Boardwork; Or, the Art of Wigmaking, &C. a Technical Handbook Designed for the Use of Hairdressers, and Especially of Young Men in the Trade

 
9781231098219: Boardwork; Or, the Art of Wigmaking, &C. a Technical Handbook Designed for the Use of Hairdressers, and Especially of Young Men in the Trade
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1903 Excerpt: ...to the maker, but displays an art and skilfulness which to many is surprising." "The mount being divided into sections by means of the galloon which passes from front to back, side to side, enables the maker to sew on the net in parts, in preference to one entire whole. It is better to do this portion of the work in sections, not only because it is economical, but it is much more convenient. Commence (say) at the neck, by sewing the net to the innermost edge of the galloon, and you may arrange to cover one or both of the back divisions. Having sewn it along the edge securely, draw the net fairly tight, and stitch it to the nearest edge of the galloon which divides the front from the back. Cut off, but leave a sufficient margin to " herring-bone" afterwards. The front part of the wig may be covered in a similar manner. All edges of the galloon must be sewn to the net. I will now assume that the mount is covered except the points near the ears, the front peak, and it may be the nape of the neck. The angular or odd pieces of net will do exceedingly well for these. All being sewn to every available spot, the net tight and firm (not 'baggy'--by all means guard against that) and free edges neatly herring-boned to the galloon, the mount is complete." "Of course the hair selected for the top of the head about the front and crown should be longer than it is at the sides and in the neck, therefore two or three lengths of hair must be employed. A calculation ought to be made first, and the appearance, age of wearer, and so forth, taken into consideration. As a rule, the makers of wigs put too much hair in their manufactures. The lighter they are the better. Still, sufficient hair must be used to cover them, and much depends upon the finen...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want