Observations on modern systems of fortification; including that proposed by M. Carnot, and a comparison of the polygonal with the bastion system to ... a tract on the naval, littoral, and internal

 
9781150957666: Observations on modern systems of fortification; including that proposed by M. Carnot, and a comparison of the polygonal with the bastion system to ... a tract on the naval, littoral, and internal
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1859 Excerpt: ... work and destroy the casemates which should defend its ditch. After this a lodgment may be made within the salient angle of the ravelin, for the purpose of breaching the caponniere in the main ditch, and silencing the artillery or musketry in the short flanks of the enceinte. The construction of the batteries presents nothing peculiar, and it may be observed that no batteries are required to ricochet the covered way, since there is none. The batteries intended to act by vertical fire against the caponnieres in the ditches, may be distant about 600 yards from those works, which is about the range of heavy artillery; or they may be formed at a less distance, as in the positions indicated by the numbers 1, 2, &c, to 7, in the second parallel.--See figs. 1 and 2, p. 162. Now, supposing the line of aim on a piece of battering ordnance to be directed to an object at that distance, the shot, after leaving the gun in the direction of the axis of the bore, would, in its descent, cross the line of aim at the place of the object: hence, if, between the gun and the object, any work, as a glacis, were interposed--provided such work were not higher than the trajectory of the shot--the effect of the shot on the object would be the same as if no work intervened. But, at 600 yards, the 18 and 24-pounder shot penetrate from 12 to 16 inches into masonry; therefore a continuous fire of such ordnance would soon destroy the walls of the caponnieres, weakened as they are by the number of embrasures formed in them. 167. This result is so much the more certain, as the main ditch, with the countersloping glacis, being about 50 yards wide, the side walls of a caponniere would be exposed to the fire of 8 or 10 guns: it cannot, therefore, be doubted that the place would be deprive...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want