Memoirs of Serjeant Paul Swanston; being a narrative of a soldier's life, in barracks, ships, camps, battles, and captivity on sea and land with notices of the most adventurous of his comrades

 
9781130900415: Memoirs of Serjeant Paul Swanston; being a narrative of a soldier's life, in barracks, ships, camps, battles, and captivity on sea and land with notices of the most adventurous of his comrades
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850* Excerpt: ...was her darling; for you must know, there were three more than me, one elder brother and two younger sisters. I was an active lad, and for my age, a pretty good scholar. It was intended that I should become an apostle of the church, that church in the cause of which my father was a martyr. How far the preaching of the gospel reached in my mother's calculations I cannot say; but I am certain that the early appointment to a parsonage was well considered, for its certainty was the main argument used to convince me of the propriety of pursuing studies that would end in holy orders. I was accordingly sent to an academy, over which there presided a reverend gentleman, whose cams and printed circulars contained for a motto the text of scripture "train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it." This, for the circulars to parents was very well, and impressed them with a favourable opinion of the piety and wisdom that governed the establishment. But the pupils found several other texts engraved and written on various parts of the walls, and articles of school furniture which continually met their eyes, and which, with untiring assiduity on the master's part, were ever donged in their ears, namely, to the effect that those whom he loved he chastened, and that the rod was administerered in kindness, and so on--a philosophy, which was to me, who had never known aught but the most tender kindness, very hard of digestion. The whole place was a dismal prison, yet elegant in its appearance to visitors. It was an establishment professing to those who sought it for such a purpose, to be a school of correction for young prodigals--sons of pious and loving parents, who found their children needed to be whipped into virtuous an...

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