The romance of engineering; the stories of the highway, the waterway, the railway, and the subway

 
9781231258149: The romance of engineering; the stories of the highway, the waterway, the railway, and the subway

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 Excerpt: ...up the ample bosom of the glen. The still lake, the wild surroundings are impressive. The great dam, commenced in 1881, is 161 feet high, 1,172 feet in length, and 120 feet thick at the baseFounded, literally, upon a rock, or rocks, by which, ere Nature burst the barrier, the old time lake had been confined within the valley, the dam remains cemented, a work which, in the ordinary course of events, should last for ever. At the end of this extensive lake, whose waters press the dam with a force of 167,000 tons, rises a Straining Tower, through which the rainwater is percolated, or strained, into the aqueduct which conveys the supply to Liverpool. This is a picturesque structure, and it is a curious fact that the useful is in this instance combined with the beautiful. The tower is connected with the shore by a little bridge. The water supplied is taken in below the surface of the lake, so that the chances of impurities becoming mingled with the supply is lessened; and this water is again passed through a screen of copper gauze. Any risks of the choking of the gauze is carefully obviated by a most ingenious but very simple process. When the gauze begins to be clogged and unable to perform its duties satisfactorily, the intake rings a bell, and summons an attendant, who shuts off the supply, raises the screen by hydraulic pressure, cleans the strainer, and sends the waste off.by a refuse-pipe. Thus the constant supply is obtained, and there is no lack of water. The lake is five miles long, half a mile wide, and nearly as deep as the dam. The number of inches of rain which fall in the district is considerable in the year. One "inch of rain "upon an acre is equal to 22,622 gallons, or 100 tons of water on an acre. As the average rainfall in this kingdom...

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