Ventilation: Fume Hood, Mechanical Fan, Natural Ventilation, Energy Recovery Ventilation, Heat Recovery Ventilation, Centrifugal Co

 
9781233172061: Ventilation: Fume Hood, Mechanical Fan, Natural Ventilation, Energy Recovery Ventilation, Heat Recovery Ventilation, Centrifugal Co
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 28. Chapters: Fume hood, Mechanical fan, Natural ventilation, Energy recovery ventilation, Heat recovery ventilation, Centrifugal compressor, Biosafety cabinet, Displacement ventilation, Underfloor air distribution, Grille, Blower door, Room air distribution, Infiltration, Vented balance safety enclosure, Smoke dampers, Diffuser, Air changes per hour, Laminar flow cabinet, Air sock, Trickle vent, Ventilation shaft, Duct sealing, Mixed Mode Ventilation. Excerpt: Ventilating (the V in HVAC) is the process of "changing" or replacing air in any space to provide high indoor air quality (i.e. to control temperature, replenish oxygen, or remove moisture, odors, smoke, heat, dust, airborne bacteria, and carbon dioxide). Ventilation is used to remove unpleasant smells and excessive moisture, introduce outside air, to keep interior building air circulating, and to prevent stagnation of the interior air. Ventilation includes both the exchange of air to the outside as well as circulation of air within the building. It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. Methods for ventilating a building may be divided into mechanical/forced and natural types. "Mechanical" or "forced" ventilation is used to control indoor air quality. Excess humidity, odors, and contaminants can often be controlled via dilution or replacement with outside air. However, in humid climates much energy is required to remove excess moisture from ventilation air. Kitchens and bathrooms typically have mechanical exhaust to control odors and sometimes humidity. Factors in the design of such systems include the flow rate (which is a function of the fan speed and exhaust vent size) and noise level. If ducting for the fans traverse unheated space (e.g., an attic), the ducting should be insulated as well to prevent condensatio...

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