A Residence Among the Chinese; Being a Narrative of Scenes and Adventures During a Third Visit to China, from 1853 to 1856. Including Notices of Man

 
9781231306581: A Residence Among the Chinese; Being a Narrative of Scenes and Adventures During a Third Visit to China, from 1853 to 1856. Including Notices of Man

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 Excerpt: ...are thrown over the layers of dust, and, as each little globule of the fluid comes in contact with it, a certain number of particles adhere, and in the course of time are made into little round balls resembling the caper of commerce. But no one is, or ought to be, deceived by this. Small quantities of such teas are, no doubt, exported, but it must be with the knowledge and connivance of the foreigner himself, whom I shall not honour with the title of foreign merchant. And I shall be greatly surprised to find that such a clumsy fraud affects the respectable broker or dealer in Europe or America. During a late tour in India I was told on more than one occasion, on the authoritv of " Old Indians" who had been home, that it was next to impossible to get genuine tea in England, now that the East India Company had no control over the China trade; and that since the demand had so much increased, the Chinese were in the habit of supplying it by substituting the leaves of other trees and shrubs for that which is genuine. This idea is simply absurd: as a general rule the Chinese are doing no such thing; they have plenty of true tea in the country to supply all demands, were they twice as great as they are. And while it may be perfectly true that some unprincipled adventurers encourage the production of " lie teas " by buying them up, the great bulk of the teas exported are unadulterated with other articles. If sloe-leaves and beech-leaves, and other articles of that kind, are found in the teapot by the consumer, they are much more likely to have been manufactured in England than in China. The foreign merchants in China as a class are upright and honourable men, and quite incapable of lending themselves to frauds of this description. Besides, every...

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Rob Fortune
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ISBN 10: 1231306580 ISBN 13: 9781231306581
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Book Description RareBooksClub. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 106 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.2in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: . . . are thrown over the layers of dust, and, as each little globule of the fluid comes in contact with it, a certain number of particles adhere, and in the course of time are made into little round balls resembling the caper of commerce. But no one is, or ought to be, deceived by this. Small quantities of such teas are, no doubt, exported, but it must be with the knowledge and connivance of the foreigner himself, whom I shall not honour with the title of foreign merchant. And I shall be greatly surprised to find that such a clumsy fraud affects the respectable broker or dealer in Europe or America. During a late tour in India I was told on more than one occasion, on the authoritv of Old Indians who had been home, that it was next to impossible to get genuine tea in England, now that the East India Company had no control over the China trade; and that since the demand had so much increased, the Chinese were in the habit of supplying it by substituting the leaves of other trees and shrubs for that which is genuine. This idea is simply absurd: as a general rule the Chinese are doing no such thing; they have plenty of true tea in the country to supply all demands, were they twice as great as they are. And while it may be perfectly true that some unprincipled adventurers encourage the production of lie teas by buying them up, the great bulk of the teas exported are unadulterated with other articles. If sloe-leaves and beech-leaves, and other articles of that kind, are found in the teapot by the consumer, they are much more likely to have been manufactured in England than in China. The foreign merchants in China as a class are upright and honourable men, and quite incapable of lending themselves to frauds of this. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781231306581

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