The elements of Anglo-Saxon Grammar, with copious notes, illustrating the structure of the Saxon and the formation of the english language; and A Grammatical Praxis with a literal english version

 
9781130875843: The elements of Anglo-Saxon Grammar, with copious notes, illustrating the structure of the Saxon and the formation of the english language; and A Grammatical Praxis with a literal english version
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1823 Excerpt: ...and Neuter As nouns denote the subjects of our discourse, so verbs affirm their accidents or properties. The former are the names of things, the latter what we say concerning them. These two, therefore, must be the only essential parts of speech: for to mental communication nothing else can be indispensably requisite, than to name the subject of our thoughts, and to express our sentiments of its attributes or properties. As the verb essentially expresses affirmation, without which there could be no communication of sentiment, it has been hence considered as the principal part of speech, and was, therefore, called by the ancient grammarians TO 'l'HMA, Veubum, verb, or the Ivoud, by way of eminence. The noun, however, is unquestionably of earlier origin. To assign names to surrounding objects would be the first care of barbarous nations; their next essay would be to express their most common actions, or states of being. This indeed is the order of nature, the progress of intellect. Hence the verb, in order and in importance, forms the second class of words in human speech; and, like the noun, is the fruitful parent of a great part of every vocabulary. See Crombie's Etymology and Syntax of the English Language, p. 89 and 110. The formation of Verbs is given in Chap. v. note 4. 4 It Is allowed that this division is not strictly correct, and free from objection; as Neuter signifies neither, that is, neither active nor passive; which, as we do not acknowledge a passive voice, is not properly applied. The term neuter is used to denote merely a state or posture: as to sleep, to sit, &c.: or if it express the action of its nominative case, it will not have an object or accusative case; as to walk, to run, Sec. An active verb, on the contrary, will always take an...

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