Concealing-Coloration in the Animal Kingdom; An Exposition of the Laws of Disguise Through Color and Pattern: Being a Summary of Abbott H. Thayer's Di

 
9781231319765: Concealing-Coloration in the Animal Kingdom; An Exposition of the Laws of Disguise Through Color and Pattern: Being a Summary of Abbott H. Thayer's Di
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 Excerpt: ...are terrestrial and fossorial, and almost hairless. But they are partially protected from their enemies by a hard, annulated shell, as well as by their prodigious digging-powers. Some species roll up into almost invulnerable balls, as do their African and Asiatic relatives, the armor-scaled pangolins (Manidte). Both these families, besides being chiefly nocturnal, belong perhaps to the group of specially protected animals (although their armament is purely and passively defensive, like that of tortoises, and unlike that of porcupines), and their protective coloration accordingly is meager and irregular. Armadillos are earth-and sand-colored above, and their broad, shelly roof, somewhat counter shaded, extends so far down over the sides as almost wholly to hide the shieldless and more or less hairy under parts, which, in conformity with the common law, are often decidedly paler in color. It is doubtful, though, whether the ventral paleness has in this case much significance beyond the lax and aborted pigmentation of a surface almost never exposed to view. But armadillos' heads and tails are always (?) counter shaded. The Myrmecophagida, or American Ant-eaters, are all fully furred, and, despite their nocturnal habits, obliteratively colored. Only three species are known, namely, the Great Ant-eater (Myrmecophaga jubata), the middlesized Tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla), and the Little Ant-eater (Cyclothurus didactylus). Myrmecophaga is strictly terrestrial, but does not burrow; Tamandua is chiefly arboreal, and Cyclothurus strictly so, being halfway to the sloths in habits and demeanor. The two larger kinds lack diurnal obliterative shading, but are equipped with powerful ruptive patterns of black, white and gray. The exquisite, pale-brown furry coat of the ...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want