REPORT ON THE SETTLEMENT OF THE KOHAT DISTRICT IN THE PANJAB

 
9781130233476: REPORT ON THE SETTLEMENT OF THE KOHAT DISTRICT IN THE PANJAB

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 Excerpt: ... sort, disputes regarding the right of breaking up waste and claims to newly broken up lands are exceedingly rare. GOVERNMENT RAKH LANDS. 204. The Borakka tract near Mir Khweli, a small military grass rakh near Bahadar kot, and the Kbwarra and Zira jangles are the only Government Rakh lauds in the district. THE BORAKKA. 205. The term Borakka was originally applied to the whole of the waste mountain tract lying round the hill of Mir Khweli. A good deal of the Borakka has now been included within the boundaries of the adjoining villages of Ibrahimzai, Surgul, and Samari. The portion now reserved as Government rakh consists of the upper end of the valley lying north of Mir Khweli up to the crest of the surrounding hills, thus including the top of Mir Khweli itself. It contains some capital grazing lands and the people about Kohat depend on it to a great extent for their supply of grass. The lower lauds in the valley are held in lease under Government by Mian Umr Shah, who has founded a small village. The upper portion is uninhabited in the summer, but in the winter becomes a favorite encamping ground of the Ghalzais and Tirahis whose kirries fringe the skirts of the hills. The Ghalzais live in camel-hair tents. They leave their families here with their flocks while the men go away with their kafilas of camels for purposes of trade, generally to the salt mines. The Tirahis are mostly Malikdin Khels and Tirah Jawakis. They live in rough huts aud sheds which are repaired each year. They own very little cattle except a few pack-oxen aud make their livelihood by cutting grass, which they sell at Kohat. The Ghalzais usually number about 150 households. The Tirahis are not so numerous. The Ghalzais pay a grazing tax of Rs. 5 per 100 sheep and 8 annas for a full grown...

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G. Tucker
Published by RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1130233472 ISBN 13: 9781130233476
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Book Description RareBooksClub. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 98 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.2in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 Excerpt: . . . sort, disputes regarding the right of breaking up waste and claims to newly broken up lands are exceedingly rare. GOVERNMENT RAKH LANDS. 204. The Borakka tract near Mir Khweli, a small military grass rakh near Bahadar kot, and the Kbwarra and Zira jangles are the only Government Rakh lauds in the district. THE BORAKKA. 205. The term Borakka was originally applied to the whole of the waste mountain tract lying round the hill of Mir Khweli. A good deal of the Borakka has now been included within the boundaries of the adjoining villages of Ibrahimzai, Surgul, and Samari. The portion now reserved as Government rakh consists of the upper end of the valley lying north of Mir Khweli up to the crest of the surrounding hills, thus including the top of Mir Khweli itself. It contains some capital grazing lands and the people about Kohat depend on it to a great extent for their supply of grass. The lower lauds in the valley are held in lease under Government by Mian Umr Shah, who has founded a small village. The upper portion is uninhabited in the summer, but in the winter becomes a favorite encamping ground of the Ghalzais and Tirahis whose kirries fringe the skirts of the hills. The Ghalzais live in camel-hair tents. They leave their families here with their flocks while the men go away with their kafilas of camels for purposes of trade, generally to the salt mines. The Tirahis are mostly Malikdin Khels and Tirah Jawakis. They live in rough huts aud sheds which are repaired each year. They own very little cattle except a few pack-oxen aud make their livelihood by cutting grass, which they sell at Kohat. The Ghalzais usually number about 150 households. The Tirahis are not so numerous. The Ghalzais pay a grazing tax of Rs. 5 per 100 sheep and 8 annas for a full grown. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781130233476

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