Report of His Mission to South America in 1877-78, to Collect Plants of the Quinine Bark Tree Known as Calisaya of Santa Fe, or Soft Columbian, on

 
9781235609114: Report of His Mission to South America in 1877-78, to Collect Plants of the Quinine Bark Tree Known as Calisaya of Santa Fe, or Soft Columbian, on
View all copies of this ISBN edition:
 
 
Reseņa del editor:

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 Excerpt: ... workmen; but even this class of individuals is not so useful if previously they have been employed for any length of time about towns, or have been with the guerillas or State militias, as, in either case, much of the time is spent in gambling tricks and drinking at little resorts, where the most astonishing habits of pilfering and dishonesty are invariably picked up. Return Journey with the Plants. On the 27th of January 1878, having previously packed the plants, I commenced the homeward journey. The mule owner brought with him a strong lad as peon, to assist in loading and unloading the beasts and other duties. Before leaving I asked if he had been fevered, as a person who had so suffered would have been preferable for the unhealthy districts we were about to travel through. His master said he had not, but had been to several warm parts of the valley. We brought eight animals, five of which were harnessed, the remaining three being intended for any mishaps that might occur. After a brief stay at Tunia to procure some requirements, we pursued our journey, and on the evening of the 31st encamped on a height above the river Ovejas! We brought with us a tent, as we resolved to avoid all dwellings, which, owing to the travelling to and fro of revolutionary guerillas, were mostly in a ruined state, and swarming with pests and vermin, whilst the grazing land around was eaten down to the roots. Next morning the peon complained of being unwell, and it was soon evident that he had caught the fever of the ravine, to which many people are liable when they remain for the night anywhere within a mile of the Ovejas river. Water was not to be had at any great distance from the river, which was the reason we stayed in this locality. During the succeeding days we travelle...

"About this title" may belong to another edition of this title.

(No Available Copies)

Search Books:



Create a Want

If you know the book but cannot find it on AbeBooks, we can automatically search for it on your behalf as new inventory is added. If it is added to AbeBooks by one of our member booksellers, we will notify you!

Create a Want