The South Sea islanders and the Queensland labour trade Volume 1; a record of voyages and experiences in the western Pacific, from 1875 to 1891

 
9781232224228: The South Sea islanders and the Queensland labour trade Volume 1; a record of voyages and experiences in the western Pacific, from 1875 to 1891
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 Excerpt: ...of European settlement going back 80 years. But across the southern end of the peninsula, only some 50 miles airline from the New Guinea Club, lay a 500 square mile tract of mountainous virgin bush, shunned by whites and indigenes alike-Neither the enterprising Tolais, the primitive Bainings of the adjoining ranges to the north, the timid Sulkas and Timoip hunters to the south-east, nor the Nakanai fishermen to the south-west, ever dared venture into this area. Presumably, Jap bands moved through it during their long overland marches in 1944-45, but they left few signs of their passing and no record of any native contacts. This was the Mokolkol country, notorious since German times as the domain of a mysterious tribe of elusive and wanton killers. Fantastic tales were told of these people. Contrary to the normal pattern of pre-contact New Guinea society, in which perennial feuding between fairly static village communities is usually punctuated with intervals of uneasy amity, involving common feasts, exchanges of hostages, barter, and inter-marriage, the Mokolkols apparently had no fixed place of abode, and, quite definitely, no social or trading relations with any other group The New Guinea rain-forest has insufficient game and edible fruits to support humans practising a hunting and collecting economy, but the Mokolkols had apparently come close to achieving this. Their hidden gardens were small, scattered, and apparently evoked none of the religious and sentimental attachments that bind most Papuo-Melanesians to their land. Once discovered by outsiders, their cultivation patches were abandoned and never re-visited. A second peculiarity, in a land where the bow, sling, spear and club are conventional indigenous weapons, was the Mokolkol predilection for ax...

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