The Gros Mousqueton Diplomatique; Or Diplomatic Blunderbuss. Containing, Citizen Adet's Notes to the Secretary of State. as Also His Cockade Proclamat

 
9781235715167: The Gros Mousqueton Diplomatique; Or Diplomatic Blunderbuss. Containing, Citizen Adet's Notes to the Secretary of State. as Also His Cockade Proclamat

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1796. Excerpt: ... The following note was publijhed in Bache's Gazette of 2Jl 08. 1796, without the approbation or con' sent of the American Government AUTHENTIC. THE undersigned minister plenipotentiary of the French Republic, in conformity to the orders of his government, has the honour of transmitting to the secretary of state of the United States, a resolution taken by the executive directory of the French Republic, on the 14th Messidor, 4th year, relative to the conduct which the ships of war of the Republic are to hold towards neutral vessels. The Hag of the Republic will treat the flag of neutrals in the same manner as they shall surfer it to be treated by the English.. B The sentiments which the American government have manifested to the undersigned minister plenipotentiary, do not permit him to doubt, that they will see in its true light, this measure, as far as it may concern the United States, that it is dictated by imperious circumstances, and approved by justice. Great Britain, during the war she has carried on against the Republic, has not ceased using every means in her power to add to that scourge, scourges still more terrible. She has used the well known liberality of the French nation to the detriment of that nation. Knowing how faithful France has always been in the observance of her treaties--knowing that it was a principle of the Republic to respect the flag of all nations, the British government, from the beginning of the war, has caused neutral vessels, and in particular American vessels, to be detained, taking them into their ports, and dragged from them Frenchmen and French property.--France, bound by a treaty with the United States, could find only a real disadvantage in the articles of that treaty, which caused to be respected as American property...

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