African-American Inventors: George Washington Carver, List of African-American Inventors and Scientists, Jesse Russell, Elijah McCoy

 
9781233098378: African-American Inventors: George Washington Carver, List of African-American Inventors and Scientists, Jesse Russell, Elijah McCoy

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 29. Chapters: George Washington Carver, List of African-American inventors and scientists, Jesse Russell, Elijah McCoy, Madam C. J. Walker, Patricia Bath, Henry Cecil McBay, John Parker, Garrett Morgan, Lewis Howard Latimer, Frederick McKinley Jones, George Robert Carruthers, Walter Lincoln Hawkins, Granville Woods, Kunle Olukotun, James Edward Maceo West, Lonnie Johnson, George Edward Alcorn, Jr., Benjamin Bradley, Mary Dixon Kies, David Crosthwait, Ben Montgomery, Jerry Lawson, Emmett Chappelle, Jan Ernst Matzeliger, Mark Dean, Sarah E. Goode, George F. Carruthers, Richard Spikes, Samuel R. Scottron, Otis Boykin, Henry Blair, Marie Van Brittan Brown. Excerpt: George Washington Carver (January 1864 - January 5, 1943), was an American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor. The exact day and year of his birth are unknown; he is believed to have been born into slavery in Missouri in January of 1864. Carver's reputation is based on his research into and promotion of alternative crops to cotton, such as peanuts, soybeans and sweet potatoes, which also aided nutrition for farm families. He wanted poor farmers to grow alternative crops both as a source of their own food and as a source of other products to improve their quality of life. The most popular of his 44 practical bulletins for farmers contained 105 food recipes using peanuts. He also developed and promoted about 100 products made from peanuts that were useful for the house and farm, including cosmetics, dyes, paints, plastics, gasoline, and nitroglycerin. He received numerous honors for his work, including the Spingarn Medal of the NAACP. During the Reconstruction-era South, monoculture of cotton depleted the soil in many areas. In the early 20th century, the boll weevil destroyed much of the cotton crop, and planters and farm workers suffered. Carver's work on peanuts ...

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