Scripture Zoology, Intended to Illustrate Those Passages in the Bible, in Which Allusions Are Made to Objects in Animated Nature

 
9781235685989: Scripture Zoology, Intended to Illustrate Those Passages in the Bible, in Which Allusions Are Made to Objects in Animated Nature
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 18??. Excerpt: ... SCRIPTURE ZOOLOGY. WILD QUADRUPEDS. THE LION. The name of this noble animal, which has been styled the king of the forest, is frequently employed by the Sacred Writers to give force and energy to those passages in the Holy Scriptures, which are designed either to inspire the righteous with confidence in the Almighty protection, in times of peril and necessity, or to impress the minds of the wicked with a salutary terror of the Divine judgments. The inspired penmen also make use of the peculiar characteris itics of this animal to exhibit, at one time, the exaltation of God's chosen people, and at another, the violent efforts of their enemies to accomplish their ruin. Thus the prophet Joel (i. 6,) employs the lion, on account of his destructive qualities, as a suitable figure for representing the horrible ravages committed by the desolating sword of war--" A nation is come up upon my land, whose teeth are the teeth of a lion, and he hath the cheek-teeth of a great lion;" while St. Peter designates the grand adversary of the human race as "a roaring lion, walking about, and seeking whom he may de, vour." 1 Peter v. 8. A brief consideration of the figure, character, and manners of this animal, will enable us to mark with what closeness and accuracy l the sacred writers have copied nature, and the great suitableness and propriety of their allusions. At the present day, the largest and fiercest lions are V t to be found-hi.Africa, and In the tropical regions of Asia; but in former ages they appear to have been more widely diffused. The length of a large lion is generally from eight to nine feet; some appear to have been found still larger, as Mr. Pringle, a Scotch settler at the Cape of Good Hope, informs us that he was present at the destruction of a lion in 1...

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