Proceedings of the Senate Sitting for the Trial of William W. Belknap, Late Secretary of War, on the Articles of Impeachment Exhibited by the House of

 
9781235775482: Proceedings of the Senate Sitting for the Trial of William W. Belknap, Late Secretary of War, on the Articles of Impeachment Exhibited by the House of

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1876 Excerpt: ... coming to it squarely and disconnected with everything else, I feel bound to say that the testimony in its support is fatally deficieut. There is no testimony whatever that there was any contract express or implied with the accused before Evans was appointed or at the time the promise of appointment was made to Marsh. Nor is there any that subsequent thereto any act or decision of the Secretary was influenced by the giving or receiving of this money, nor that he received it with the intent to be thus influenced. It may have been ever so immoral and reprehensible for one in the position of the respondent to take this money, but that is not the question. With this I have nothing now to do. Was it legal bribery? for it is with this we have to do. Marsh and Evans both most emphatically deny, so far as they are aware, any guilty knowledge, or purpose, or intent, on the part of the Secretary; and though I might gran t that it is inore than probable and indeed admit that it is almost if not quite certain that he knew that Evans was paying Harsh money and knew of their arrangement or contract, whafrwould that avail in the absence of evidence to satisfy me that he received the money with intent that his action should be influenced by it i It matters not, let it be borne in mind, what Marsh's motives may have been so long as it was unknown to respondent or so long as he was not influenced by these payments or remittances, or rather in the absence of affirmative and satisfactory evidence that there was the intent to be influenced in his official action by the same. If it be said that a public officer should not be allowed to receive gifts, presents, or the like from any one, much less from any one then or afterward appointed to place by him, that it is contrary to pub...

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William Worth Belknap
Published by General Books
ISBN 10: 1235775488 ISBN 13: 9781235775482
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Book Description General Books. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 728 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 1.4in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 Excerpt: . . . coming to it squarely and disconnected with everything else, I feel bound to say that the testimony in its support is fatally deficieut. There is no testimony whatever that there was any contract express or implied with the accused before Evans was appointed or at the time the promise of appointment was made to Marsh. Nor is there any that subsequent thereto any act or decision of the Secretary was influenced by the giving or receiving of this money, nor that he received it with the intent to be thus influenced. It may have been ever so immoral and reprehensible for one in the position of the respondent to take this money, but that is not the question. With this I have nothing now to do. Was it legal bribery for it is with this we have to do. Marsh and Evans both most emphatically deny, so far as they are aware, any guilty knowledge, or purpose, or intent, on the part of the Secretary; and though I might gran t that it is inore than probable and indeed admit that it is almost if not quite certain that he knew that Evans was paying Harsh money and knew of their arrangement or contract, whafrwould that avail in the absence of evidence to satisfy me that he received the money with intent that his action should be influenced by it i It matters not, let it be borne in mind, what Marshs motives may have been so long as it was unknown to respondent or so long as he was not influenced by these payments or remittances, or rather in the absence of affirmative and satisfactory evidence that there was the intent to be influenced in his official action by the same. If it be said that a public officer should not be allowed to receive gifts, presents, or the like from any one, much less from any one then or afterward appointed to place by him, that it is contrary to pub. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781235775482

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