Rifle Range Construction; A Text-Book to Be Used in the Construction of Rifle Ranges, with Details of All Parts of the Work

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9781230208060: Rifle Range Construction; A Text-Book to Be Used in the Construction of Rifle Ranges, with Details of All Parts of the Work

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ... 163. There are two kinds of flags Flags, Observa- used on rifle ranges: wind flags and tion Equipment danger flags. and Accessories. 164. The wind flags are made of different sizes, but the larger they are the better. A pennant 6 feet on the hoist and from 25 to 30 feet on the fly seems to give the greatest satisfaction. The point of a pennant will show light winds, and the size of the flag will give a better unit on which to base the force of the wind. 165. In the model rifle range (see frontispiece and chapter II, plate I, page 18-a) wind flags have been placed at every hundred yards at the dividing-line between the different sections of the range. This is a good rule to follow and will insure the range being properly flagged. One great trouble with numbers of fine ranges is that there are not sufficient wind flags to give all men an equal chance of judging the wind. Of course, in the interest of economy it may be necessary to cut down this number slightly. In this case they might be placed at every 200 yards instead of every hundred, but we do not recommend that the flags be placed on lines of fire too widely separated. It is not well to have the flags separated by more than 300 feet. 166. In case the range is located in a section of country where there are peculiar currents coming from different directions, it may be well to place flags some distance from the range so as to give men an opportunity of catching a change of wind before it strikes the range proper. Some ranges are not flagged with any attempt at regularity, but have flags placed where it is thought they will do the most good. This in order to save expense. This is not a wise plan to follow, but where only a few flags are to be used, they should be placed where there are...

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H C Wilson
Published by Theclassics.Us (2013)
ISBN 10: 1230208062 ISBN 13: 9781230208060
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Book Description Theclassics.Us, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: . 163. There are two kinds of flags Flags, Observa- used on rifle ranges: wind flags and tion Equipment danger flags. and Accessories. 164. The wind flags are made of different sizes, but the larger they are the better. A pennant 6 feet on the hoist and from 25 to 30 feet on the fly seems to give the greatest satisfaction. The point of a pennant will show light winds, and the size of the flag will give a better unit on which to base the force of the wind. 165. In the model rifle range (see frontispiece and chapter II, plate I, page 18-a) wind flags have been placed at every hundred yards at the dividing-line between the different sections of the range. This is a good rule to follow and will insure the range being properly flagged. One great trouble with numbers of fine ranges is that there are not sufficient wind flags to give all men an equal chance of judging the wind. Of course, in the interest of economy it may be necessary to cut down this number slightly. In this case they might be placed at every 200 yards instead of every hundred, but we do not recommend that the flags be placed on lines of fire too widely separated. It is not well to have the flags separated by more than 300 feet. 166. In case the range is located in a section of country where there are peculiar currents coming from different directions, it may be well to place flags some distance from the range so as to give men an opportunity of catching a change of wind before it strikes the range proper. Some ranges are not flagged with any attempt at regularity, but have flags placed where it is thought they will do the most good. This in order to save expense. This is not a wise plan to follow, but where only a few flags are to be used, they should be placed where there are. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781230208060

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2.

H C Wilson
Published by Theclassics.Us (2013)
ISBN 10: 1230208062 ISBN 13: 9781230208060
New Paperback Quantity Available: 10
Print on Demand
Seller:
The Book Depository
(London, United Kingdom)
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Book Description Theclassics.Us, 2013. Paperback. Book Condition: New. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: . 163. There are two kinds of flags Flags, Observa- used on rifle ranges: wind flags and tion Equipment danger flags. and Accessories. 164. The wind flags are made of different sizes, but the larger they are the better. A pennant 6 feet on the hoist and from 25 to 30 feet on the fly seems to give the greatest satisfaction. The point of a pennant will show light winds, and the size of the flag will give a better unit on which to base the force of the wind. 165. In the model rifle range (see frontispiece and chapter II, plate I, page 18-a) wind flags have been placed at every hundred yards at the dividing-line between the different sections of the range. This is a good rule to follow and will insure the range being properly flagged. One great trouble with numbers of fine ranges is that there are not sufficient wind flags to give all men an equal chance of judging the wind. Of course, in the interest of economy it may be necessary to cut down this number slightly. In this case they might be placed at every 200 yards instead of every hundred, but we do not recommend that the flags be placed on lines of fire too widely separated. It is not well to have the flags separated by more than 300 feet. 166. In case the range is located in a section of country where there are peculiar currents coming from different directions, it may be well to place flags some distance from the range so as to give men an opportunity of catching a change of wind before it strikes the range proper. Some ranges are not flagged with any attempt at regularity, but have flags placed where it is thought they will do the most good. This in order to save expense. This is not a wise plan to follow, but where only a few flags are to be used, they should be placed where there are. Bookseller Inventory # AAV9781230208060

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H. C. Wilson
Published by Theclassics.Us
ISBN 10: 1230208062 ISBN 13: 9781230208060
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Book Description Theclassics.Us. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 28 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.1in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: . . . 163. There are two kinds of flags Flags, Observa- used on rifle ranges: wind flags and tion Equipment danger flags. and Accessories. 164. The wind flags are made of different sizes, but the larger they are the better. A pennant 6 feet on the hoist and from 25 to 30 feet on the fly seems to give the greatest satisfaction. The point of a pennant will show light winds, and the size of the flag will give a better unit on which to base the force of the wind. 165. In the model rifle range (see frontispiece and chapter II, plate I, page 18-a) wind flags have been placed at every hundred yards at the dividing-line between the different sections of the range. This is a good rule to follow and will insure the range being properly flagged. One great trouble with numbers of fine ranges is that there are not sufficient wind flags to give all men an equal chance of judging the wind. Of course, in the interest of economy it may be necessary to cut down this number slightly. In this case they might be placed at every 200 yards instead of every hundred, but we do not recommend that the flags be placed on lines of fire too widely separated. It is not well to have the flags separated by more than 300 feet. 166. In case the range is located in a section of country where there are peculiar currents coming from different directions, it may be well to place flags some distance from the range so as to give men an opportunity of catching a change of wind before it strikes the range proper. Some ranges are not flagged with any attempt at regularity, but have flags placed where it is thought they will do the most good. This in order to save expense. This is not a wise plan to follow, but where only a few flags are to be used, they should be placed where there are. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781230208060

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