A practical manual of house-painting, graining, marbling and sign-writing; Containing full information on the processes of house-painting in oil and ... the principles of decorative art, a cour

 
9781236087249: A practical manual of house-painting, graining, marbling and sign-writing; Containing full information on the processes of house-painting in oil and ... the principles of decorative art, a cour
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 Excerpt: ...we may say as yet the general way of gilding, consists in the gilder taking the leaves from the book of goldand placing them on the "cushion." The gilder's cushion corresponds with the painter's palette. It is a small board covered first with baize or cloth, and afterwards with wash-leather, which is tightly stretched over it. This cushion is supplied with a loop underneath into which the thumb passes, the cushion resting on the hand in much the same way as a palette does. There is also an edging or wall made of parchment on three sides of the cushion, and this in some degree prevents the gold-leaf blowing away. The gold-leaf, having been deposited in the cushion, is ' puffed" flat, that is, it is generally blown upon until it is perfectly smooth; but this is more easily said than done, for if the puff be in the slightest degree too forcible the whole leaf will, in the most vexatious manner, huddle itself up in the corner of the cushion, defying all attempts of the beginner, at least, to flatten it out, and as this is likely to take place when a fair amount of wind is blowing--certainly in the open air--the difficulty of the operation can well be imagined. Some gilders surround themselves with a kind of awning, in order to be protected from the currents of wind, and this has led to the absurd idea that they desired to keep the process by which they worked secret; whereas, when the gilding is being done by either of the old-fashioned methods, such a screen is absolutely necessary. The leaf of gold, having then been successfully flattened out, is next cut into pieces of the desired size by means of a long thin knife, the edge of which is very smooth. Each piece is then taken up with the "tip." This is a very light and thin brush, made...

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