Invasive plant species in Europe: Japanese knotweed, Ailanthus altissima, Robinia pseudoacacia, List of invasive species in Europe

 
9781233128471: Invasive plant species in Europe: Japanese knotweed, Ailanthus altissima, Robinia pseudoacacia, List of invasive species in Europe

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 26. Chapters: Japanese knotweed, Ailanthus altissima, Robinia pseudoacacia, List of invasive species in Europe, Honey locust, Caulerpa taxifolia, Introduced species in the British Isles, Giant Hogweed, Carpobrotus edulis, Elodea canadensis, Rhododendron ponticum, Prunus laurocerasus, Oxalis pes-caprae, Himalayan Balsam, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Myriophyllum aquaticum, Buddleja davidii, Hydrocotyle ranunculoides, Amorpha fruticosa, Crassula helmsii. Excerpt: Ailanthus altissima (pronounced ), commonly known as tree of heaven, ailanthus, or in Standard Chinese as chouchun (Chinese: ; pinyin: chòuchūn; literally "malodorous tree"), is a deciduous tree in the Simaroubaceae family. It is native to both northeast and central China and Taiwan. Unlike other members of the genus Ailanthus, it is found in temperate climates rather than the tropics. The tree grows rapidly and is capable of reaching heights of 15 metres (49 ft) in 25 years. However, the species is also short lived and rarely lives more than 50 years. In China, the tree of heaven has a long and rich history. It was mentioned in the oldest extant Chinese dictionary and listed in countless Chinese medical texts for its purported ability to cure ailments ranging from mental illness to baldness. The roots, leaves and bark are still used today in traditional Chinese medicine, primarily as an astringent. The tree has been grown extensively both in China and abroad as a host plant for the ailanthus silkmoth, a moth involved in silk production. Ailanthus has become a part of western culture as well, with the tree serving as the central metaphor and subject matter of the best-selling American novel A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. The tree was first brought from China to Europe in the 1740s and to the United States in 1784. It was one of the first trees brought west during a t...

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