to specific varieties of plants, buds, flowers which are associated with sacredness because they connote -- rebus -- metal artifacts of a kole. l smithyforge which is, kole. l temple. Archaeological evidences from Ancient Near East point to the practice of worship in temples of divinities associated with these hieroglyphs. Kabbalah of the Ancient Near East is a synonym of agama of Indian tradition with the roots found in Meluhha as a visible language. Both traditions venerate altars as models of temples. What lessons can be learnt from the evidences to delineate the roots of religious experiences of our ancestorsThis inquiry primarily based on archaeologically attested artifacts is an incomplete religious inquiry. Kabbalah is a school of thought, a magnificent statement resulting from an intense inquiry into the nature of phenomena including living and non-living forms and cosmic order. One thought is apparent and central. There is some energy which permeates the universe and a name ws given to this energy, calling it by various appellations includes divine creation which can only be modeled on hieroglyphs. The hieroglyphs then become attributes of that divinity manifested in the cultural world order. When the king kneels in adoration in front of an altar which has as the center-piece a mere staff or pole, how did he vocalise the phenomenon which the sculpture has created Is the sculpture an attempt at representing thought resulting from the inquiry Or is it just a limited manifestation of the sculptors life-experience Or, is it a model of the ziggurat, the temple itselfZiggurat as a temple is a leap in inquiry. It is a mere accumulation, a piling up of dhatu, earth forms containing minerals and what is left of minerals, may be ashes, after the processes in the crucible, smithy and forge. Or, is it a memory of accumulated memories bequeathed by ancestors in a life-continuumThe agama tradition in ancient India also has its roots in inquiry resulting in representation of attributes in human and non-human forms in an architectural model of a temple. The story of the agama and the kabbalah has to be fully told to understand the boundaries of the sacred observed and practised as religious experience. What is the difference between hakira (philosophy) and darash (inquire, seek) Is the darash traceable to the Indian traditions of darsana How do Rabbinic meanings ( midrashic) explain the traditions evolved over time, narrated in Tanakh Is there a cosmic lawThe sememe darsan has its root dRs, to see. Is the seeing mere visual experience or an experience of the conscious mind The beholding could be a series of flashes or glimpses seen by the inquirer. The cognate wor darash thus becomes a series of events, related or unrelated. events of conscious thought of the devotee. A fantastic metaphor emerges in the Viswarupa, divine, wondrous manifestation holding many weapons, ornamented with celestial flowers and perfumes. Before such a form, the devotee kneels down in adoration, like Tukulti-Ninurta I (1243-1207 BCE), King of Assyria or like Arjuna in front of Sri Krishna as narrated in the Mahabharata and the Gita. Is there any significance or meaning assignable, from a narrative, which refers to artifacts of gypsum, strong copper and the Magilum boat of Meluhha fame, apart from Anzu who had stolen the tablet of destiny It appears that Meluhhan artificer who created a writing system referred to strong copper by using the rebus metaphor of the sunflower, karaDa which also connoted strong copper or hard alloy. When copper was hardened by alloying, it became useful or meaningful as a resource for making weapons and tools or as a resource for engag This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9780991104802

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