The ferro-concrete style; reinforced concrete in modern architecture, with four hundred illustrations of European and American ferro-concrete design

 
9781232047513: The ferro-concrete style; reinforced concrete in modern architecture, with four hundred illustrations of European and American ferro-concrete design
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 Excerpt: ...would have to be ascertained by tests. Iron-particles which have been used to create rust-spots in imitation of shelly limestone might serve the purpose. DECORATIVE INSERTS Intarsia. Concrete-intarsia is produced by fastening strips of wood, gypsum, or metal on the interior of the forms according to the lines of the ornament; when the concrete has set, the forms are removed and the grooves are filled with colored cement mortars. Tile. Colored tiles form a very effective (34) Flat reinforcing bars were bent into parabolas to follow the lines of maximum tensile stresses in the early days of reinforced concrete, according to W. W. Clifford ("The Architectural Forum", May 1922, p. 178). surface decoration (Fig. Ill, 141). The thinner tiles are usually placed before pouring--for ceilings directly on the forms, and for vertical surfaces glued to paper or to canvas or set in forms with clay. Tile is also laid in precast concrete slabs which are set into recesses created by the formwork. O. C. Hering states that when unglazed tiles are used their backs should be soaked in water and their face oiled as protection against efflorescence--an unnecessary precaution with glazed tile. A piece of felt placed on the face of the tile also protects from surface staining by wet concrete. The back of a tile should never be oiled as it would lose its porosity and power of adhesion. The H. S. Dawson storage warehouses in Stockton, Cal. (Fig. 112 115) show a successful application of tile and paint concerning which "Concrete"85 states the following: "Stucco consisting of 1 part white cement (Atlas) and 2 parts Monterey white sand mixed to a consistency of a thick cream was whipped on to the building with brushes after a brown coat of cement mortar placed o...

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want