9781236102744: The Train Dispatcher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: ...as it can be done, when it is considered that we have no mechanical devices, no hold whatever on those with whom we transmit orders. What we want is more than others have, and do more than others do; stand apart and ahead in our vocation; incite the confidence of the traveling public. This would greatly increase travel, and make us worth more. A thorough organization and a strong one is elevating. We see that on every hand. Let us be the giant that has been sleeping unknown and undisturbed (because we have been hard to disturb, not because we have not been trampled on with a vengeance). Wake up now, and let us give the inhabitants of this glorious nation what they have needed for years. I have seen two dispatchers' offices that were really what they should be. Of course, I have not seen them all, but enough to convince me that very little thought is given to the proper equipment and privacy of the office, and overtime enough is caused from this one fault to give each set of dispatchers a beautiful parlor, with marble tables and celluloid time tables, nickel-plated cuspidors, and a gas jet for lighting his pipe (turned down low, of course).--Union Man. "AN OBJECT OF PITY." Looking back to that day before a great many of us were born, during war time, reconstruction days, panic of '73, as well as the one of '93, we can easily see that a regular position paying $45 or $50 per month was a temptation. It appealed to the very best classes of boys, and looking forward to being a train dispatcher was a high aim, and every one of them respected the dispatcher; he was something they could look up to. In most offlces his salary was double as much, sometimes three or even more times as much as the poor operator, and only eight hours' work each day. It was a h...

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Order of Railroad Train Dispatchers
Published by RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1236102746 ISBN 13: 9781236102744
New Paperback Quantity Available: > 20
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Book Description RareBooksClub. Paperback. Book Condition: New. This item is printed on demand. 212 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.5in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 Excerpt: . . . as it can be done, when it is considered that we have no mechanical devices, no hold whatever on those with whom we transmit orders. What we want is more than others have, and do more than others do; stand apart and ahead in our vocation; incite the confidence of the traveling public. This would greatly increase travel, and make us worth more. A thorough organization and a strong one is elevating. We see that on every hand. Let us be the giant that has been sleeping unknown and undisturbed (because we have been hard to disturb, not because we have not been trampled on with a vengeance). Wake up now, and let us give the inhabitants of this glorious nation what they have needed for years. I have seen two dispatchers offices that were really what they should be. Of course, I have not seen them all, but enough to convince me that very little thought is given to the proper equipment and privacy of the office, and overtime enough is caused from this one fault to give each set of dispatchers a beautiful parlor, with marble tables and celluloid time tables, nickel-plated cuspidors, and a gas jet for lighting his pipe (turned down low, of course). --Union Man. AN OBJECT OF PITY. Looking back to that day before a great many of us were born, during war time, reconstruction days, panic of 73, as well as the one of 93, we can easily see that a regular position paying 45 or 50 per month was a temptation. It appealed to the very best classes of boys, and looking forward to being a train dispatcher was a high aim, and every one of them respected the dispatcher; he was something they could look up to. In most offlces his salary was double as much, sometimes three or even more times as much as the poor operator, and only eight hours work each day. It was a h. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Bookseller Inventory # 9781236102744

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