One hundred folksongs of all nations

 
9781130812114: One hundred folksongs of all nations

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 Excerpt: ...char „ afteristic surroundings, and a race of natural singers in its colored population," that something _akin to an especial folksong has developed, "distinctly different from the music of other nations." It undoubtedly presents a "graphic expression of a phase of American life," and for this reason, we are justified in regarding these Plantation melodies and songs as belonging to, and representative of, a particular race. At least they have been adapted as such by the white and black folk alike. It may be added, that these songs were written and composed in imitation of the original Negro Plantation Songs. Authorities. Elson: The National Music of America, pp. 267, 268. Bayley & Ferguson: Fifty Minstrel Songs, p. 36. Randolph: Patriotic Songs, p. 120. Brown and Moffat: Characteristic Songs, etc., p. 194. Bayley fcf Ferguson: S. Students' Songbook, p. 288. No. 99. Tenting on the old Camp Ground. United States Of America The words and music are by Walter Kittredge, and the song evidently relates to an episode in the Civil War. The sentiment is depressing rather than stimulating, but it found an echo in many American hearts, weary of internal strife. The music, though not a conscious imitation, possesses the characteristic rhythms of a Negro melody, and is a favorite song at the present day. The air has also been adapted as a hymn-tune, and is sung to a setting by the Rev. O. E. Murray, entitled "The Same Old Cause." Authorities. Randolph: Patriotic Songs, p. 193. Murray: The Singing Patriot, Nos. 89 and 98. No. 100. Dixie. United States Of AmerIca This popular song was written as a "walkaround" by Dan Emmett, who was born in Ohio in 1815. It was sung at a minstrel show in New York, a year or so before t...

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Sir Granville Bantock
Published by RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1130812111 ISBN 13: 9781130812114
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Book Description RareBooksClub. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. 32 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.1in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 Excerpt: . . . char afteristic surroundings, and a race of natural singers in its colored population, that something akin to an especial folksong has developed, distinctly different from the music of other nations. It undoubtedly presents a graphic expression of a phase of American life, and for this reason, we are justified in regarding these Plantation melodies and songs as belonging to, and representative of, a particular race. At least they have been adapted as such by the white and black folk alike. It may be added, that these songs were written and composed in imitation of the original Negro Plantation Songs. Authorities. Elson: The National Music of America, pp. 267, 268. Bayley and Ferguson: Fifty Minstrel Songs, p. 36. Randolph: Patriotic Songs, p. 120. Brown and Moffat: Characteristic Songs, etc. , p. 194. Bayley fcf Ferguson: S. Students Songbook, p. 288. No. 99. Tenting on the old Camp Ground. United States Of America The words and music are by Walter Kittredge, and the song evidently relates to an episode in the Civil War. The sentiment is depressing rather than stimulating, but it found an echo in many American hearts, weary of internal strife. The music, though not a conscious imitation, possesses the characteristic rhythms of a Negro melody, and is a favorite song at the present day. The air has also been adapted as a hymn-tune, and is sung to a setting by the Rev. O. E. Murray, entitled The Same Old Cause. Authorities. Randolph: Patriotic Songs, p. 193. Murray: The Singing Patriot, Nos. 89 and 98. No. 100. Dixie. United States Of AmerIca This popular song was written as a walkaround by Dan Emmett, who was born in Ohio in 1815. It was sung at a minstrel show in New York, a year or so before t. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781130812114

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