Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology Volume 2; Prefatory note. Text, Le-Z. Addenda indices. I. Greek terms. II. Latin terms. III. German terms. IV. French terms. V. Italian terms

 
9781231217757: Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology Volume 2; Prefatory note. Text, Le-Z. Addenda indices. I. Greek terms. II. Latin terms. III. German terms. IV. French terms. V. Italian terms

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 Excerpt: ...parallelism is concerned--by Agassiz, and formulated, for the development of the embryo, by v. Baer (see v. Baku's Law). Haeckel interpreted the principle as a law of evolution. It is now very generally recognized as, in principle, true, although liable to much variation due to other forces and conditions. Modifications of it have been formulated in the 'law of Acceleration' (q.v.), and the theory of abbreviation, with that of Shoet Cuts (q. v.). Eimer (Organic Evolution, Eng. trans., 30) makes the following general statement regarding abbreviation: 'Every lower stage of the phyletic growth is abbreviated in ontogeny for the benefit of the newer higher.' Variations in the series have been recognized as arising from the necessary accommodation of the organism to changed environment, and the effects of mechanical forces, of unlike and unequal food-supply, &c. (Sedgwick). Moreover, it has been pointed out, by the present writer, that the rigid working of recapitulation must have been subordinated to the requirements of the creature's own survival--variations in recapitulation coming under the action of natural selection. Thus the rise of an infancy period is necessitated by the demands of later life in creatures in which plasticity and intelligence take the place of fixity and instinct. Such creatures are born helpless, and depend upon parental care, thus failing to pass through the stage of rich instinctive endowment which would correspond to that of their ancestors. So in the child we find few perfect instincts, and only those--such as sucking, walking reflex, &c.--which are of continued utility, or at least not of actual inutility, in the development of the future mature being whose life is mainly one of intelligent learning. Yet there are, it would...

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