How to become an office stenographer; a handy book intended for the untrained shorthand student who is ambitious to secure a good position without ... schools and high school commercial departmen

 
9781130547436: How to become an office stenographer; a handy book intended for the untrained shorthand student who is ambitious to secure a good position without ... schools and high school commercial departmen
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1919 Excerpt: ...simple rule may help you to solve the difficulty--When this word is dictated, and is used as an adjective, that is, as a word descriptive of the following word, it must be written-p-a-l. This is easily remembered by noting that the word "adjective" begins with the letter a, and that when the word "principal" is used as an adjective, you should always use the form that, has an " a" in it. Thus: "His principal reason was based on undisputed facts." If, on the other hand, the word is used in a sentence as a noun, e.g., "He was a man of high principle," it must be spelled with II an e. There are two apparent exceptions to the rule that when "principal" is used as an adjective, it must be spelled with an "a." These are when the word refers to the executive officer, or "Principal," of an educational institution, as well as when one is referring to the "principal" he may have deposited in a bank, and which is drawing interest. In neither of these cases, however, is the word really used as a noun. In the first example, the word " officer " is understood. "The Principal (officer, understood) conducted the final examinations." In the second instance, the word " sum," " amount," or " sum of money" is understood. "At the end of the first year, both principal (sum of money, understood) and interest amounted to over five thousand dollars." In all other cases, then, that is, when this word is used as a noun, write it-p-l-e. Two other words which give not only the stenographer, but the average letter-writer, much trouble are affect and effect. Even highly educated persons find it difficult, oftentimes, to determine when to us...

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